47

I have the following:

function checkPalindrom(palindrom)
{

    for( var i = palindrom.length; i > 0; i-- )
    {
        if( palindrom[i] = palindrom.charAt(palindrom.length)-1 )
        {
            document.write('the word is palindrome.');
        }else{
            document.write('the word is not palindrome!');
        }
    }
}
checkPalindrom('wordthatwillbechecked');

What is wrong with my code? I want to check if the word is a palindrome.

  • 8
    Why do you think there is something wrong with your code? What happens and what do you expect to happen? – Felix Kling Feb 11 '13 at 13:58
  • 2
    From wikipedia: "Allowances may be made for adjustments to capital letters, punctuation, and word dividers". – Mojtaba Jan 21 '16 at 18:01

40 Answers 40

157

Maybe I will suggest alternative solution:

function checkPalindrom (str) {
  return str == str.split('').reverse().join('');
}

UPD. Keep in mind however that this is pretty much "cheating" approach, a demonstration of smart usage of language features, but not the most practical algorithm (time O(n), space O(n)). For real life application or coding interview you should definitely use loop solution. The one posted by Jason Sebring in this thread is both simple and efficient (time O(n), space O(1)).

| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    This is clearly the simplest code, although maybe not the most efficient solution. But for someone writing code like the original, perhaps simpler steps toward a good solution are of better help than a leap toward a great solution? – Scott Sauyet Feb 11 '13 at 19:02
  • 3
    You are right. My variant is not teaching OP how to program (there are 5 other great answers more relevant to this original problem), i'm just showing different approach to the problem. And the ability to invent non-obvious ways is also very important. – dfsq Feb 11 '13 at 21:01
  • 5
    you need some extra code in there if the string has spaces or punctuation, fyi – Jason Aug 13 '14 at 19:00
  • 1
    revString("eye") => true while revString("race car") => false while a palindrome is a word or sentence that's spelled the same way both forward and backward, ignoring punctuation, case, and spacing. How we could improve this? – Hamza Bahlaouane Sep 1 '15 at 23:54
  • 1
    @HamzaBahlaouane The easiest way is to use .toLowerCase (or .toUpperCase) along with a regex that removes the problematic characters, before running the comparision. So, before line 2, add something like str = str.toLowerCase().replace( /[\s~`!@#$%^&*()-_+=[\]{}\\|:;"',<>.?\/\u2000-\u206F\u2E00-\u2E7F\u3000-\u303F]/g, ''); or, if you don't care about Unicode support, str = str.toLowerCase().replace(/\W/g, '') – trlkly May 5 '16 at 12:06
38

25x faster than the standard answer

function isPalindrome(s,i) {
 return (i=i||0)<0||i>=s.length>>1||s[i]==s[s.length-1-i]&&isPalindrome(s,++i);
}

use like:

isPalindrome('racecar');

as it defines "i" itself

Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/namcx0yf/9/

This is ~25 times faster than the standard answer below.

function checkPalindrome(str) {
  return str == str.split('').reverse().join('');
}

Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/t0zfjfab/2/

View console for performance results.

Although the solution is difficult to read and maintain, I would recommend understanding it to demonstrate non-branching with recursion and bit shifting to impress your next interviewer.

explained

The || and && are used for control flow like "if" "else". If something left of || is true, it just exits with true. If something is false left of || it must continue. If something left of && is false, it exits as false, if something left of a && is true, it must continue. This is considered "non-branching" as it does not need if-else interupts, rather its just evaluated.

1. Used an initializer not requiring "i" to be defined as an argument. Assigns "i" to itself if defined, otherwise initialize to 0. Always is false so next OR condition is always evaluated.

(i = i || 0) < 0

2. Checks if "i" went half way but skips checking middle odd char. Bit shifted here is like division by 2 but to lowest even neighbor division by 2 result. If true then assumes palindrome since its already done. If false evaluates next OR condition.

i >= s.length >> 1

3. Compares from beginning char and end char according to "i" eventually to meet as neighbors or neighbor to middle char. If false exits and assumes NOT palindrome. If true continues on to next AND condition.

s[i] == s[s.length-1-i]

4. Calls itself again for recursion passing the original string as "s". Since "i" is defined for sure at this point, it is pre-incremented to continue checking the string's position. Returns boolean value indicating if palindrome.

isPalindrome(s,++i)

BUT...

