25

Given the object hierarchy

public class Parent
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public virtual Child Child { get; set; }
}

public class Child
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public virtual GrandChild GrandChild { get; set; }
}

public class GrandChild
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
}

and the DB context

public class MyContext : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<Parent> Parents { get; set; }
}

One can include children and grandchildren using Lambda syntax (using System.Data.Entity) like this:

using (MyContext ctx = new MyContext())
{
    var hierarchy = 
        from p in ctx.Parents.Include(p => p.Child.GrandChild) select p;
}

The Lambda syntax prevents breaking the query if the class names are subsequently altered. However, if Parent has an ICollection<Child> like this instead:

public class Parent
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<Child> Children { get; set; }
}

Lambda syntax no longer works. Instead, one can use the string syntax:

var hierarchy = from p in ctx.Parents.Include("Children.GrandChild") select p;

Is the string syntax the only option, or is there some alternative way to use Lambda syntax in this situation?

38

Sure, you can do

var hierarchy = from p in ctx.Parents
                    .Include(p => p.Children.Select(c => c.GrandChild))
                select p;

See MSDN, caption Remarks, the fifth bullet.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    To use the include method like this don't forget to reference System.Data.Entity. – Mike Bovenlander Mar 14 '18 at 13:37
  • You can recursively continue this Select() pattern for descendants as well if the grandchild has children and so on. – joshmcode May 2 '18 at 16:37
33

Update: If you are using Entity Framework Core you should use the following syntax

var hierarchy = from p in ctx.Parents
                    .Include(p => p.Children)
                    .ThenInclude(c => c.GrandChild)
                select p;
| improve this answer | |
  • 9
    Note: In my case, for some weird reason intellisense wouldn't prompt me with the Grandchild object in the ".ThenInclude" lambda clause, but this was an edge case where intellisense was wrong and it didn't matter - the code still compiled. – Ben Barreth Oct 27 '17 at 14:14
  • What if you need to include the children of the GrandChild (aka GrandGrandChild)? – Julen Apr 8 '19 at 10:14
  • 1
    @Julen you can use .ThenInclude recursively for every nested child entity, like this: Parent.Include(child).ThenInclude(GrandChild).ThenInclude(GrandGrandChild) .. etc – Mohamed Nagieb Jun 2 '19 at 11:40
  • 4
    How would you include two different grandchildren, say GrandSon and GrandDaughter? Something starting like ctx.Parents.Include(p => p.Children).ThenInclude(c => c.GrandSon).... You couldn't add ThenInclude(c => c.GrandDaughter) because it would look in the GrandSon object for the GrandDaughter. – Simon Tewsi Nov 22 '19 at 5:24
  • 3
    @SimonTewsi unfortunately the only way to do it right now is to .Include the top level a second time, then do another .ThenInclude with the other child you want to include. – Bodacious Jan 2 at 16:41

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