94

I would like to print a python dictionary to a file using PrettyPrinter (for human readability) but have the dictionary be sorted by key in the output file to further improve readability. So:

mydict = {'a':1, 'b':2, 'c':3}
pprint(mydict)

currently prints to

{'b':2,
 'c':3,
 'a':1}

I would like to PrettyPrint the dictionary but have it printed out sorted by key eg.

{'a':1,
 'b':2,
 'c':3}

What is the best way to do this?

2
  • Turns out pprint already sorts by key. Should have checked that more carefully.
    – Tilman
    Commented Sep 25, 2009 at 22:57
  • If it's just for hacky one-off debug output: in place of mydict, use json.loads(json.dumps(mydict, sort_keys=True)) :-) (Don't use this in production; it makes a copy of the dict mydict by first serializing to a JSON string and deserializing from it, so it's very inefficient, etc.) Commented Aug 23, 2023 at 19:37

9 Answers 9

111

Actually pprint seems to sort the keys for you under python2.5

>>> from pprint import pprint
>>> mydict = {'a':1, 'b':2, 'c':3}
>>> pprint(mydict)
{'a': 1, 'b': 2, 'c': 3}
>>> mydict = {'a':1, 'b':2, 'c':3, 'd':4, 'e':5}
>>> pprint(mydict)
{'a': 1, 'b': 2, 'c': 3, 'd': 4, 'e': 5}
>>> d = dict(zip("kjihgfedcba",range(11)))
>>> pprint(d)
{'a': 10,
 'b': 9,
 'c': 8,
 'd': 7,
 'e': 6,
 'f': 5,
 'g': 4,
 'h': 3,
 'i': 2,
 'j': 1,
 'k': 0}

But not always under python 2.4

>>> from pprint import pprint
>>> mydict = {'a':1, 'b':2, 'c':3, 'd':4, 'e':5}
>>> pprint(mydict)
{'a': 1, 'c': 3, 'b': 2, 'e': 5, 'd': 4}
>>> d = dict(zip("kjihgfedcba",range(11)))
>>> pprint(d)
{'a': 10,
 'b': 9,
 'c': 8,
 'd': 7,
 'e': 6,
 'f': 5,
 'g': 4,
 'h': 3,
 'i': 2,
 'j': 1,
 'k': 0}
>>> 

Reading the source code of pprint.py (2.5) it does sort the dictionary using

items = object.items()
items.sort()

for multiline or this for single line

for k, v in sorted(object.items()):

before it attempts to print anything, so if your dictionary sorts properly like that then it should pprint properly. In 2.4 the second sorted() is missing (didn't exist then) so objects printed on a single line won't be sorted.

So the answer appears to be use python2.5, though this doesn't quite explain your output in the question.

Python3 Update

Pretty print by sorted keys (lambda x: x[0]):

for key, value in sorted(dict_example.items(), key=lambda x: x[0]): 
    print("{} : {}".format(key, value))

Pretty print by sorted values (lambda x: x[1]):

for key, value in sorted(dict_example.items(), key=lambda x: x[1]): 
    print("{} : {}".format(key, value))
1
  • The Python 3, lambda expression solution is slick. For clarity, I believe (?) key in for key, value in ... is independent of key in key=lambda ... as this works, for k,v in sorted(token_dict.items(), key=lambda x: x[0]) but for k,v in sorted(token_dict.items(), k=lambda x: x[0]) throws an error. Commented Mar 4, 2020 at 23:26
27

Another alternative :

>>> mydict = {'a':1, 'b':2, 'c':3}
>>> import json

Then with python2 :

>>> print json.dumps(mydict, indent=4, sort_keys=True) # python 2
{
    "a": 1, 
    "b": 2, 
    "c": 3
}

or with python 3 :

>>> print(json.dumps(mydict, indent=4, sort_keys=True)) # python 3
{
    "a": 1, 
    "b": 2, 
    "c": 3
}
17

An easy way to print the sorted contents of the dictionary, in Python 3:

