There's a function, which gives me urls like:

./some.css
./extra/some.css
../../lib/slider/slider.css

It's always a relative path.

Let's think we know current path of the page, like http://site.com/stats/2012/, not sure how do I convert these relative paths to real ones?

We should get something like:

./some.css => http://site.com/stats/2012/some.css
./extra/some.css => http://site.com/stats/2012/extra/some.css
../../lib/slider/slider.css => http://site.com/lib/slider/slider.css

No jQuery, only vanilla javascript.

  • 7
    This is for javascript application, not a regular site. – Jasper Feb 8 '13 at 20:01

10 Answers 10

up vote 36 down vote accepted

This should do it:

function absolute(base, relative) {
    var stack = base.split("/"),
        parts = relative.split("/");
    stack.pop(); // remove current file name (or empty string)
                 // (omit if "base" is the current folder without trailing slash)
    for (var i=0; i<parts.length; i++) {
        if (parts[i] == ".")
            continue;
        if (parts[i] == "..")
            stack.pop();
        else
            stack.push(parts[i]);
    }
    return stack.join("/");
}
  • some sites have internal resources with ~, ~/media/style.css, ran into this the other day – Daniel Lizik Jun 14 '16 at 13:46
  • @Daniel_L: ~ typically means something else than base. And it's not exactly a relative path :-) If you need help with paths containing a tilde, please ask a new question – Bergi Jun 14 '16 at 13:48
  • 1
    For anyone encountering this later, using document.location.href for base worked for me. – nixkuroi Mar 24 '17 at 20:48
  • 1
    This solution has a problem when the relative url starts with a / for example /some.css. A correct implementation would in such a case remove all of the items in the stack after the domain name. – Vineet May 15 '17 at 18:54
  • @Vineet Correct, however a path starting with / is not relative. My function only considers paths, not URIs. – Bergi May 15 '17 at 19:05

Javascript will do it for you. No need to create a function. no need to set basename.

var link = document.createElement("a");
link.href = "../../lib/slider/slider.css";
alert(link.protocol+"//"+link.host+link.pathname+link.search+link.hash);

//output will be "http://www.yoursite.com/lib/slider/slider.css"

If you need to have a function, just wrap this as a function with 3 lines of code.

var absolutePath = function(href) {
    var link = document.createElement("a");
    link.href = href;
    return (link.protocol+"//"+link.host+link.pathname+link.search+link.hash);
}

---- UPDATED ---
More simpler version only if you need the absolute path

var absolutePath = function(href) {
    var link = document.createElement("a");
    link.href = href;
    return link.href;
}
  • 2
    Nice, but only workable in the browser which I don't think the OP wants.. – Pero P. Feb 8 '13 at 23:37
  • 4
    This doesn't work in IE, not even IE11. See this for more details: stackoverflow.com/questions/470832/… – Oran Dennison Jul 13 '15 at 21:41
  • 2
    Works great (in IE too)...I found that simply accessing link.href after being set returned the resolved URL (i.e., no need to manually rebuild the href). – Chris Baxter Aug 4 '15 at 18:03
  • doesn't work in cordova for me – Stanislav Dec 23 '15 at 6:27
  • @ChrisBaxter Same here. I'm a bit annoyed that this popular answer refers to protocol, host, etc... whereas href looks simpler and safer. Is there a reason for this? I would like to know... – philippe_b Mar 1 at 13:06

The most simple, efficient and correct way to do so it to just use URL api.

new URL("http://www.stackoverflow.com?q=hello").href;
//=> http://www.stackoverflow.com/?q=hello"

new URL("mypath","http://www.stackoverflow.com").href;
//=> "http://www.stackoverflow.com/mypath"

new URL("../mypath","http://www.stackoverflow.com/search").href
//=> "http://www.stackoverflow.com/mypath"

new URL("../mypath", window.location.href).href
//=> "https://stackoverflow.com/questions/mypath"

Performance wise, this solution is on par with using string manipulation and twice as fast as creating a tag.

This from MDN is unbreakable!

