I have an absolutely positioned block of text inside a relatively positioned container. The absolutely positioned element exceeds the right boundary of its container.

The problem is: the text isn't wrapping as normal; it's breaking prematurely rather than expanding to its defined max-width:

Observed behavior:

enter image description here

Desired behavior

enter image description here

HTML/CSS (JSFIDDLE: http://jsfiddle.net/WmcjM/):

<style>
.container {
    position: relative;
    width: 300px;
    background: #ccc;
    height: 100px;
}

.text {
    position: absolute;
    max-width: 150px;
    left: 290px;
    top: 10px;
    background: lightblue;
}
</style>

<div class="container">
    <div class="text">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</div>
</div>

Note: A couple changes that appear to achieve the desired behavior, but which aren't quite what I'm looking for, include:

  • defining min-width: 150px on .text (the text might just be one word, and I don't want the container to be oversized)
  • positioning .text. relative to document, rather than to .container (it needs to appear beside the container, even when the browser is resized)
up vote 12 down vote accepted

Try using position: relative; on .text

EDIT: Also put it inside an absolute positioned wrapper with your custom max-width

CSS

.container {
    position: relative;
    width: 300px;
    background: #ccc;
    height: 300px;
}

.wrap_text {
    position: absolute;
    max-width: 200px;
    top: 10px;
}

.text {
    position: relative;
    left: 290px;
    background: lightblue;
}

And HTML:

<div class="container">
    <div class="wrap_text">
        <div class="text">
            Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

change the absolute position to relative, and wrap .text in an absolutely positioned element.

http://jsfiddle.net/WmcjM/4/

.container {
    position: relative;
    width: 300px;
    background: #ccc;
    height: 300px;
}

.text {
    position: relative;
    /*min-width: 200px;*/
    left: 290px;
    background: lightblue;
}

.wrap {
    position: absolute;
    max-width: 200px;
    top: 10px;
}
  • Interesting.. why does this work? What is the defined behavior for a position: relative element inside another position: relative element? – Emmett Feb 11 '13 at 19:53
  • setting position:absolute removes the element from the normal flow of the document structure, therefore it doesn't know how wide to be. – Bogdan Rybak Feb 11 '13 at 19:56
  • 1
    Right, but it does seem to "know how wide to be" if .text has left: 0 instead of left: 290px (i.e. when the text box doesn't exceed the container's boundary). – Emmett Feb 11 '13 at 20:00
  • Also, this solution only appears to work since there's nothing else in the container, and the text box's default position is 0,0. If I add other elements to the the container, then the text box is shifted from where I'd like it to appear. – Emmett Feb 11 '13 at 20:01
  • To solve that you can wrap .text in an absolutely positioned element that has a width defined (this would be your preferred "max-width") – Bogdan Rybak Feb 11 '13 at 20:07

Here is a strategy that you can use that should work in Chrome, FF, Safari, and IE11 when I tested it last.

Basically, the idea is to trick the browser to think that you have the width. The previous answers work fine, but if you shrink the parent container's width, you will notice that your content starts to wrap when it hits the width of that parent container. So the idea to get around this is to use another container that is positioned where you want to anchor your content to, and then position your content with respect to that thing.

The difference here is we will use that first positioned container to set our desired max width. Since that container has 0 height, you won't even see it.

JSFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/WmcjM/252/

HTML

<div class="container">
  <div class="sizing-container">
      <div class="your-text">You can put whatever you want here and you can see that the content wraps when you hit your max-width, but that max-width is actually defined as the width of the sizing container</div>
  </div>
</div>

CSS

.container {
    position: relative;
    background: #ccc;
    width: 70px;
    height: 70px;
    margin-bottom: 100px;
}

.your-text {
    position: absolute;
    left: 0;
    top: 100%;
    background: lightblue;
    word-break: break-word;
}

.sizing-container {
    position: absolute;
    display: block;
    height: 0px;
    background: red;
    width: 200px; // This is your max-width!
    top: 16px;
    left: 100%;
}

.container {
    position: relative;
    background: #ccc;
    width: 70px;
    height: 70px;
    margin-bottom: 100px;
}

.monkaS {
    position: absolute;
    left: 0;
    top: 100%;
    background: lightblue;
    word-break: break-word;
}

.poggers {
    position: absolute;
    display: block;
/*     height: 1px; comment this in to see whats happening*/ 
    height: 0px;
    background: red;
    width: 200px;
    top: 16px;
    left: 100%;
}
<div class="container">
  <div class="poggers">
      <div class="monkaS">Standard shit pogchamp chatlethal</div>
  </div>
</div>

<div class="container">
  <div class="poggers">
      <div class="monkaS">P O G G E R S P O G G E R S P O G G E R S P O G G E R S P O G G E R S P O G G E R S P O G G E R S P O G G E R S P O G G E R S P O G G E R S P O G G E R S</div>
  </div>
</div>

<div class="container">
  <div class="poggers">
      <div class="monkaS">Short</div>
  </div>
</div>

<div class="container">
  <div class="poggers">
      <div class="monkaS">ReallyLongReallyLongReallyLongReallyLongReallyLongReallyLongReallyLongReallyLongReallyLongReallyLongReallyLong</div>
  </div>
</div>

Try to use transform: translate(x, y); instead of position: absolute; left: x; top: y;

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