>>> dict_example = {'c': 1, 'b': 2, 'a': 3}
>>> for key, value in sorted(dict_example.items()):
...   print("{} : {}".format(key, value))
... 
a : 3
b : 2
c : 1

The expression dict_example.items() returns tuples, which can then be sorted by sorted():

>>> dict_example.items()
dict_items([('c', 1), ('b', 2), ('a', 3)])
>>> sorted(dict_example.items())
[('a', 3), ('b', 2), ('c', 1)]

Below is an example to pretty print the sorted contents of a Python dictionary's values.

for key, value in sorted(dict_example.items(), key=lambda d_values: d_values[1]): 
    print("{} : {}".format(key, value))
2
  • Very nice. Here is an example to pretty print the sorted contents of a Python dictionary values: for key, value in sorted(dict_example.items(), key=lambda d_items: d_items[1]): print("{} : {}".format(key, value)) Commented Jun 19, 2017 at 15:16
  • 1
    @ScottSkiles you shoud edit the answer and add your example to it - I think it would help future readers
    – redbeam_
    Commented Mar 14, 2018 at 1:01
15

The Python pprint module actually already sorts dictionaries by key. In versions prior to Python 2.5, the sorting was only triggered on dictionaries whose pretty-printed representation spanned multiple lines, but in 2.5.X and 2.6.X, all dictionaries are sorted.

Generally, though, if you're writing data structures to a file and want them human-readable and writable, you might want to consider using an alternate format like YAML or JSON. Unless your users are themselves programmers, having them maintain configuration or application state dumped via pprint and loaded via eval can be a frustrating and error-prone task.

2
  • 2
    btw, ast.literal_eval("{'a': 0, 'b': 1, 2: 'c'}") -> {2: 'c', 'a': 0, 'b': 1} so there is no need for impious eval.
    – jfs
    Commented Sep 26, 2009 at 4:09
  • yes and apparently pprint does not offer a way to turn off this behavior. Wasted an hour or two trying to figure out why some pprint sample report data was getting sorted on keys. Commented Aug 14, 2019 at 0:28
12

I wrote the following function to print dicts, lists, and tuples in a more readable format:

def printplus(obj):
    """
    Pretty-prints the object passed in.

    """
    # Dict
    if isinstance(obj, dict):
        for k, v in sorted(obj.items()):
            print u'{0}: {1}'.format(k, v)

    # List or tuple            
    elif isinstance(obj, list) or isinstance(obj, tuple):
        for x in obj:
            print x

    # Other
    else:
        print obj

Example usage in iPython:

>>> dict_example = {'c': 1, 'b': 2, 'a': 3}
>>> printplus(dict_example)
a: 3
b: 2
c: 1

>>> tuple_example = ((1, 2), (3, 4), (5, 6), (7, 8))
>>> printplus(tuple_example)
(1, 2)
(3, 4)
(5, 6)
(7, 8)
6

I had the same problem you had. I used a for loop with the sorted function passing in the dictionary like so:

for item in sorted(mydict):
    print(item)
1
  • This is short and sweet, but only prints the keys and not the values. Commented Mar 13, 2021 at 7:36
4

You could transform this dict a little to ensure that (as dicts aren't kept sorted internally), e.g.

pprint([(key, mydict[key]) for key in sorted(mydict.keys())])
1

Another short oneliner:

mydict = {'c': 1, 'b': 2, 'a': 3}
print(*sorted(mydict.items()), sep='\n')
-1
def print_dict(d):
    def quote(obj):
        return f"'{obj}'" if isinstance(obj, str) else obj
    keys = list(sorted(d.keys()))
    pairs = [f"{quote(k)}: {quote(d[k])}" for k in keys]
    return '{' + ', '.join(pairs) + '}'
1
  • 1
    This won't work since .sort() doesn't return anything. Also, your quote() function does not work if obj is a string that contains a quote character (you'd just want repr anyway).
    – AKX
    Commented Aug 24, 2023 at 14:43

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