14

I'd like to create a TypeConverter for a generic class, like this:

[TypeConverter(typeof(WrapperConverter<T>))]
public class Wrapper<T> 
{

   public T Value 
   {
      // get & set 
   }

   // other methods

}


public class WrapperConverter<T> : TypeConverter<T>
{

   // only support To and From strings
   public override bool CanConvertFrom(ITypeDescriptorContext context, Type sourceType)
   {
      if (sourceType == typeof(string))
      {
         return true;
      }
      return base.CanConvertFrom(context, sourceType);
   }

   public override bool CanConvertTo(ITypeDescriptorContext context, Type destinationType)
   {
      if (destinationType == typeof(string))
      {
         return true;
      }
      return base.CanConvertTo(context, destinationType);
   }

   public override object ConvertFrom(ITypeDescriptorContext context, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture, object value)
   {
      if (value is string)           
      {
         TypeConverter converter = TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(typeof(T));
         T inner = converter.ConvertTo(value, destinationType);
         return new Wrapper<T>(inner);
      }
      return base.ConvertFrom(context, culture, value);
   }

   public override object ConvertTo(ITypeDescriptorContext context, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture, object value, Type destinationType)
   {
      if (destinationType == typeof(System.String))
      {
         Wrapper<T> wrapper = value as Wrapper<T>();
         TypeConverter converter = TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(typeof(T));
         return converter.ConvertTo(wrapper.Value, destinationType);
      }   
      return base.ConvertTo(context, culture, value, destinationType);
   }
}

The problem comes in that you cannot have a generic in this line, it is disallowed:

[TypeConverter(typeof(WrapperConverter<T>))]
public class Wrapper<T> 

My next approach was to try to define a single, non-generic Converter that could handle any Wrapper<T> instances. The mix of both reflection and generics has me stumped on how to implement both the ConvertTo and ConvertFrom methods.

So for example, my ConvertTo looks like this:

public override object ConvertTo(ITypeDescriptorContext context, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture, object value, Type destinationType)
{
   if (destinationType == typeof(System.String)           
       && value.GetType().IsGenericType)
   {

       // 1.  How do I enforce that value is a Wrapper<T> instance?

       Type innerType = value.GetType().GetGenericArguments()[0];

       TypeConverter converter = TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(innerType);

       // 2.  How do I get to the T Value property?  Introduce an interface that Wrapper<T> implements maybe?
       object innerValue = ??? 

       return converter.ConvertTo(innerValue, destinationType);


   }
   return base.ConvertTo(context, culture, value, destinationType);
}

In ConvertFrom I have the biggest problem because I have no way to know which Wrapper class to convert the incomming strings into.

I've created several custome types and TypeConverters for use with the ASP.NET 4 Web API framework, and that is where I need this to be used as well.

One other thing I tried was to assign my generic version of the Converter at runtime as seen here, but the WebAPI framework did not respect it (meaning, the converter was never created).

One last note, I'm using .NET 4.0 and VS 2010.

  • I have solved this problem before, I believe I used dynamic to cast the T and used typeof also. I should be able to post my solution tomorrow, as I don't have the code accessible at this moment. – awright18 Feb 12 '13 at 4:46
  • stackoverflow.com/questions/557340/… Does this help? – awright18 Feb 12 '13 at 4:50
  • @awright18 Thanks, but i didn't have what I needed. My question is mostly how to create and associate a TypeConverter for a generic type. – tcarvin Feb 12 '13 at 13:30
38

I solved this by creating an single Converter that could hanlde all of the types derrived from my generic class. The big issue of knowing the generic arg T within the ConvertFrom was solved by capturing the information in the constructor as seen below.

public MyGenericConverter(Type type)
{
    if (type.IsGenericType 
        && type.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(MyGenericClass<>)
        && type.GetGenericArguments().Length == 1)
    {
        _genericInstanceType = type;
        _innerType = type.GetGenericArguments()[0];
        _innerTypeConverter = TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(_innerType);            
    }
    else
    {
        throw new ArgumentException("Incompatible type", "type");
    }
}

It took me ages to discover that the .NET infrastructure reflectively calls this constructor overload if it is defined. It was not part of the documented TypeConverter class.

Hope this all helps the next guy.

  • 3
    Nice! Thanks for the tip. Solved my problem too where I didn't think I could conclusively know the target type. Though presumably if not documented, may be subject to future breakage. – Phil Degenhardt Nov 8 '13 at 10:17
  • Hmmm, I'll take a look. That project is still in 4.0 so I cannot confirm if it only works in that version or not. – tcarvin Feb 13 '15 at 14:05
  • I guess the given answer works for you since ASP.NET might load the TypeConverter differently than WPF, which is what I was trying. WPF seems to be looking for a parameterless constructor. – Steven Jeuris Feb 13 '15 at 14:33
  • Could you post a full class? – rolls Nov 22 '17 at 5:49
5

Although @tcarvin's answer is very interesting - it works for me in .NET Framework 4.6.1 and from what I see in the code it should also work on .NET Core, there is an alternative solution using TypeDescriptionProviderAttribute that doesn't depend on that implementation detail he describes (constructor accepting parameter of type Type).

Having:

public class FooTypeConverter<T> : TypeConverter { ... }

public class FooTypeDescriptor : CustomTypeDescriptor
{
    private Type objectType;

    public FooTypeDescriptor(Type objectType)
    {
        this.objectType = objectType;
    }

    public override TypeConverter GetConverter()
    {
        var genericArg = objectType.GenericTypeArguments[0];
        var converterType = typeof(FooTypeConverter<>).MakeGenericType(genericArg);
        return (TypeConverter)Activator.CreateInstance(converterType);
    }
}

public class FooTypeDescriptionProvider : TypeDescriptionProvider
{
    public override ICustomTypeDescriptor GetTypeDescriptor(Type objectType, object instance)
    {
        return new FooTypeDescriptor(objectType);
    }
}

you just need to apply TypeDescriptionProviderAttribute to the target class like:

[TypeDescriptionProvider(typeof(FooTypeDescriptionProvider))]
public class Foo<T> { }

and then

TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(typeof(Foo)) will work as intended.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.