17

I have a python application which has lots of small database access functions, using sqlalchemy. I'm trying to avoid having lots of boilerplate session handling code around these functions.

I have numerous functions that look something like this:

def get_ticket_history(Session, ticket_id):
    s = Session()
    try:
        rows = s.query(TicketHistory)\
                .filter(TicketHistory.ticket_fk==ticket_id)\
                .order_by(TicketHistory.id.desc()).all()
        s.commit()
        return rows
    except:
        s.rollback()
        raise
    finally:
        s.close()

I am trying to refactor these functions, but not sure I have the best approach yet. The best I currently have is the following:

def execute(Session, fn, *args, **kwargs):
    s = Session()
    try:
        ret = fn(s, *args, **kwargs)
        s.commit()
        return ret
    except:
        s.rollback()
        raise
    finally:
        s.close()

def get_ticket_history(self, ticket_id):
    def sql_fn(s):
        return s.query(TicketHistory)\
                .filter(TicketHistory.ticket_fk==ticket_id)\
                .order_by(TicketHistory.id.desc()).all()
    return execute(self.sentinel_session, sql_fn)

Is there a better or more idiomatic way of doing this? Perhaps using a decorator?

Thanks, Jon

  • 1
    A context manager would be a very good way to go. – Martin Maillard Feb 10 '13 at 15:58
29

The SQLAlchemy docs present a possible way of doing this with context managers.

http://docs.sqlalchemy.org/en/latest/orm/session_basics.html#when-do-i-construct-a-session-when-do-i-commit-it-and-when-do-i-close-it

Copying the code snippet here for completeness:

from contextlib import contextmanager

@contextmanager
def session_scope():
    """Provide a transactional scope around a series of operations."""
    session = Session()
    try:
        yield session
        session.commit()
    except:
        session.rollback()
        raise
    finally:
        session.close()

This session_scope can be used cleanly without repeating the boiler plate now.

class ThingOne(object):
    def go(self, session):
        session.query(FooBar).update({"x": 5})

class ThingTwo(object):
    def go(self, session):
        session.query(Widget).update({"q": 18})

def run_my_program():
    with session_scope() as session:
        ThingOne().go(session)
        ThingTwo().go(session)
  • 29
    The SQLAlchemy devs document a possible, likely and simple implementation that solve the session's lifetime problem nicely. Why didn't they go the extra-mile and provide it as a built-in function instead of having all the library users rewrite one version of that code in their code base ? – ereOn Jan 12 '16 at 12:57
  • 1
    Good point, was also thinking the same thing. – Jernej Jerin Nov 20 '17 at 8:58
0

morphyn's suggestion to use a context manager is good. You could make such a context manager by applying the contextlib.contextmanager decorator to a function very much like your first get_ticket_history, replacing the code between try and except with a yield statement and renaming it, say, transaction. PEP 343 has a near-identical example of that name.

Then, use that context manager with the with statement to reimplement get_ticket_history. It looks like SQLAlchemy already provides that function, though, as method begin:

http://docs.sqlalchemy.org/en/rel_0_8/orm/session.html#autocommit-mode

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