-1

I have the following Java code:

import java.util.Scanner;

public class C2F_F2C {


public static void main(String[] args) {
    boolean isNotValid = false;
    double toConvert;
    do {
        System.out.print("What do you want to convert from Celsius to Fahrenheit? ");
        Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
        String toConvertString = in.nextLine();
        isNotValid = false;
        try {
            toConvert = Double.parseDouble(toConvertString);
        }
        catch (java.lang.NumberFormatException e) {
            System.out.println("Error: Not a number");
            isNotValid = true;

        }
    } while (isNotValid);

    double inCelsius = toCelsius(toConvert);
    System.out.println("The value " + toConvert + " in Celsius is " + inCelsius);


}
public static double toCelsius( double fahrenheit ) {

    double celsius = (fahrenheit -32)*(5/9);
    return celsius;


}


}

However, when I run it, it throws the following error:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.Error: Unresolved compilation problems: 
    The local variable toConvert may not have been initialized
    The local variable toConvert may not have been initialized

    at C2F_F2C.main(C2F_F2C.java:24)

I initialized the variable before the do..while loop, and set the value in the try..catch loop. It appears that the variable has not been set. Sorry if this is a rather basic question, but I can't seem to figure it out.

2
  • @pst I didn't mean to, I just didn't know what was wrong.
    – Piccolo
    Feb 9, 2013 at 20:08
  • "The variable .. may (or might) not have be initialized". That means, there is some execution path of the program that has not been ruled out that could result in the variable not being assigned before it is used. The compile only uses what it can prove (or not prove) at compile time, which is somewhat limited: basically, no values can be used in this possible path detection.
    – user166390
    Feb 9, 2013 at 20:09

4 Answers 4

2

No, you don't initialize it before the loop and the try.

This :

double toConvert;

is a declaration, not an initialization.

This :

double toConvert = 0.0;

is an initialization.

2
  • Thanks! This worked. I feel dumb now. I'll accept as soon as I can, meaning 10 minutes.
    – Piccolo
    Feb 9, 2013 at 20:04
  • Nit: It is not related to not being initialized before the loop, because it is a do-while. This is perfectly valid, if not entirely sensible, code: int x() { int b; do { b = 1; } while (false); return b; }
    – user166390
    Feb 9, 2013 at 20:35
2

You need to initialize the local variables. you are thinking that you have initialized it inside the try block, but the compiler doesn't think that way.it thinks what if the try block doesn't run?? you have local variable which is not initialized. you have to initialize it during declaration itself.

double toConvert=0.0d;
2

I initialized the variable before the do..while loop,

No, you didn't initialize the variable. You just declared it. Local variables are not initialized by default.

and set the value in the try..catch loop

Yeah sure you did that, but just think what would happen, when your initialization statement in try-catch throws an exception? The exception will be handled, and your variable will not get initialized. Then further in your program, when you try to access the variable, what do you expect to happen?

So, just give the variable a default value. Change:

double toConvert;

to:

double toConvert = 0.0;
0

tldr; while one could assign an initial value the variable, doing so is a kludge and removes valuable information about the program flow.

Instead, consider what the problematic construct is. Note that the compiler knows that the loop body will execute at least once, because it uses the do-while form. Here is a simplified example of the failing case:

int b;
try {
  b = SomeMethodWhichMayOrMayNotThrowAnException();
} catch (Exception ex) {
  // b not assigned
}
// What is the value of b here?
// The compiler answer is: It *may* (or *might*) not be initialized.

A correct-er solution is to set b inside the catch or otherwise prevent it's use later on in a way the compiler can validate.

Remember that the compiler cannot use expressions not know at compile-time to determine which branches may or may not be executed. As such, the compiler doesn't know that the loop will be executed again if an exception is caught there.

However, consider altering the code to something like this:

double ReadValueToConvert (Scanner in) {
    while (true) {
        System.out.print("What do you want to convert from Celsius to Fahrenheit? ");
        String toConvertString = in.nextLine();
        try {
            // No need to keep a flag for the loop
            return Double.parseDouble(toConvertString);
        }
        catch (java.lang.NumberFormatException e) {
            System.out.println("Error: Not a number");
        }
    }
    // Compiler smart enough to know execution can never get here
}

// only create one Scanner, not one per loop
Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
// toConvert guaranteed to be assigned
double toConvert = ReadValueToConvert(in);

Note how it bypasses some issues and simplifies the code.

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