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I have developed an Android app that requires root access, and it works fine. I am trying to test the app using instrumentation tests with ActivityInstrumentationTestCase2 and cover the parts of the app that utilize root access. The tests should be fully automated as they will run on our CI. The CI build creates a fresh emulator, and then it roots the emulator using the following commands:

adb -e install superuser.apk
adb shell mount -o rw,remount -t yaffs2 /dev/block/mtdblock03 /system 
adb push su /system/xbin/su 
adb shell chmod 06755 /system 
adb shell chmod 06755 /system/xbin/su

It works OK, but at some point I have to click "Allow" button on the Superuser's root access prompt when the test requires it. My problem is how to execute those tests without manual clicking the "Allow" button and gain the root access.

If I try to click this button from instrumentation test using the following code

instrumentation.sendKeyDownUpSync(KeyEvent.KEYCODE_DPAD_CENTER);

I get

java.lang.SecurityException: 
Injecting to another application requires INJECT_EVENTS permission

Apparently, this privilege is used only by system apps, and I cannot authorize my apps with this permission. Maybe I am doing something wrong here?

Another idea is to pre-authorize the app during the emulator boot from command line, but I haven't found the way for this.

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You are going to have lots of issues with your approach, You could automate the button press using a different framework other than instrumentation (e.g. monkey/http://developer.android.com/tools/testing/testing_ui.html) but my vote for you would be to utilise snapshots/a custom disk image for your emulator, create your own snapshot/image that has the phone rooted and then you probably can should be able launch the emulator and tell it to use the snapshot that has root access already.

  • Thanks for your reply. The button pressing automation works actually. I could use Monkey instead of instrumentation but the problem is not there. The button gets pressed already. Emulators are actually rooted, you have root access on every emulator. The approach I gave above gives root access to apk installed on emulator. More info here. Besides the tests should run on our CI with maven, so I don't see how disk images will help in the given context. – Amir Jamak Feb 19 '13 at 18:35
  • You manage to press the button? Are you sure? java.lang.SecurityException: Injecting to another application requires INJECT_EVENTS permission happens when you try to touch/send a button to an application you cannot control because it is out of your process. with a disk image you could preauthorise your application to have root access and then install a new version which would save you having to give it permission again. Or does it ask you to reauthorise after every reinstall of your application? – Paul Harris Feb 19 '13 at 19:12
  • Well I managed to "try" to press the button, that is what instrumentation does. For this reason I think I don't see why switch to Monkey. The problem with disk images is that I have to build the test application and deploy it on-the-fly to the emulator. This process is managed by our CI (Jenkins) and it is triggered every time someone commits the code to repo. This happens several times per hour. So what should I do? Make an image during every build process? – Amir Jamak Feb 20 '13 at 8:03
  • the emulator copys uses a base android image everytime, you can tell it to use a snapshot, on tha snapshot you could of preauthorised your application maybe? The difference between monkey and instrumentation is instrumentation can only click on elements that are within the same process ID as the application you are instrumenting, the box you are trying to click is not in the instrumented application so it throws an error, monkey on the other hand has no such restriction so can in fact press the button. you could even use adb to send a key event to confirm the dialog if you wanted. – Paul Harris Feb 20 '13 at 9:28
  • OK, will try the Monkey and get back to you. – Amir Jamak Feb 23 '13 at 12:31

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