216

I want to create a script to check whether a user exists. I am using the logic below:

# getent passwd test > /dev/null 2&>1
# echo $?
0
# getent passwd test1 > /dev/null 2&>1
# echo $?
2

So if the user exists, then we have success, else the user does not exist. I have put above command in the bash script as below:

#!/bin/bash

getent passwd $1 > /dev/null 2&>1

if [ $? -eq 0 ]; then
    echo "yes the user exists"
else
    echo "No, the user does not exist"
fi

Now, my script always says that the user exists no matter what:

# sh passwd.sh test
yes the user exists
# sh passwd.sh test1
yes the user exists
# sh passwd.sh test2
yes the user exists

Why does the above condition always evaluate to be TRUE and say that the user exists?

Where am I going wrong?

UPDATE:

After reading all the responses, I found the problem in my script. The problem was the way I was redirecting getent output. So I removed all the redirection stuff and made the getent line look like this:

getent passwd $user  > /dev/null

Now my script is working fine.

6
  • I think that when you use $? you get the return code of the test command. See answer below.
    – user000001
    Feb 11, 2013 at 12:53
  • Is that the exact code you are running? No "echo" debug statements between the call to getent and your if statement? That would cause $? to check the exit status of echo, not your call to getent.
    – chepner
    Feb 11, 2013 at 14:09
  • 5
    Yeah I think you mean 2>&1 instead of 2&>1. May 2, 2016 at 17:05
  • Code works on non-empty input, but if $1 is not set, the if statement will return true. From my testing, solution would be to wrap $1 in double quotes: getent passwd "$1" > /dev/null 2&>1.
    – Vince
    Jul 24, 2017 at 14:28
  • Please mark an answer
    – Efren
    Sep 3, 2018 at 3:41

19 Answers 19

358

You can also check user by id command.

id -u name gives you the id of that user. if the user doesn't exist, you got command return value ($?)1

And as other answers pointed out: if all you want is just to check if the user exists, use if with id directly, as if already checks for the exit code. There's no need to fiddle with strings, [, $? or $():

if id "$1" &>/dev/null; then
    echo 'user found'
else
    echo 'user not found'
fi

(no need to use -u as you're discarding the output anyway)

Also, if you turn this snippet into a function or script, I suggest you also set your exit code appropriately:

#!/bin/bash
user_exists(){ id "$1" &>/dev/null; } # silent, it just sets the exit code
if user_exists "$1"; code=$?; then  # use the function, save the code
    echo 'user found'
else
    echo 'user not found' >&2  # error messages should go to stderr
fi
exit $code  # set the exit code, ultimately the same set by `id`
14
  • 3
    That's what I use. See superuser.com/questions/336275/find-out-if-user-name-exists
    – guettli
    Oct 11, 2013 at 11:09
  • 24
    great answer - just a minor tweak that works nicely... user_exists=$(id -u user > /dev/null 2>&1; echo $?) user_exists=0 if "user" exists, or 1 if not
    – Pancho
    Jun 2, 2015 at 22:37
  • 5
    @Pancho I think your variable should be named user_doesnt_exist Aug 31, 2016 at 9:22
  • 1
    @WillSheppard : At a general level boolean handling in bash is in my opinion less than clear and I typically avoid implicit boolean inferences in my code. The following make interesting reading and interestingly both favour 0 = true and <not 0> = false for bash purposes, and while not de facto, align with the variable name I have used from a boolean perspective also: stackoverflow.com/a/5431932/3051627 . stackoverflow.com/questions/2933843/… .
    – Pancho
    Aug 31, 2016 at 18:53
  • 2
    Thanks to @Pancho's comment I could achieve that, just by sending the error to the void and doing validuser(){ [[ -n $(id -u "$1" 2>/dev/null) ]] && echo 1 || echo 0; }. That, pretty much returns 1 if user exists, or 0 if it does not.
    – lu1s
    Feb 6, 2020 at 19:11
38

There's no need to check the exit code explicitly. Try

if getent passwd $1 > /dev/null 2>&1; then
    echo "yes the user exists"
else
    echo "No, the user does not exist"
fi

If that doesn't work, there is something wrong with your getent, or you have more users defined than you think.

