54

I have two models like this:

class User(models.Model):
    email = models.EmailField()

class Report(models.Model):
    user = models.ForeignKey(User)

In reality each model has more fields which are of no consequence to this question.

I want to filter all users who have an email which starts with 'a' and have no reports. There will be more .filter() and .exclude() criteria based on other fields.

I want to approach it like this:

users = User.objects.filter(email__like = 'a%')

users = users.filter(<other filters>)

users = ???

I would like ??? to filter out users who do not have reports associated with them. How would I do this? If this is not possible as I have presented it, what is an alternate approach?

86

Use isnull.

users_without_reports = User.objects.filter(report__isnull=True)
users_with_reports = User.objects.filter(report__isnull=False).distinct()

When you use isnull=False, the distinct() is required to prevent duplicate results.

  • 8
    This is OK, but it generates an OUTER JOIN with report in the case of both __isnull=True and __isnull=False. For the question about users with reports it may be less efficient than an INNER JOIN. I have found an ugly hack for exactly this case: User.objects.filter(report__id__gt=0).distinct(). This assumes IDs are > 0, which needs not be a case. Any better way of forcing an inner join, anyone? – Tomasz Gandor Apr 16 '14 at 7:22
  • @OrangeDog it would be useful to explain why it's better, even if that's as simple as "Using NOT EXISTS is (usually?) more efficient that doing a join" – Alasdair Oct 2 '18 at 15:03
  • @OrangeDog Fair point, but I was hoping you could confirm whether or not it gives better performance. Given that the question doesn't include any SQL, I'm not sure the OP specifically wanted a query using NOT EXISTS. – Alasdair Oct 2 '18 at 15:41
  • 1
    @Alasdair yes, it will almost always be faster to use WHERE NOT EXISTS than a DISTINCT ... OUTER JOIN, as it avoids the possibly gigantic intermediate result set. – OrangeDog Oct 2 '18 at 16:10
25

New in Django 1.11 you can add EXISTS subqueries:

User.objects.annotate(
    no_reports=~Exists(Reports.objects.filter(user__eq=OuterRef('pk')))
).filter(
    email__startswith='a',
    no_reports=True
)

This generates SQL something like this:

SELECT
    user.pk,
    user.email,
    NOT EXISTS (SELECT U0.pk FROM reports U0 WHERE U0.user = user.pk) AS no_reports
FROM user
WHERE email LIKE 'a%' AND NOT EXISTS (SELECT U0.pk FROM reports U0 WHERE U0.user = user.pk);

A NOT EXISTS clause is almost always the most efficient way to do a "not exists" filter.

Once #25367 is released, you'll be able to use ~Exists() directly in a .filter(), avoiding the duplicate clause.

  • This should be the top answer. Thank you @OrangeDog. – pupeno May 1 '19 at 12:09
11

The only way to get native SQL EXISTS/NOT EXISTS without extra queries or JOINs is to add it as raw SQL in the .extra() clause:

users = users.extra(where=[
    """NOT EXISTS(SELECT 1 FROM {reports} 
                  WHERE user_id={users}.id)
    """.format(reports=Report._meta.db_table, users=User._meta.db_table)
])

In fact, it's a pretty obvious and efficient solution and I sometimes wonder why it wasn't built in to Django as a lookup. Also it allows to refine the subquery to find e.g. only users with[out] a report during last week, or with[out] an unanswered/unviewed report.

  • 2
    @OrangeDog params can not be used to pass table names. They would be quoted by the DB engine. Also it is of no use to additionally secure the table names because they come from the code, not from user input. – Yuri Shatrov Aug 17 '18 at 20:14
  • what’s wrong with quoting table names? Depending on what they are they might need to be quoted. That’s one reason you should use params. – OrangeDog Aug 17 '18 at 20:17
  • 1
    @OrangeDog - because most database engines interpret single quotes as string literals - tables need to be double/angle quoted, or not quoted at all – Trent Aug 29 '18 at 0:28
3

Alasdair's answer is helpful, but I don't like using distinct(). It can sometimes be useful, but it's usually a code smell telling you that you messed up your joins.

Luckily, Django's queryset lets you filter on subqueries. With Django 3.0, you can also use an exists clause.