A simple for loop is still about twice as fast as my fancy answer (aka KISS principle)

function fastestIsPalindrome(str) {
  var len = Math.floor(str.length / 2);
  for (var i = 0; i < len; i++)
    if (str[i] !== str[str.length - i - 1])
      return false;
  return true;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/6L953awz/1/

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This returns false: console.log(isPalindrome('Avid diva')); – ErickBest Sep 1 '14 at 11:59
  • 6
    isPalindrome('Avid diva'.toLowerCase()) returns true. – Wildhoney May 12 '15 at 10:58
  • 44
    25 times uglier – Chris Hawkes Aug 19 '16 at 20:48
  • 8
    @ChrisHawkes I agree 100%. The main point was to educate on language features and also provide the point at the bottom showing that plain programming is both faster and easier to look at. – Jason Sebring Aug 19 '16 at 20:57
  • 3
    Yeah I should clarify it was extremely crafty and way over my head :) – Chris Hawkes Aug 19 '16 at 20:58
11

First problem

= is assign == is compare

Second problem, Your logic here is wrong

palindrom.charAt(palindrom.length)-1

You are subtracting one from the charAt and not the length.

Third problem, it still will be wrong since you are not reducing the length by i.

| improve this answer | |
10

It works to me

function palindrome(str) {
  /* remove special characters, spaces and make lowercase*/
  var removeChar = str.replace(/[^A-Z0-9]/ig, "").toLowerCase();

  /* reverse removeChar for comparison*/
  var checkPalindrome = removeChar.split('').reverse().join('');

  /* Check to see if str is a Palindrome*/
   return (removeChar === checkPalindrome);
}
| improve this answer | |
9

SHORTEST CODE (31 chars)(ES6):

p=s=>s==[...s].reverse().join``
p('racecar'); //true

Keep in mind short code isn't necessarily the best. Readability and efficiency can matter more.

| improve this answer | |
8

The logic here is not quite correct, you need to check every letter to determine if the word is a palindrome. Currently, you print multiple times. What about doing something like:

function checkPalindrome(word) {    
    var l = word.length;
    for (var i = 0; i < l / 2; i++) {
        if (word.charAt(i) !== word.charAt(l - 1 - i)) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

if (checkPalindrome("1122332211")) {
    document.write("The word is a palindrome");
} else {
    document.write("The word is NOT a palindrome");
}

Which should print that it IS indeed a palindrome.

| improve this answer | |
  • @MG_Bautista both do different things, just like == and ===. – KBN Feb 11 '13 at 14:18
  • !== does a type check on the inequality and in Javascript it is generally good practise to always use type checking operators. – BeRecursive Feb 11 '13 at 14:21
  • As an aside, you'd probably want i < word.length / 2, since any iterations after halfway through the word are redundant. – Andy E Feb 11 '13 at 14:40
  • @AndyE agreed, a poor oversight on my part in an attempt at speed – BeRecursive Feb 11 '13 at 14:43
  • The way it is, if (checkPalindrome("Avid diva")) { will print:The word is NOT a palindrome You need to force lowercase to cover words that have capitals... word = word.toLowerCase() .. Hope it helps. – ErickBest Sep 1 '14 at 12:07
6

At least three things:

  • You are trying to test for equality with =, which is used for setting. You need to test with == or ===. (Probably the latter, if you don't have a reason for the former.)

  • You are reporting results after checking each character. But you don't know the results until you've checked enough characters.

  • You double-check each character-pair, as you really only need to check if, say first === last and not also if last === first.

| improve this answer | |
5

As a much clearer recursive function: http://jsfiddle.net/dmz2x117/

function isPalindrome(letters) {

    var characters  = letters.split(''),
        firstLetter = characters.shift(),
        lastLetter  = characters.pop();

    if (firstLetter !== lastLetter) {
        return false;
    }

    if (characters.length < 2) {
        return true;
    }

    return isPalindrome(characters.join(''));

}
| improve this answer | |
4
function checkPalindrom(palindrom)
{
   var flag = true;
   var j = 0;
    for( var i = palindrom.length-1; i > palindrom.length / 2; i-- )
    {
        if( palindrom[i] != palindrom[j] )
        {
           flag = false;
           break; // why this? It'll exit the loop at once when there is a mismatch.
        }
        j++;
    }
  if( flag ) {
  document.write('the word is palindrome.');
  }
  else {
document.write('the word is not palindrome.');
  }
}
checkPalindrom('wordthatwillbechecked');

Why am I printing the result outside the loop? Otherwise, for each match in the word, it'll print "is or is not pallindrome" rather than checking the whole word.

