19

Suppose I pull changes from a git repo. Then the author of the repo force pushes to the central repo. Now I can't pull since the history is rewritten.

How can I pull the new commits (and abandon the old ones), assuming that the author force-pushed the correct version?

I know this is bad git workflow, but sometimes you can't avoid this.

42

Throwing away your local changes

If you want to discard your work, fetch and reset. For example, if you have a remote named origin and a branch named master:

$ git fetch origin
$ git reset --hard origin/master # Destroys your work

Keeping your local changes

If you don't want to throw away your work, you will have to do a git rebase --onto. Suppose the old origin looks like this:

A ---> B ---> C
              ^
              origin/master

And you have this:

A ---> B ---> C ---> X ---> Y ---> Z
              ^                    ^
              |                    master
              origin/master

Now, the upstream changes change things:

A ---> B ---> C ---> X ---> Y ---> Z
 \                                 ^
  ---> B'---> C'                   master
              ^          
              origin/master

You would have to run git rebase --onto origin/master <C> master, where <C> is the SHA-1 of the old origin/master branch before upstream changes. This gives you this:

A ---> B ---> C ---> X ---> Y ---> Z
 \
  ---> B'---> C'---> X'---> Y'---> Z'
              ^                    ^
              |                    master
              origin/master

Notice how B, C, X, Y, and Z are now "unreachable". They will eventually be removed from your repository by Git. In the meantime (90 days), Git will keep a copy in the reflog in case it turns out you made a mistake.

Fixing mistakes

If you git reset or git rebase wrong and accidentally lose some local changes, you can find the changes in the reflog.

In the comments, a user is suggesting git reflog expire with --expire=now but DO NOT RUN THIS COMMAND because this will DESTROY your safety net. The whole purpose of having a reflog is so that Git will sometimes save your neck when you run the wrong command.

Basically, what this command will do is immediately destroy the B, C, X, Y, and Z commits in the examples above so you can't get them back. There's no real benefit to running this command, except it might save a little bit of disk space, but Git will already purge the data after 90 days so this benefit is short-lived.

  • I think --hard should be used with git reset here. – Desty Jul 4 '16 at 13:47
  • @user: I STRONGLY RECOMMEND WITH ALL CAPS that people do not run that command unless they want to DESTROY THE DATA that Git keeps as a safety net in case you run the wrong command. – Dietrich Epp Aug 2 '17 at 15:35
  • @user: That command is unnecessary. Git will do the right thing when pushing anyway. The problem is that after a git reset --hard, you might realize that you've just made some kind of horrible mistake and you need to get your old data back. That's what the reflog is there for, as a safety net when you make a bad git reset, so that is the worst possible time to irrevocably destroy the data in the reflog. – Dietrich Epp Aug 2 '17 at 15:39
  • Interesting, I then it would be the same thing as delete the repository and clone again? That is exactly what I wanted when receiving the forced push. Reposting it here so I anyone interested on the same thing, can do it: git reflog expire --expire=now --all && git gc --prune=now --aggressive – user Aug 2 '17 at 15:44
  • 2
    @user: To anyone reading this comment, DO NOT run that command. I am not even sure what the command is trying to achieve, except destroying the safety net that saves your data in case you type a command wrong, such as the git reset --hard in the answer. Again, DO NOT destroy the reflog unless you are quite sure that you want to do that (again, why would you do that?) – Dietrich Epp Aug 2 '17 at 17:45
0

I came across a slightly modified version of this scenario. Here's what I did:

Initial condition

A--->B--->C--->D--->E
                    |
             local-1/master

A--->B--->C--->D--->E
                    |
              origin/master

A--->B--->C--->D--->E
                    |
             local-2/master

Squash and force push

A--->B--->CDE
           |
    local-1/master

A--->B--->CDE
           |
     origin/master

A--->B--->C--->D--->E
                    |
             local-2/master

Sync changes on local-2/master

$ git reset --soft B


    A--->B---> (local uncommitted changes)
         |
  local-2/master


$ git stash save "backup"


    A--->B
         |
  local-2/master

$ git pull origin master


    A--->B--->CDE
               |
        local-2/master

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