Here are a few ways to run the queries from your question:

# Tested with Django 3.0 and Python 3.6
import logging
import sys

import django
from django.apps import apps
from django.apps.config import AppConfig
from django.conf import settings
from django.db import connections, models, DEFAULT_DB_ALIAS
from django.db.models import Exists, OuterRef
from django.db.models.base import ModelBase

NAME = 'udjango'
DB_FILE = NAME + '.db'


def main():
    setup()

    class User(models.Model):
        email = models.EmailField()

        def __repr__(self):
            return 'User({!r})'.format(self.email)

    class Report(models.Model):
        user = models.ForeignKey(User, on_delete=models.CASCADE)

    syncdb(User)
    syncdb(Report)

    anne = User.objects.create(email='anne@example.com')
    User.objects.create(email='adam@example.com')
    alice = User.objects.create(email='alice@example.com')
    User.objects.create(email='bob@example.com')

    Report.objects.create(user=anne)
    Report.objects.create(user=alice)
    Report.objects.create(user=alice)

    logging.info('users without reports')
    logging.info(User.objects.filter(report__isnull=True, email__startswith='a'))

    logging.info('users with reports (allows duplicates)')
    logging.info(User.objects.filter(report__isnull=False, email__startswith='a'))

    logging.info('users with reports (no duplicates)')
    logging.info(User.objects.exclude(report__isnull=True).filter(email__startswith='a'))

    logging.info('users with reports (no duplicates, simpler SQL)')
    report_user_ids = Report.objects.values('user_id')
    logging.info(User.objects.filter(id__in=report_user_ids, email__startswith='a'))

    logging.info('users with reports (EXISTS clause, Django 3.0)')
    logging.info(User.objects.filter(
        Exists(Report.objects.filter(user_id=OuterRef('id'))),
        email__startswith='a'))

    logging.info('Done.')


def setup():
    with open(DB_FILE, 'w'):
        pass  # wipe the database
    settings.configure(
        DEBUG=True,
        DATABASES={
            DEFAULT_DB_ALIAS: {
                'ENGINE': 'django.db.backends.sqlite3',
                'NAME': DB_FILE}},
        LOGGING={'version': 1,
                 'disable_existing_loggers': False,
                 'formatters': {
                    'debug': {
                        'format': '%(asctime)s[%(levelname)s]'
                                  '%(name)s.%(funcName)s(): %(message)s',
                        'datefmt': '%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S'}},
                 'handlers': {
                    'console': {
                        'level': 'DEBUG',
                        'class': 'logging.StreamHandler',
                        'formatter': 'debug'}},
                 'root': {
                    'handlers': ['console'],
                    'level': 'INFO'},
                 'loggers': {
                    "django.db": {"level": "DEBUG"}}})
    app_config = AppConfig(NAME, sys.modules['__main__'])
    apps.populate([app_config])
    django.setup()
    original_new_func = ModelBase.__new__

    @staticmethod
    def patched_new(cls, name, bases, attrs):
        if 'Meta' not in attrs:
            class Meta:
                app_label = NAME
            attrs['Meta'] = Meta
        return original_new_func(cls, name, bases, attrs)
    ModelBase.__new__ = patched_new


def syncdb(model):
    """ Standard syncdb expects models to be in reliable locations.

    Based on https://github.com/django/django/blob/1.9.3
    /django/core/management/commands/migrate.py#L285
    """
    connection = connections[DEFAULT_DB_ALIAS]
    with connection.schema_editor() as editor:
        editor.create_model(model)


main()

If you put that into a Python file and run it, you should see something like this:

