42

I have an android widget that fetches data from a server every 10 minutes and display's it on the screen.
I'd like to add a "Refresh" button to that widget.
When the user clicks that button I'd like to run the method that fetches the information from the server.
Adding an event handler to a button in an application is very easy, however I couldn't find an example for a widget.
I'd like to get some help with adding a function to a button click in a widget.

70

Here is one example more that should help:

package com.automatic.widget;

import android.app.PendingIntent;
import android.appwidget.AppWidgetManager;
import android.appwidget.AppWidgetProvider;
import android.content.ComponentName;
import android.content.Context;
import android.content.Intent;
import android.widget.RemoteViews;

public class Widget extends AppWidgetProvider {

    private static final String SYNC_CLICKED    = "automaticWidgetSyncButtonClick";

    @Override
    public void onUpdate(Context context, AppWidgetManager appWidgetManager, int[] appWidgetIds) {
        RemoteViews remoteViews;
        ComponentName watchWidget;

        remoteViews = new RemoteViews(context.getPackageName(), R.layout.widget_layout);
        watchWidget = new ComponentName(context, Widget.class);

        remoteViews.setOnClickPendingIntent(R.id.sync_button, getPendingSelfIntent(context, SYNC_CLICKED));
        appWidgetManager.updateAppWidget(watchWidget, remoteViews);
    }

    @Override
    public void onReceive(Context context, Intent intent) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        super.onReceive(context, intent);

        if (SYNC_CLICKED.equals(intent.getAction())) {

            AppWidgetManager appWidgetManager = AppWidgetManager.getInstance(context);

            RemoteViews remoteViews;
            ComponentName watchWidget;

            remoteViews = new RemoteViews(context.getPackageName(), R.layout.widget_layout);
            watchWidget = new ComponentName(context, Widget.class);

            remoteViews.setTextViewText(R.id.sync_button, "TESTING");

            appWidgetManager.updateAppWidget(watchWidget, remoteViews);

        }
    }

    protected PendingIntent getPendingSelfIntent(Context context, String action) {
        Intent intent = new Intent(context, getClass());
        intent.setAction(action);
        return PendingIntent.getBroadcast(context, 0, intent, 0);
    }
}
  • 2
    Thanks For Such Good Example I have use This code and my application Working fine....Thnks a Lots – Butani Vijay Jun 9 '13 at 12:22
  • Thank a ton, this answer helped me. =) – Rahmathullah M Jul 6 '13 at 10:31
  • 1
    This code worked without the confusion other examples presented - this is an excellent, concise example of the dev guide info - thanks! – headscratch Sep 10 '13 at 18:52
  • 2
    A note about PendingIntent.getBroadcast(context, 0, intent, 0): This will cause a bug if you have more than one instance of widgets. Problem: only last widget gets updated whenever you click any instance of widget. Solution: pass widgetId to getPendingSelfIntent and try this: PendingIntent.getBroadcast(context, widgetId, intent, 0) Detailed description – Alireza Mirian Jan 29 '16 at 20:04
  • Excellent. Thank You..!!! – Ahamed Mujeeb Sep 13 at 4:43
45

I found out how to do that.
Add an action to the AndroidManifest.xml file in the > <receiver><intent-filter> tag:

<action android:name="MY_PACKAGE_NAME.WIDGET_BUTTON" />

In the provider add a constant that matches the action name:

public static String WIDGET_BUTTON = "MY_PACKAGE_NAME.WIDGET_BUTTON";

In the onUpdate() method add a pending intent that matches the action:

Intent intent = new Intent(WIDGET_BUTTON);
PendingIntent pendingIntent = PendingIntent.getBroadcast(context, 0, intent, PendingIntent.FLAG_UPDATE_CURRENT);
views.setOnClickPendingIntent(R.id.MY_BUTTON_ID, pendingIntent );

Finally, in the onRecieve() method, check the action name:

 if (WIDGET_BUTTON.equals(intent.getAction())) {
//your code here

    }
  • Thank you very much! – Андрей Москвичёв Oct 17 '13 at 3:56
  • Thanks @Sharon Haim Pour! – Edmond Tamas Dec 30 '13 at 7:35
  • 1
    I think it is interesting to note that you can (and probably should) use an explicit intent instead of an implicit intent. This means that you don't have to define the action in the manifest and that you should create the intent like this: Intent intent = new Intent(context, MyClass.class); – user936580 Mar 8 '14 at 9:19
  • Thanks! This button event listener for widget helps me a lot. Now, it's time for experiment and I have to explore more about widget making for Android. – David Dimalanta Dec 15 '14 at 4:34
  • This code is a better option than the one above as it uses explicit intent which makes it easier to call the intent from a configuration activity too – TanmayP Feb 16 '15 at 0:25
11