37

Why don't you simply use

grep -c '^username:' /etc/passwd

It will return 1 (since a user has max. 1 entry) if the user exists and 0 if it doesn't.

4
  • 22
    This doesn't work if the server is using another system to manage uses such as NIS or LDAP. In this case, you can use getent passwd | grep -c '^username:' Nov 12, 2013 at 16:54
  • 1
    this will return 1 if you have a username, let's say "test1" and want to create a new username called "test".
    – Marin N.
    May 22, 2018 at 20:08
  • 2
    @MarinNedea the colon : after the username protects against substring matching by matching with the field separator, so the effect you describe won't happen. May 27, 2018 at 19:01
  • /etc/passwd depends on nsswitch.conf settings Oct 6, 2020 at 10:05
26

This is what I ended up doing in a Freeswitch bash startup script:

# Check if user exists
if ! id -u $FS_USER > /dev/null 2>&1; then
    echo "The user does not exist; execute below commands to crate and try again:"
    echo "  root@sh1:~# adduser --home /usr/local/freeswitch/ --shell /bin/false --no-create-home --ingroup daemon --disabled-password --disabled-login $FS_USER"
    echo "  ..."
    echo "  root@sh1:~# chown freeswitch:daemon /usr/local/freeswitch/ -R"
    exit 1
fi
19

By far the simplest solution:

if id -u "$user" >/dev/null 2>&1; then
    echo 'user exists'
else
    echo 'user missing'
fi

The >/dev/null 2>&1 can be shortened to &>/dev/null in Bash, and if you only want to know if a user does not exist:

if ! id -u "$user" >/dev/null 2>&1; then
    echo 'user missing'
fi
1
  • 2
    The best answer
    – MestreLion
    Aug 16, 2020 at 3:36
14

I suggest to use id command as it tests valid user existence wrt passwd file entry which is not necessary means the same:

if [ `id -u $USER_TO_CHECK 2>/dev/null || echo -1` -ge 0 ]; then 
echo FOUND
fi

Note: 0 is root uid.

0
13

I was using it in that way:

if [ $(getent passwd $user) ] ; then
        echo user $user exists
else
        echo user $user doesn\'t exists
fi
1
  • 1
    A bad approach. You can get rid of both [ ] and $() and simply check for getent's exit code directly instead of using its output
    – MestreLion
    Aug 16, 2020 at 3:31
8

Script to Check whether Linux user exists or not

Script To check whether the user exists or not

#! /bin/bash
USER_NAME=bakul
cat /etc/passwd | grep ${USER_NAME} >/dev/null 2>&1
if [ $? -eq 0 ] ; then
    echo "User Exists"
else
    echo "User Not Found"
fi
3
  • 5
    Why use cat ? grep $USER_NAME /etc/passwd >/dev/null 2>&1 Dec 4, 2018 at 13:31
  • Yes Alexx Roche,there is no need to use cat,I have use in order to have better way to visualise the concept for beginner. Dec 5, 2018 at 5:52
  • Unneccary use of cat, dependent on nsswitch only being configured to use files. Oct 6, 2020 at 10:07
6

Late answer but finger also shows more information on user

  sudo apt-get finger 
  finger "$username"
1
4

user infomation is stored in /etc/passwd, so you can use "grep 'usename' /etc/passwd" to check if the username exist. meanwhile you can use "id" shell command, it will print the user id and group id, if the user does not exist, it will print "no such user" message.

1
  • IT is stored in /etc/passwd IF nsswitch.conf's passwd setting is set to files... This approach breaks if network-based logins are involved... Oct 6, 2020 at 10:09
4

Using sed:

username="alice"
if [ `sed -n "/^$username/p" /etc/passwd` ]
then
    echo "User [$username] already exists"
else
    echo "User [$username] doesn't exist"
fi
0
3

Actually I cannot reproduce the problem. The script as written in the question works fine, except for the case where $1 is empty.