2019-12-06 11:45:17[DEBUG]django.db.backends.debug_sql(): (0.000) PRAGMA foreign_keys = OFF; args=None
2019-12-06 11:45:17[DEBUG]django.db.backends.debug_sql(): (0.000) PRAGMA foreign_keys; args=None
2019-12-06 11:45:17[DEBUG]django.db.backends.debug_sql(): (0.000) BEGIN; args=None
2019-12-06 11:45:17[DEBUG]django.db.backends.schema.execute(): CREATE TABLE "udjango_user" ("id" integer NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY AUTOINCREMENT, "email" varchar(254) NOT NULL); (params None)
2019-12-06 11:45:17[DEBUG]django.db.backends.debug_sql(): (0.000) CREATE TABLE "udjango_user" ("id" integer NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY AUTOINCREMENT, "email" varchar(254) NOT NULL); args=None
2019-12-06 11:45:17[DEBUG]django.db.backends.debug_sql(): (0.000) PRAGMA foreign_key_check; args=None
2019-12-06 11:45:17[DEBUG]django.db.backends.debug_sql(): (0.000) PRAGMA foreign_keys = ON; args=None
2019-12-06 11:45:17[DEBUG]django.db.backends.debug_sql(): (0.000) PRAGMA foreign_keys = OFF; args=None
2019-12-06 11:45:17[DEBUG]django.db.backends.debug_sql(): (0.000) PRAGMA foreign_keys; args=None
2019-12-06 11:45:17[DEBUG]django.db.backends.debug_sql(): (0.000) BEGIN; args=None
2019-12-06 11:45:17[DEBUG]django.db.backends.schema.execute(): CREATE TABLE "udjango_report" ("id" integer NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY AUTOINCREMENT, "user_id" integer NOT NULL REFERENCES "udjango_user" ("id") DEFERRABLE INITIALLY DEFERRED); (params None)
2019-12-06 11:45:17[DEBUG]django.db.backends.debug_sql(): (0.000) CREATE TABLE "udjango_report" ("id" integer NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY AUTOINCREMENT, "user_id" integer NOT NULL REFERENCES "udjango_user" ("id") DEFERRABLE INITIALLY DEFERRED); args=None
2019-12-06 11:45:17[DEBUG]django.db.backends.debug_sql(): (0.000) PRAGMA foreign_key_check; args=None
2019-12-06 11:45:17[DEBUG]django.db.backends.schema.execute(): CREATE INDEX "udjango_report_user_id_60bc619c" ON "udjango_report" ("user_id"); (params ())
2019-12-06 11:45:17[DEBUG]django.db.backends.debug_sql(): (0.000) CREATE INDEX "udjango_report_user_id_60bc619c" ON "udjango_report" ("user_id"); args=()
2019-12-06 11:45:17[DEBUG]django.db.backends.debug_sql(): (0.000) PRAGMA foreign_keys = ON; args=None
2019-12-06 11:45:17[DEBUG]django.db.backends.debug_sql(): (0.017) INSERT INTO "udjango_user" ("email") VALUES ('anne@example.com'); args=['anne@example.com']
2019-12-06 11:45:17[DEBUG]django.db.backends.debug_sql(): (0.023) INSERT INTO "udjango_user" ("email") VALUES ('adam@example.com'); args=['adam@example.com']
2019-12-06 11:45:17[DEBUG]django.db.backends.debug_sql(): (0.022) INSERT INTO "udjango_user" ("email") VALUES ('alice@example.com'); args=['alice@example.com']
2019-12-06 11:45:17[DEBUG]django.db.backends.debug_sql(): (0.022) INSERT INTO "udjango_user" ("email") VALUES ('bob@example.com'); args=['bob@example.com']
2019-12-06 11:45:17[DEBUG]django.db.backends.debug_sql(): (0.029) INSERT INTO "udjango_report" ("user_id") VALUES (1); args=[1]
2019-12-06 11:45:17[DEBUG]django.db.backends.debug_sql(): (0.033) INSERT INTO "udjango_report" ("user_id") VALUES (3); args=[3]
2019-12-06 11:45:17[DEBUG]django.db.backends.debug_sql(): (0.033) INSERT INTO "udjango_report" ("user_id") VALUES (3); args=[3]
2019-12-06 11:45:17[INFO]root.main(): users without reports
2019-12-06 11:45:17[DEBUG]django.db.backends.debug_sql(): (0.000) SELECT "udjango_user"."id", "udjango_user"."email" FROM "udjango_user" LEFT OUTER JOIN "udjango_report" ON ("udjango_user"."id" = "udjango_report"."user_id") WHERE ("udjango_user"."email" LIKE 'a%' ESCAPE '\' AND "udjango_report"."id" IS NULL) LIMIT 21; args=('a%',)
2019-12-06 11:45:17[INFO]root.main(): <QuerySet [User('adam@example.com')]>
2019-12-06 11:45:17[INFO]root.main(): users with reports (allows duplicates)
2019-12-06 11:45:17[DEBUG]django.db.backends.debug_sql(): (0.000) SELECT "udjango_user"."id", "udjango_user"."email" FROM "udjango_user" INNER JOIN "udjango_report" ON ("udjango_user"."id" = "udjango_report"."user_id") WHERE ("udjango_user"."email" LIKE 'a%' ESCAPE '\' AND "udjango_report"."id" IS NOT NULL) LIMIT 21; args=('a%',)
2019-12-06 11:45:17[INFO]root.main(): <QuerySet [User('anne@example.com'), User('alice@example.com'), User('alice@example.com')]>
2019-12-06 11:45:17[INFO]root.main(): users with reports (no duplicates)
2019-12-06 11:45:17[DEBUG]django.db.backends.debug_sql(): (0.000) SELECT "udjango_user"."id", "udjango_user"."email" FROM "udjango_user" WHERE (NOT ("udjango_user"."id" IN (SELECT U0."id" FROM "udjango_user" U0 LEFT OUTER JOIN "udjango_report" U1 ON (U0."id" = U1."user_id") WHERE U1."id" IS NULL)) AND "udjango_user"."email" LIKE 'a%' ESCAPE '\') LIMIT 21; args=('a%',)
2019-12-06 11:45:17[INFO]root.main(): <QuerySet [User('anne@example.com'), User('alice@example.com')]>
2019-12-06 11:45:17[INFO]root.main(): users with reports (no duplicates, simpler SQL)
2019-12-06 11:45:17[DEBUG]django.db.backends.debug_sql(): (0.000) SELECT "udjango_user"."id", "udjango_user"."email" FROM "udjango_user" WHERE ("udjango_user"."email" LIKE 'a%' ESCAPE '\' AND "udjango_user"."id" IN (SELECT U0."user_id" FROM "udjango_report" U0)) LIMIT 21; args=('a%',)
2019-12-06 11:45:17[INFO]root.main(): <QuerySet [User('anne@example.com'), User('alice@example.com')]>
2019-12-06 11:45:17[INFO]root.main(): users with reports (EXISTS clause, Django 3.0)
2019-12-06 11:45:17[DEBUG]django.db.backends.debug_sql(): (0.000) SELECT "udjango_user"."id", "udjango_user"."email" FROM "udjango_user" WHERE (EXISTS(SELECT U0."id", U0."user_id" FROM "udjango_report" U0 WHERE U0."user_id" = "udjango_user"."id") AND "udjango_user"."email" LIKE 'a%' ESCAPE '\') LIMIT 21; args=('a%',)
2019-12-06 11:45:17[INFO]root.main(): <QuerySet [User('anne@example.com'), User('alice@example.com')]>
2019-12-06 11:45:17[INFO]root.main(): Done.