Here is another answer with the following benefits:

  • It handles all App Widget instances (a user might have multiple instances of your widget in various configurations/sizes on your screen). Coding for all instances is what the official documentation prescribes. See Guide > App Widgets > Using the AppWidgetProvider Class , scroll down to the code example for "ExampleAppWidgetProvider".
  • The workhorse code in onReceive in effect calls onUpdate (so you reduce code duplication).
  • The code in onUpdate(Context context) is generalised so that it can be dropped into any AppWidgetProvider subclass.

The code:

public class MyWidget extends AppWidgetProvider {

    private static final String ACTION_UPDATE_CLICK = 
              "com.example.myapp.action.UPDATE_CLICK";

    private static int mCount = 0;

    private static String getMessage() {
        return String.valueOf(mCount++);
    }

    private PendingIntent getPendingSelfIntent(Context context, String action) {
        // An explicit intent directed at the current class (the "self").
        Intent intent = new Intent(context, getClass());
        intent.setAction(action);
        return PendingIntent.getBroadcast(context, 0, intent, 0);
    }

    @Override
    public void onUpdate(Context context, AppWidgetManager appWidgetManager,
                         int[] appWidgetIds) {
        super.onUpdate(context, appWidgetManager, appWidgetIds);

        String message = getMessage();

        // Loop for every App Widget instance that belongs to this provider.
        // Noting, that is, a user might have multiple instances of the same
        // widget on
        // their home screen.
        for (int appWidgetID : appWidgetIds) {
            RemoteViews remoteViews = new RemoteViews(context.getPackageName(),
                                                      R.layout.my_widget);

            remoteViews.setTextViewText(R.id.textView_output, message);
            remoteViews.setOnClickPendingIntent(R.id.button_update,
                                                getPendingSelfIntent(context,
                                                           ACTION_UPDATE_CLICK)
            );

            appWidgetManager.updateAppWidget(appWidgetID, remoteViews);

        }
    }

    /**
     * A general technique for calling the onUpdate method,
     * requiring only the context parameter.
     *
     * @author John Bentley, based on Android-er code.
     * @see <a href="http://android-er.blogspot.com
     * .au/2010/10/update-widget-in-onreceive-method.html">
     * Android-er > 2010-10-19 > Update Widget in onReceive() method</a>
     */
    private void onUpdate(Context context) {
        AppWidgetManager appWidgetManager = AppWidgetManager.getInstance
                (context);

        // Uses getClass().getName() rather than MyWidget.class.getName() for
        // portability into any App Widget Provider Class
        ComponentName thisAppWidgetComponentName =
                new ComponentName(context.getPackageName(),getClass().getName()
        );
        int[] appWidgetIds = appWidgetManager.getAppWidgetIds(
                thisAppWidgetComponentName);
        onUpdate(context, appWidgetManager, appWidgetIds);
    }

    @Override
    public void onReceive(Context context, Intent intent) {
        super.onReceive(context, intent);

        if (ACTION_UPDATE_CLICK.equals(intent.getAction())) {
            onUpdate(context);
        }
    }

}

The widget looks like this

Widget update button example. Simple counting.

This builds on the getPendingSelfIntent work of @Kels, @SharonHaimPour and @Erti-ChrisEelmaa.

It also builds on Android-er > 2010-10-19 > Update Widget in onReceive() method (not me) where it is demonstrated how to call onUpdate from onReceive, on an App Widget instance basis. I make that code general and wrap it in callOnUpdate.

10
protected PendingIntent getPendingSelfIntent(Context context, String action) {
    Intent intent = new Intent(context, getClass());
    intent.setAction(action);
    return PendingIntent.getBroadcast(context, 0, intent, 0);
}

views.setOnClickPendingIntent(R.id.Timm, getPendingSelfIntent(context,
                              "ham"));

Also prefer URL :

How to correctly handle click events on Widget

If you solved it in a different way, please provide this as an answer

  • 1
    I didn't understand where to put this code. Where you call the function in the click? – Sharon Haim Pour Feb 11 '13 at 7:45

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