17

I have a class that requires a non-default copy constructor and assignment operator (it contains lists of pointers). Is there any general way to reduce the code duplication between the copy constructor and the assignment operator?

2
18

There's no "general way" for writing custom copy constructors and assignment operators that works in all cases. But there's an idiom called "copy-&-swap":

 class myclass
 {
    ...
 public:
    myclass(myclass const&);

    void swap(myclass & with);

    myclass& operator=(myclass copy) {
        this->swap(copy);
        return *this;
    }

    ...
};

It's useful in many (but not all) situations. Sometimes you can do better. A vector or a string could have a better assignment which reuses allocated storage if it was large enough.

9
  • 2
    +1 - good and terse summary of copy-swap i think. Also good idea about reusing storage. – Johannes Schaub - litb Sep 25 '09 at 13:09
  • 3
    You might want to point out the subtlety here between your operator= and the more standard const myclass& operator=(const myclass& other); – Bill Sep 25 '09 at 16:33
  • 1
    The swap() should probably marked as nothrow. Ditto on Bills comment. Some more explnation would be nice. – Martin York Sep 25 '09 at 16:49
  • Also note that: > swap ought to be a free function 'void swap(myclass&, myclass&)' > you still have to enumerate all your attributes in swap, instead of enumerating them in the assignment operator – Matthieu M. Sep 29 '09 at 12:45
  • 1
    @kevinarpe: Nothing special. swap(copy) also works. Sometimes I write this-> to make it more explicit that it's a data member or member function. – sellibitze Aug 26 '16 at 11:28
17

Factor out the common code to a private member function. A simple (rather contrived) example:

#include <iostream>

class Test
{
public:
  Test(const char* n)
  {
    name = new char[20];
    strcpy(name, n);
  }

  ~Test()
  {
    delete[] name;
  }

  // Copy constructor
  Test(const Test& t)
  {
    std::cout << "In copy constructor.\n";
    MakeDeepCopy(t);
  }

  // Assignment operator
  const Test& operator=(const Test& t)
  {
    std::cout << "In assignment operator.\n";
    MakeDeepCopy(t);
  }

  const char* get_name() const { return name; }

private:
  // Common function where the actual copying happens.
  void MakeDeepCopy(const Test& t)
  {        
    strcpy(name, t.name);
  }

private:
  char* name;
};

int
main()
{
  Test t("vijay");
  Test t2(t); // Calls copy constructor.
  Test t3(""); 
  t3 = t2; // Calls the assignment operator.

  std::cout << t.get_name() << ", " << t2.get_name() << ", " << t3.get_name() << '\n';

  return 0;
}
9
  • 3
    memory leak! MakeDeepCopy ignores the possibility of name already pointing to allocated memory. – sellibitze Sep 25 '09 at 13:12
  • 4
    But it's a pity that the copy constructor cannot use member initializers, this way... – xtofl Sep 25 '09 at 13:20
  • 2
    Note that t2 = t2 won't work with the assignment operator as written. (You care about this if you want to sort an array of them, for example.) – dave4420 Sep 25 '09 at 13:29
  • 2
    To add a little more: I don't think reuse is applicable. There's a difference between creating a new object and just assigning to it. In the cases where simple member-wise assignment is sufficient, custom copy constructors and assignment operators are not needed. In case you have to do something more advanced (i.e. managing allocated memory) the similarity between copy and assignment is near zero. – sellibitze Sep 25 '09 at 13:31
  • 2
    @Vijay: but now you forgot to initialize "name" for copy construction which sort of proves my point. When explicit resource management is involved copy construction and copy assignment do different things. The possibility of reuse is minimal. – sellibitze Sep 25 '09 at 14:31
8
My &My::operator = (My temp)  // thanks, sellibitze
{
    swap (*this, temp);
    return *this;
}

and implement a specialised std::swap<> (My &, My &).

4
3

As has already been pointed out by quite a few posters, having operator= create a new object with the copy constructor and then use swap is the common technique used to not have to replicate code in operator=.

That said, I want to point out some a pro and a con of this technique to help you decide whether it is appropriate.

Pro - exception safety

If your object has resource requirements that could cause a throw and assuming that swap will not throw, this technique provides the strong guarantee of exception safety (either the object being assigned to has taken on the value of the other object or it is unchanged).

Con - resource footprint

An issue with this technique is that it requires a complete new object to be created before the old one is released. If your object requires a lot of resources, this can be a problem.

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