I have

 [
   {:date => "2012-05", :post => 1}, 
   {:date => "2012-12", :post => 1}, 
   {:date => "2013-02", :post => 1}, 
   {:date => "2012-05", :online => 1}
 ]

And I want to get:

[
  {:date => "2012-05", :post => 1, :online => 1}, 
  {:date => "2012-12", :post => 1 }, 
  {:date => "2013-02", :post => 1 }
]

Anyone sees how to apply Ruby hash/array methods to achieve this?

  • 1
    What have you tried? – user554546 Feb 8 '13 at 16:16
  • Thanks for the great answers! I hope to summarize some of my insights on this in a small blog post soon. Didn't know too much about the power of group_by and inject. – poseid Feb 8 '13 at 17:08
  • I have tried to summarize some of my learnings here: thinkingonthinking.com/map-reduce-in-ruby – poseid Feb 9 '13 at 21:23
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can solve it via inject and detect:

arr = [
        {:date => "2012-05", :post => 1}, 
        {:date => "2012-12", :post => 1}, 
        {:date => "2013-02", :post => 1}, 
        {:date => "2012-05", :online => 1}
      ]

arr.inject([]) do |new_array, a|

  # if there is an existing hash in the new array with the same date
  # merge the values
  #
  if existing = new_array.detect{ |b| a[:date] == b[:date] } 
    existing.merge!(a)
  else
    new_array << a
  end

  # always return the new array for new iteration
  #
  new_array
end
  • wow... very cool, I need to understand better the inject... thanks! – poseid Feb 8 '13 at 16:27
  • 2
    Note that the use of detect inside of inject converts a O(n) problem to O(n^2). – tokland Feb 8 '13 at 16:48
  • @tokland Interesting thought, but how come? If any, detect would render the problem O(2n), but it is not duplicating objects, or do I misunderstand? – Beat Richartz Feb 8 '13 at 16:54
  • I mean complexity in time. Look at it this way: inject is O(n), detect is also O(n). Since they are nested, it makes the complete algorithm O(n^2) in the worst case. – tokland Feb 8 '13 at 16:56
  • @tokland ok, get it. What is group_by then? O(n log n)? – Beat Richartz Feb 8 '13 at 17:20
q.group_by { |x| x[:date] }.values.map { |e| e.reduce :merge }
  • very nice answer too! – poseid Feb 8 '13 at 16:59

Functional approach:

items_by_date = items.group_by { |h| h[:date] }
result = items_by_date.map { |date, hs| hs.reduce(:merge) }
  • +1. Nice job, I stole your #reduce. – DigitalRoss Feb 8 '13 at 16:36
  • @DigitalRoss: You're welcome :-) To keep it slightly different I've mapped directly over the grouped hash and used an intermediate variable. – tokland Feb 8 '13 at 16:38

Here is one attempt:

a = {:date=>"2012-05", :post=>1}, {:date=>"2012-12", :post=>1}, {:date=>"2013-02", :post=>1}
b = {:date=>"2012-05", :online=>1}

ar = {}; [a, b].flatten.each do |k|
  c = k.first[1]; ar[c] ||= Array.new
  ar[c] << { k.to_a.last[0] => k.to_a.last[1] }
end

ar.map { |k,v| { k => v[1] ? v[0].merge(v[1]) : v[0] } }
hash = [
   {:date => "2012-05", :post => 1}, 
   {:date => "2012-12", :post => 1}, 
   {:date => "2013-02", :post => 1}, 
   {:date => "2012-05", :online => 1}
 ]

hash.group_by{ |h| h[:date] }.values.map{ |x| x.reduce(:merge) }
=> [{:date=>"2012-05", :post=>1, :online=>1},
    {:date=>"2012-12", :post=>1},
    {:date=>"2013-02", :post=>1}]
  • isn't the same that @DigitalRoss'? – tokland Feb 8 '13 at 16:48
  • actually yes, I was writing my answer too long. – megas Feb 8 '13 at 16:55

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