However, there is a problem in the script related to redirection of stderr. Although the two forms &> and >& exist, in your case you want to use >&. You already redirected stdout, that's why the form &> does not work. You can easily verify it this way:

getent /etc/passwd username >/dev/null 2&>1
ls

You will see a file named 1 in the current directory. You want to use 2>&1 instead, or use this:

getent /etc/passwd username &>/dev/null

This also redirects stdout and stderr to /dev/null.

Warning Redirecting stderr to /dev/null might not be such a good idea. When things go wrong, you will have no clue why.

2

Depending on your shell implementation (e.g. Busybox vs. grown-up) the [ operator might start a process, changing $?.

Try

getent passwd $1 > /dev/null 2&>1
RES=$?

if [ $RES -eq 0 ]; then
    echo "yes the user exists"
else
    echo "No, the user does not exist"
fi
4
  • changing $? gives me the same output. This is the bash version: GNU bash, version 4.1.5(1)-release (i486-pc-linux-gnu) Feb 11, 2013 at 11:17
  • Try if test "$RES" == "0"; then ... Feb 11, 2013 at 12:00
  • 1
    $? would be expanded before [ runs, so that's not a problem.
    – chepner
    Feb 11, 2013 at 14:10
  • 2
    Instead of testing for the result of the command, you can test the command directly: if getent passwd $1 > /dev/null 2&>1; then echo "yes the user exists" else echo "No, the user does not exist" fi
    – GMartinez
    Sep 20, 2018 at 9:05
2

Login to the server. grep "username" /etc/passwd This will display the user details if present.

1
  • 4
    This will also match any username which contains "username". E.g. "some_username". You would want to do if grep -q "^username:" /etc/passwd; then ...
    – maedox
    Jun 12, 2018 at 10:58
1

Below is the script to check the OS distribution and create User if not exists and do nothing if user exists.

#!/bin/bash

# Detecting OS Ditribution
if [ -f /etc/os-release ]; then
    . /etc/os-release
    OS=$NAME
elif type lsb_release >/dev/null 2>&1; then
OS=$(lsb_release -si)
elif [ -f /etc/lsb-release ]; then
    . /etc/lsb-release
    OS=$DISTRIB_ID
else
    OS=$(uname -s)
fi

 echo "$OS"

 user=$(cat /etc/passwd | egrep -e ansible | awk -F ":" '{ print $1}')

 #Adding User based on The OS Distribution
 if [[ $OS = *"Red Hat"* ]] || [[ $OS = *"Amazon Linux"* ]] || [[ $OS = *"CentOS"*  
]] && [[ "$user" != "ansible" ]];then
 sudo useradd ansible

elif [ "$OS" =  Ubuntu ] && [ "$user" != "ansible" ]; then
sudo adduser --disabled-password --gecos "" ansible
else
  echo "$user is already exist on $OS"
 exit
fi
1

Create system user some_user if it doesn't exist

if [[ $(getent passwd some_user) = "" ]]; then
    sudo adduser --no-create-home --force-badname --disabled-login --disabled-password --system some_user
fi
1

I like this nice one line solution

getent passwd username > /dev/null 2&>1 && echo yes || echo no

and in script:

#!/bin/bash

if [ "$1" != "" ]; then
        getent passwd $1 > /dev/null 2&>1 && (echo yes; exit 0) || (echo no; exit 2)
else
        echo "missing username"
        exit -1
fi

use:

[mrfish@yoda ~]$ ./u_exists.sh root
yes
[mrfish@yoda ~]$ echo $?
0

[mrfish@yoda ~]$ ./u_exists.sh
missing username
[mrfish@yoda ~]$ echo $?
255

[mrfish@yoda ~]$ ./u_exists.sh aaa
no
[mrfish@indegy ~]$ echo $?
2
0
echo "$PASSWORD" | su -c "cd /" "$USER"
if [ "$?" = "0" ];then
 echo "OK"
else
 echo "Error"
fi
0
#!/bin/bash
read -p "Enter your Login Name: " loginname
home=`grep -w $loginname /etc/passwd | cut -ef:6 -d:`
if [ $home ]
    echo "Exists"
else
    echo "Not Exist"
fi

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