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How to detect a hotspot in an image using opencv? I have tried googling but couldnt get a clue of it.

Description: I need to filter good images from a live video stream. In this case I need to just detect the Hotspot in a frame. I need to do this in opencv.

What is HotSpot?

Hot spots are shiny areas on a subject’s face which are caused by a flash reflecting off a shiny surface or by uneven lighting. It tends to make the subject look as if they are sweating, which is not a good look.

Update : http://answers.opencv.org/question/7223/hotspots-in-an-image/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Specular_highlight

The above two links also could help for my Post?

Image with HotSpot:

enter image description here

Image Without HotSpot:

enter image description here

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    define hotspots – Ben Feb 11 '13 at 9:46
  • @Ben Hot spots are shiny areas on a subject’s face which are caused by a flash reflecting off a shiny surface or by uneven lighting. It tends to make the subject look as if they are sweating, which is not a good look. – 2vision2 Feb 11 '13 at 9:50
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    Try searching for 'highlight detection' instead. – Junuxx Feb 11 '13 at 10:08
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    A basic gaussian filtering with a crude threshold could do it. But the question is so badly specified that it should be closed as it stands. – mmgp Feb 11 '13 at 12:59
  • @mmgp Thanks for your reply. Can you please explain a bit more. So that I could try to implement it. Please.. – 2vision2 Feb 11 '13 at 13:13
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An automatic rough indication of these "hotspot" areas can be obtained by a gaussian filtering followed by a binarization. The expectation is that the "hotspot" is much brighter than the area around it, so after a gaussian filtering they will be at least slightly highlighted and, at the same time, image artifacts are reduced due to the nature of the low-pass filtering.

Example results follow. Binarization at 0.75 (range is always [0, 1]) after a simple conversion to grayscale, Binarization at 0.85 after a gaussian filtering in the B channel of the HSB colorspace:

enter image description here enter image description here

In both cases large components were removed due to the assumption that "hotspots" aren't too big.

  • Thanks for your answer. – 2vision2 Feb 12 '13 at 4:00
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    This method fails badly on many images. There are much better methods, e.g., see this: asiair.asia.edu.tw/ir/bitstream/310904400/19115/1/99052045.pdf – fireant Feb 12 '13 at 7:55
  • @mmgp : what is HSB colorspace? How is it different from HSV? – Abid Rahman K Feb 12 '13 at 11:41
  • @Shambool you are being fooled there just because it is a published paper. I've used YCbCr color space for skin detection, and it fails horribly very easily too. All you need is a photo where there is a bit more than the face region (note how this paper uses mostly only images that are faces under good conditions), a lot of of such photos contain colors that fools the method. The algorithm for determining bright area spots is purely an heuristic, so I have no idea why you think it is so superior. Anyway, this answer took me 30 seconds to write, so of course it can be improved (a lot). – mmgp Feb 12 '13 at 12:27
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    @2vision2 the paper about specularity removal is a good method to do what you are after, but please keep in mind there is no infallible method. It is also quite slow, this may or may not matter for you. Again, if it is not clear, there is no guarantee that any method will always give excellent results. For instance, i.imgur.com/A5Bov2Q.png is the specular free image by the method, and i.imgur.com/g45tHu8.png is the diffuse image (they are creepy, by the way) starting from the example image in the question. – mmgp Feb 13 '13 at 15:31

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