EDIT: Updated with changes and a fix suggested by Basemm.

| improve this answer | |
  • That won't work as you need to start from "length-1". also for efficiency u should stop at middle of string and not checking the whole string – Basemm Dec 27 '13 at 1:46
4

I've added some more to the above functions, to check strings like, "Go hang a salami, I'm a lasagna hog".

function checkPalindrom(str) {
    var str = str.replace(/[^a-zA-Z0-9]+/gi, '').toLowerCase();
    return str == str.split('').reverse().join('');
}

Thanks

| improve this answer | |
4

The most important thing to do when solving a Technical Test is Don't use shortcut methods -- they want to see how you think algorithmically! Not your use of methods.

Here is one that I came up with (45 minutes after I blew the test). There are a couple optimizations to make though. When writing any algorithm, its best to assume false and alter the logic if its looking to be true.

isPalindrome():

Basically, to make this run in O(N) (linear) complexity you want to have 2 iterators whose vectors point towards each other. Meaning, one iterator that starts at the beginning and one that starts at the end, each traveling inward. You could have the iterators traverse the whole array and use a condition to break/return once they meet in the middle, but it may save some work to only give each iterator a half-length by default.

for loops seem to force the use of more checks, so I used while loops - which I'm less comfortable with.

Here's the code:

/**
 * TODO: If func counts out, let it return 0
 *  * Assume !isPalindrome (invert logic)
 */
function isPalindrome(S){
    var s = S
      , len = s.length
      , mid = len/2;
      , i = 0, j = len-1;

    while(i<mid){
        var l = s.charAt(i);
        while(j>=mid){
            var r = s.charAt(j);
            if(l === r){
                console.log('@while *', i, l, '...', j, r);
                --j;
                break;
            }
            console.log('@while !', i, l, '...', j, r);
            return 0;
        }
        ++i;
    }
    return 1;
}

var nooe = solution('neveroddoreven');  // even char length
var kayak = solution('kayak');  // odd char length
var kayaks = solution('kayaks');

console.log('@isPalindrome', nooe, kayak, kayaks);

Notice that if the loops count out, it returns true. All the logic should be inverted so that it by default returns false. I also used one short cut method String.prototype.charAt(n), but I felt OK with this as every language natively supports this method.

| improve this answer | |
4
function palindromCheck(str) {
    var palinArr, i,
        palindrom = [],

    palinArr = str.split(/[\s!.?,;:'"-()]/ig);

    for (i = 0; i < palinArr.length; i++) {
        if (palinArr[i].toLowerCase() === palinArr[i].split('').reverse().join('').toLowerCase() &&
            palinArr[i] !== '') {
            palindrom.push(palinArr[i]);
        }
    }
        return palindrom.join(', ');
}
console.log(palindromCheck('There is a man, his name! was Bob.')); //a, Bob

Finds and upper to lower case. Split string into array, I don't know why a few white spaces remain, but I wanted to catch and single letters.

| improve this answer | |
3
  • = in palindrom[i] = palindrom.charAt(palindrom.length)-1 should be == or ===
  • palindrom.charAt(palindrom.length)-1 should be palindrom.charAt(palindrom.length - i)
| improve this answer | |
3

Sharing my fast variant which also support spaces

function isPalindrom(str) {
  var ia = 0;
  var ib = str.length - 1;
  do {
    if (str[ia] === str[ib]) continue;

    // if spaces skip & retry
    if (str[ia] === ' ' && ib++) continue;
    if (str[ib] === ' ' && ia--) continue;

    return false;
  } while (++ia < --ib);
  return true;
}
var palindrom="never odd or even";
var res = isPalindrom(palindrom);
document.getElementById('check').innerHTML ='"'+ palindrom + '"'+" checked to be :" +res;
<span id="check" />

| improve this answer | |
2
function checkPalindrom(palindrom)
{
  palindrom= palindrom.toLowerCase();
   var flag = true;
   var j;
   j = (palindrom.length) -1 ;
   //console.log(j);
   var cnt = j / 2;
   //console.log(cnt);
    for( i = 0; i < cnt+1 ; i++,j-- )
    {
        console.log("J is => "+j);
        console.log(palindrom[i] + "<==>" + palindrom[j]);
        if( palindrom[i] != palindrom[j] )
        {
           flag = false;
           break; 
        }