/*\
|*|
|*|  :: translate relative paths to absolute paths ::
|*|
|*|  https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/document.cookie
|*|
|*|  The following code is released under the GNU Public License, version 3 or later.
|*|  http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-3.0-standalone.html
|*|
\*/

function relPathToAbs (sRelPath) {
  var nUpLn, sDir = "", sPath = location.pathname.replace(/[^\/]*$/, sRelPath.replace(/(\/|^)(?:\.?\/+)+/g, "$1"));
  for (var nEnd, nStart = 0; nEnd = sPath.indexOf("/../", nStart), nEnd > -1; nStart = nEnd + nUpLn) {
    nUpLn = /^\/(?:\.\.\/)*/.exec(sPath.slice(nEnd))[0].length;
    sDir = (sDir + sPath.substring(nStart, nEnd)).replace(new RegExp("(?:\\\/+[^\\\/]*){0," + ((nUpLn - 1) / 3) + "}$"), "/");
  }
  return sDir + sPath.substr(nStart);
}

Sample usage:

/* Let us be in /en-US/docs/Web/API/document.cookie */

alert(location.pathname);
// displays: /en-US/docs/Web/API/document.cookie

alert(relPathToAbs("./"));
// displays: /en-US/docs/Web/API/

alert(relPathToAbs("../Guide/API/DOM/Storage"));
// displays: /en-US/docs/Web/Guide/API/DOM/Storage

alert(relPathToAbs("../../Firefox"));
// displays: /en-US/docs/Firefox

alert(relPathToAbs("../Guide/././API/../../../Firefox"));
// displays: /en-US/docs/Firefox
  • 2
    It doesn't handle relative paths with a leading /. Example: relPathToAbs("/?foo=bar") should return "/?foo=bar" instead it returns /questions/14780350/?foo=bar which means it's not properly detecting a leading / when sends the path back to the root. – Nucleon Nov 8 '14 at 22:35
  • @Nucleon The path is the part of the URL included between the protocol segment (http(s)://) and the search / hash segments (?/#). It is not concern of that function to separate the path part from the search / hash parts, also because Regular Expressions can make it very easy: relPathToAbs("./?foo=bar#someHash".replace(/^[^\?#]*/, "$&")) – madmurphy Nov 10 '14 at 17:10
  • 1
    @Nucleon Sorry, I had misunderstood your comment. A path starting with / is already an absolute path! Therefore it has no sense to put it as argument of that function! The string "/?foo=bar" is already an absolute path. – madmurphy Nov 12 '14 at 12:17
  • Exactly, but run your function on this page's URL relPathToAbs("/?foo=bar"). It doesn't return /?foo=bar (because it's already absolute) it returns /questions/14780350/?foo=bar. – Nucleon Nov 12 '14 at 18:03
  • 1
    @Nucleon The function expects you're giving a relative path. The string /?foo=bar is a wrong relative path (indeed it is an absolute path). A valid relative path must start with /^(?:\.\.?\/)*[^\/]/. E.g.: /^(?:\.\.?\/)*[^\/]/.test("./hello/world") --> true; /^(?:\.\.?\/)*[^\/]/.test("../hi") --> true; /^(?:\.\.?\/)*[^\/]/.test("../././../foo") --> true; /^(?:\.\.?\/)*[^\/]/.test("/") --> false; /^(?:\.\.?\/)*[^\/]/.test("/?foo=bar") --> false; – madmurphy Nov 17 '14 at 12:47

If you want to make a relative-to-absolute conversion for a link from a custom webpage in your browser (not for the page that runs your script), you can use a more enhanced version of the function suggested by @Bergi:

var resolveURL=function resolve(url, base){
    if('string'!==typeof url || !url){
        return null; // wrong or empty url
    }
    else if(url.match(/^[a-z]+\:\/\//i)){ 
        return url; // url is absolute already 
    }
    else if(url.match(/^\/\//)){ 
        return 'http:'+url; // url is absolute already 
    }
    else if(url.match(/^[a-z]+\:/i)){ 
        return url; // data URI, mailto:, tel:, etc.
    }
    else if('string'!==typeof base){
        var a=document.createElement('a'); 
        a.href=url; // try to resolve url without base  
        if(!a.pathname){ 
            return null; // url not valid 
        }
        return 'http://'+url;
    }
    else{ 
        base=resolve(base); // check base
        if(base===null){
            return null; // wrong base
        }
    }
    var a=document.createElement('a'); 
    a.href=base;

    if(url[0]==='/'){ 
        base=[]; // rooted path
    }
    else{ 
        base=a.pathname.split('/'); // relative path
        base.pop(); 
    }
    url=url.split('/');
    for(var i=0; i<url.length; ++i){
        if(url[i]==='.'){ // current directory
            continue;
        }
        if(url[i]==='..'){ // parent directory
            if('undefined'===typeof base.pop() || base.length===0){ 
                return null; // wrong url accessing non-existing parent directories
            }
        }
        else{ // child directory
            base.push(url[i]); 
        }
    }
    return a.protocol+'//'+a.hostname+base.join('/');
}

It'll return null if something is wrong.