You can see that the final query uses all inner joins.

  • It looks like your code snippet may not be complete. The last statement is Report.objects.create(user=anne) whereas your output and thoughts indicate that you intended to show more code. I am eager to see it! – Krystian Cybulski Jan 25 '17 at 9:03
  • Not sure what you're talking about, @KrystianCybulski. My browser shows about that much code, but then there's a scroll bar to see the rest. If you're having browser trouble, try editing the answer to see the Markdown source. – Don Kirkby Jan 25 '17 at 17:49
  • You are correct. I apologize. Chrome on Mac is clever and hides the scroll bar in the embedded code box. I did not realize it is scrollable. – Krystian Cybulski Jan 26 '17 at 19:59
  • 1
    And this, my friends, is true art —not the modern "I get (buy|understand) it and you don't" art, but the original, artful display of mastery in your craft, art. This is no one-trick fish, but a fishing rod with a self contained testing pond, for anyone to easily demonstrate how to throw some lines, or try a few quick bug catching baits. Well done Don. – Chema Oct 16 '17 at 20:07
2

To filter users who do not have reports associated with them try this:

users = User.objects.exclude(id__in=[elem.user.id for elem in Report.objects.all()])

  • This is promising. I need to see what sort of SQL this would generate. I think also that id__in = Report.objects.all() will suffice for the .exclude() call. – Krystian Cybulski Feb 12 '13 at 13:23
  • 2
    If you use only users=User.objects.exclude(id__in=Report.objects.all()) you will get all users which id is the same as any Report id – Lukasz Koziara Feb 12 '13 at 13:29
  • 4
    This is a bad answer, except when you're only going to use the website yourself, or within your closes friends ;) If you have 1 billion reports, this will probably crash the database. Rule of thumb: never use __in= in queries! Besides, you even dont have Report.objects.values('user_id').distinct(), which would help a bit with many reports but few users scenario. – Tomasz Gandor Apr 16 '14 at 7:17
  • 3
    I'd better improve on my "rule of thumb" - use something__in=[my_value1, my_value2, ...] only when you have a constant number of possibilities. This practically means that you are specifying it manually in some way. And OKAY - if you're passing a queryset object, this will actually turn into an SQL subquery, like: WHERE "auth_user"."id" in (SELECT U0."id" FROM "report" U0). So you can still hope that the database makes sense of it. – Tomasz Gandor Apr 16 '14 at 7:29
  • 1
    For someone reading this answer: [elem.user.id for elem in Report.objects.all()] is highly inefficient - it fetches all fields from reports (when only one is needed), builds all Report instances for no good reason, and finally does one extra sql query per report to retrieve the user... list(Report.objects.values_list('user_id', flat=True)) would solve all those issues (still not the best solution but...). – bruno desthuilliers Jan 10 '19 at 15:51

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