    }
  if( flag ) {
  console.log('the word is palindrome.');
  }
  else {
console.log('the word is not palindrome.');
  }
}
checkPalindrom('Avid diva');
| improve this answer | |
  • Hi @weborion, could you explain your answer? You'll notice that petty much all the other answers have done accompanying text describing how they did what they did, any drawbacks, etc. Code-only answers are usually best avoided because they only serve to give a solution, and not help somebody learn from it as readily. – Wai Ha Lee Apr 26 '15 at 23:43
  • Hi Lee , Sorry new to StackOverFlow commenting , The Logic is it uses two pointers one run from Front (i.e. i=0 )and Another run from end (j= (palindrom.length) -1) , Front will go in upward direction and End in reverse, We do not need to check for whole array .So cnt= j/2 which is middle of array. Then check array[front-ponter] is equals array[end-ponter] if not end the loop if at the middle all the characters match string is Palindrome. Sorry With Code I was not able to put the comments earlier. – weborion Apr 28 '15 at 1:34
2

I'm wondering why nobody suggested this:

ES6:

// "aba" -> true
// "acb" -> false
// "aa" -> true
// "abba" -> true
// "s" -> true
isPalindrom = (str = "") => {
  if (str[0] === str[str.length - 1]) {
    return str.length <= 1 ? true : isPalindrom(str.slice(1, -1))
  }

  return false;
}

alert(["aba", "acb", "aa", "abba", "s"].map((e, i) => isPalindrom(e)).join())

ES5:

// "aba" -> true
// "acb" -> false
// "aa" -> true
// "abba" -> true
// "s" -> true
function isPalindrom(str) => {
  var str = typeof str !== "string" ? "" : str;

  if (str[0] === str[str.length - 1]) {
    return str.length <= 1 ? true : isPalindrom(str.slice(1, -1))
  }

  return false;
}

alert(["aba", "acb", "aa", "abba", "s"].map(function (e, i) {
    return isPalindrom(e);
}).join());
| improve this answer | |
2

Recursive Method:

var low;
var high;
var A = "abcdcba";  

function palindrome(A , low, high){
  A = A.split('');

 if((low > high) || (low == high)){
   return true;
 }

 if(A[low] === A[high]){
   A = A.join('');
   low = low + 1; 
   high = high - 1; 
   return palindrome(A , low, high);
 }
 else{
   return "not a palindrome";
 }
}

palindrome(A, 0, A.length-1);
| improve this answer | |
2

I thought I'd share my own solution:

function palindrome(string){
    var reverseString = '';
    for(var k in string){
       reverseString += string[(string.length - k) - 1];
    }
  if(string === reverseString){
    console.log('Hey there palindrome');
  }else{
    console.log('You are not a palindrome');
  }
}
palindrome('ana');

Hope will help someone.

| improve this answer | |
2

Some above short anwsers is good, but it's not easy for understand, I suggest one more way:

function checkPalindrome(inputString) {

    if(inputString.length == 1){
        return true;
    }else{
        var i = 0;
        var j = inputString.length -1;
        while(i < j){
            if(inputString[i] != inputString[j]){
                return false;
            }
            i++;
            j--;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

I compare each character, i start form left, j start from right, until their index is not valid (i<j). It's also working in any languages

| improve this answer | |
2

You can try the following

function checkPalindrom (str) {
      str = str.toLowerCase();
      return str == str.split('').reverse().join('');
    }

    if(checkPalindrom('Racecar')) {
        console.log('Palindrome');
    } else {
        console.log('Not Palindrome');
    }
| improve this answer | |
1

I found this on an interview site:

Write an efficient function that checks whether any permutation of an input string is a palindrome. You can ignore punctuation, we only care about the characters.

