115

I need to draw a horizontal line after some block, and I have three ways to do it:

1) Define a class h_line and add css features to it, like

#css
.hline { width:100%; height:1px; background: #fff }

#html
<div class="block_1">Lorem</div> <div class="h_line"></div>

2) Use hr tag

#css
hr { width:100%; height:1px; background: #fff }

#html
<div class="block_1">Lorem</div> <hr />

3) use it like a after pseudoclass

#css
.hline:after { width:100%; height:1px; background: #fff; content:"" }

#html
<div class="block_1 h_line">Lorem</div>

Which way is the most practical?

  • 1
    I would think the <hr> is the most semantic. I mean, isn't that what it's meant for? – j08691 Feb 11 '13 at 21:24
  • 3
    why not use border-bottom? – jsweazy Feb 11 '13 at 21:24
  • 3
    In HTML5 the HTML <hr> element represents a thematic break between paragraph-level elements (for example, a change of scene in a story, or a shift of topic with a section). – Scott Simpson Feb 11 '13 at 21:44
127

hr {
    display: block;
    height: 1px;
    border: 0;
    border-top: 1px solid #ccc;
    margin: 1em 0;
    padding: 0;
}
<div>Hello</div>
<hr/>
<div>World</div>

Here is how html5boilerplate does it:

hr {
    display: block;
    height: 1px;
    border: 0;
    border-top: 1px solid #ccc;
    margin: 1em 0;
    padding: 0;
}
  • 2
    Note: Use margin: 1em auto if you want it to always be in the center of the page. – Jacques Marais Dec 1 '15 at 6:52
  • 1
    @JacquesMarais, not sure that's necessary as it is a block element with no defined width so it would span the width of the entire container anyway. – moettinger Feb 24 '16 at 19:30
65

I'd go for semantic markup, use an <hr/>.

Unless it's just a border what you want, then you can use a combination of padding, border and margin, to get the desired bound.

  • 8
    <hr> is valid HTML5. It used represent a horizontal rule, but is now defined in semantic terms as a thematic break between content. Most browsers will still display it as a horizontal line unless told otherwise. Source: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/HTML/Element/hr – AJMaxwell Jun 30 '16 at 20:12
  • Title says horizontal line and <hr/> is that so I up this. Title maybe should have read styled horizontal line. – Ryan Bayne Aug 18 '16 at 15:29
11

In HTML5, the <hr> tag defines a thematic break. In HTML 4.01, the <hr> tag represents a horizontal rule.

http://www.w3schools.com/tags/tag_hr.asp

So after definition, I would prefer <hr>

8

If you really want a thematic break, by all means use the <hr> tag.


If you just want a design line, you could use something like the css class

.hline-bottom {
    padding-bottom: 10px;
    border-bottom: 2px solid #000; /* whichever color you prefer */
}

and use it like

<div class="block_1 hline-bottom">Cheese</div>
2

.line {
  width: 53px;
  height: 0;
  border: 1px solid #C4C4C4;
  margin: 3px;
  display:inline-block;
}
<html>
<body>
<div class="line"></div>
<div style="display:inline-block;">OR</div>
<div class="line"></div>
</body>
</html>

1

My simple solution is to style hr with css to have zero top & bottom margins, zero border, 1 pixel height and contrasting background color. This can be done by setting the style directly or by defining a class, for example, like:

.thin_hr {
margin-top:0;
margin-bottom:0;
border:0;
height:1px;
background-color:black;
}
1

it is depends on requirement , but many developers suggestions is to make your code as simple as possible . so, go with simple "hr" tag and CSS code for that.

1

I wanted a long dash like line, so I used this.

.dash{
        border: 1px solid red;
        width: 120px;
        height: 0px;

}
<div class="dash"></div>

0

hr {
    display: block;
    height: 1px;
    border: 0;
    border-top: 1px solid #ccc;
    margin: 1em 0;
    padding: 0;
}
<div>Hello</div>
<hr/>
<div>World</div>
emphasized text

  • Please add a comment explaining your answer. – Barthy Feb 6 '18 at 0:34

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