Usage:

resolveURL('./some.css', 'http://example.com/stats/2012/'); 
// returns http://example.com/stats/2012/some.css

resolveURL('extra/some.css', 'http://example.com/stats/2012/');
// returns http://example.com/stats/2012/extra/some.css

resolveURL('../../lib/slider/slider.css', 'http://example.com/stats/2012/');
// returns http://example.com/lib/slider/slider.css

resolveURL('/rootFolder/some.css', 'https://example.com/stats/2012/');
// returns https://example.com/rootFolder/some.css

resolveURL('localhost');
// returns http://localhost

resolveURL('../non_existing_file', 'example.com')
// returns null
function canonicalize(url) {
    var div = document.createElement('div');
    div.innerHTML = "<a></a>";
    div.firstChild.href = url; // Ensures that the href is properly escaped
    div.innerHTML = div.innerHTML; // Run the current innerHTML back through the parser
    return div.firstChild.href;
}

This works on IE6 too, unlike some other solutions (see Getting an absolute URL from a relative one. (IE6 issue))

The href solution only works once the document is loaded (at least in IE11). This worked for me:

link = link || document.createElement("a");
link.href = window.location.href + "/../" + href;
return link.href;

The proposed and accepted solution does not support server relative URLs and does not work on absolute URLs. If my relative is /sites/folder1 it won't work for example.

Here is another function that supports full, server relative or relative URLs as well as ../ for one level up. It is not perfect but covers a lot of options. Use this when your base URL is not the current page URL, otherwise there are better alternatives.

    function relativeToAbsolute(base, relative) {
    //make sure base ends with /
    if (base[base.length - 1] != '/')
        base += '/';

    //base: https://server/relative/subfolder/
    //url: https://server
    let url = base.substr(0, base.indexOf('/', base.indexOf('//') + 2));
    //baseServerRelative: /relative/subfolder/
    let baseServerRelative = base.substr(base.indexOf('/', base.indexOf('//') + 2));
    if (relative.indexOf('/') === 0)//relative is server relative
        url += relative;
    else if (relative.indexOf("://") > 0)//relative is a full url, ignore base.
        url = relative;
    else {
        while (relative.indexOf('../') === 0) {
            //remove ../ from relative
            relative = relative.substring(3);
            //remove one part from baseServerRelative. /relative/subfolder/ -> /relative/
            if (baseServerRelative !== '/') {
                let lastPartIndex = baseServerRelative.lastIndexOf('/', baseServerRelative.length - 2);
                baseServerRelative = baseServerRelative.substring(0, lastPartIndex + 1);
            }
        }
        url += baseServerRelative + relative;//relative is a relative to base.
    }

    return url;
}

Hope this helps. It was really frustrating not to have this basic utility available in JavaScript.

  • As far as I can tell, this wouldn't work with protocol-independent urls? Eg. //www.example.com/page. – Liam Gray Apr 4 '17 at 22:18
  • No, but it is easy to support if you just change this statement: else if (relative.indexOf("://") > 0) and remove the : but I keep it this way since it can take the protocol from the base, which I send dynamically anyway. – Shai Petel Jul 17 '17 at 19:23

I had to add a fix to the accepted solution because we can have slashes after # in our angularjs navigation.

function getAbsoluteUrl(base, relative) {
  // remove everything after #
  var hashPosition = base.indexOf('#');
  if (hashPosition > 0){
    base = base.slice(0, hashPosition);
  }

  // the rest of the function is taken from http://stackoverflow.com/a/14780463
  // http://stackoverflow.com/a/25833886 - this doesn't work in cordova
  // http://stackoverflow.com/a/14781678 - this doesn't work in cordova
  var stack = base.split("/"),
      parts = relative.split("/");
  stack.pop(); // remove current file name (or empty string)
               // (omit if "base" is the current folder without trailing slash)
  for (var i=0; i<parts.length; i++) {
    if (parts[i] == ".")
      continue;
    if (parts[i] == "..")
      stack.pop();
    else
      stack.push(parts[i]);
  }
  return stack.join("/");
}
  • I added if (charAt(0) !== ".") return relative; to handle the case where relative is already an absolute path, so I don't have to check if it's relative first, before calling this function. – mindplay.dk Dec 8 '16 at 12:21

I found a very simple solution to do this while still supporting IE 10 (IE doesn't support the URL-API) by using the History API (IE 10 or higher). This solution works without any string manipulation.

function resolveUrl(relativePath) {
    var originalUrl = document.location.href;
    history.replaceState(history.state, '', relativePath);
    var resolvedUrl = document.location.href;
    history.replaceState(history.state, '', originalUrl);
    return resolvedUrl;
}

history.replaceState() won't trigger browser navigation, but will still modify document.location and supports relative aswell as absolute paths.

The one drawback of this solution is that if you are already using the History-API and have set a custom state with a title, the current state's title is lost.

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