Playing around with it I came up with this ugly piece of code :)

function checkIfPalindrome(text) {
    var found = {};
    var foundOne = 0;
    text = text.replace(/[^a-z0-9]/gi, '').toLowerCase();
    for (var i = 0; i < text.length; i++) {
        if (found[text[i]]) {
            found[text[i]]++;
        } else {
            found[text[i]] = 1;
        }
    }
    for (var x in found) {
        if (found[x] === 1) {
            foundOne++;
            if (foundOne > 1) {
                return false;
            }
        }
    }
    for (var x in found) {
        if (found[x] > 2 && found[x] % 2 && foundOne) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

Just leaving it here for posterity.

| improve this answer | |
1

How about this, using a simple flag

function checkPalindrom(str){
   var flag = true;
   for( var i = 0; i <= str.length-1; i++){
    if( str[i] !== str[str.length - i-1]){
      flag = false;  
     }
    }
    if(flag == false){
      console.log('the word is not a palindrome!');   
    }
    else{
    console.log('the word is a palindrome!');
    }
}

checkPalindrom('abcdcba');
| improve this answer | |
  • There's no point to continue iterating if flag is ever set to false – ie, just return false immediately whenever the characters don't match – Thank you May 31 '17 at 0:12
1

(JavaScript) Using regexp, this checks for alphanumeric palindrome and disregards space and punctuation.

function palindrome(str) {
  str = str.match(/[A-Za-z0-9]/gi).join("").toLowerCase();
  //  (/[A-Za-z0-9]/gi) above makes str alphanumeric

  for(var i = 0; i < Math.floor(str.length/2); i++) { //only need to run for half the string length 
    if(str.charAt(i) !== str.charAt(str.length-i-1)) { // uses !== to compare characters one-by-one from the beginning and end
      return "Try again.";
    }
  }
  return "Palindrome!";
}
palindrome("A man, a plan, a canal. Panama.");
//palindrome("4_2 (: /-\ :) 2-4"); // This solution would also work on something like this.
| improve this answer | |
1
`
function checkPalindrome (str) {
    var str = str.toLowerCase();
    var original = str.split(' ').join('');
    var reversed = original.split(' ').reverse().join('');

  return (original === reversed);
}
`
| improve this answer | |
1

This avoids regex while also dealing with strings that have spaces and uppercase...

function isPalindrome(str) {
    str = str.split("");

    var str2 = str.filter(function(x){ 
        if(x !== ' ' && x !== ',') {
            return x;
        }
    });

    return console.log(str2.join('').toLowerCase()) == console.log(str2.reverse().join('').toLowerCase());
};

isPalindrome("A car, a man, a maraca"); //true
| improve this answer | |
1
function myPolidrome(polidrome){
 var string=polidrome.split('').join(',');
 for(var i=0;i<string.length;i++){
    if(string.length==1){
     console.log("is polidrome");
   }else if(string[i]!=string.charAt(string.length-1)){
     console.log("is not polidrome");
     break;
  }else{
     return  myPolidrome(polidrome.substring(1,polidrome.length-1));
  }
  }
  }
myPolidrome("asasdsdsa");
| improve this answer | |
1

Thought I will share my solution using Array.prototype.filter(). filter() filters the array based on boolean values the function returns.

var inputArray=["","a","ab","aba","abab","ababa"]
var outputArray=inputArray.filter(function isPalindrome(x){
  if (x.length<2) return true;
  var y=x.split("").reverse().join("");
  return x==y;
})
console.log(outputArray);
| improve this answer | |
1

This worked for me.

var number = 8008
number = number + "";
numberreverse = number.split("").reverse().join('');
console.log ("The number if reversed is: " +numberreverse);
if (number == numberreverse)
    console.log("Yes, this is a palindrome");
else
    console.log("Nope! It isnt a palindrome");
| improve this answer | |
1

Here is a solution that works even if the string contains non-alphanumeric characters.

function isPalindrome(str) {
    str = str.toLowerCase().replace(/\W+|_/g, '');
    return str == str.split('').reverse().join('');
}
| improve this answer | |
1

Writing the code for checking palindromes following the best practices of JavaScript:

(function(){
	'use strict';
	
	var testStringOne = "Madam";
	var testStringTwo = "testing";
	var testNull = null;
	var testUndefined;
	
	console.log(checkIfPalindrome(testStringOne));
	console.log(checkIfPalindrome(testStringTwo));
	console.log(checkIfPalindrome(testNull));
	console.log(checkIfPalindrome(testUndefined));
	
	function checkIfPalindrome(testStringOne){
		
		if(!testStringOne){
			return false;
		}
		
		var testArrayOne = testStringOne.toLowerCase().split("");
		testArrayOne.reverse();
		
		if(testArrayOne.toString() == testStringOne.toLowerCase().split("").toString()){
			return true;
		}else{
			return false;
		}
	}
	
})();

| improve this answer | |

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