264

I need to find arrays where all values are equal. What's the fastest way to do this? Should I loop through it and just compare values?

['a', 'a', 'a', 'a'] // true
['a', 'a', 'b', 'a'] // false
12
  • 1
    @T.J.Crowder I bet you are already thinking about the best solution ;)
    – VisioN
    Feb 12 '13 at 12:31
  • 3
    @T.J.Crowder: Not to mention the willingness of askers to actually accept answers. Users with 1 rep often seem to be ask & run types that leave as soon as they have a copy-paste-able answer, lately.
    – Cerbrus
    Feb 12 '13 at 12:39
  • 1
    Something around this approach should work ? a.join(',').split(a[0]).length === a.length + 1
    – Jashwant
    Feb 12 '13 at 12:42
  • 2
    @TomášZato: "OP" means "original poster" (the person asking the question). Feb 12 '13 at 14:38
  • 2
    Possible duplicate of Check if each item in an array is identical in javascript Feb 14 '17 at 4:32

31 Answers 31

434
const allEqual = arr => arr.every( v => v === arr[0] )
allEqual( [1,1,1,1] )  // true

Or one-liner:

[1,1,1,1].every( (val, i, arr) => val === arr[0] )   // true

Array.prototype.every (from MDN) : The every() method tests whether all elements in the array pass the test implemented by the provided function.

9
  • 34
    Brevity is the soul of wit
    – svarog
    Jul 6 '16 at 7:36
  • 1
    I have created a jsperf case. This method outperforms most candidates. Jan 18 '18 at 4:44
  • 2
    const everythings_equal = array => array.every(thing => thing === array[0]); Jan 25 '18 at 11:24
  • 18
    Use some instead of every: arr.some( v => v !== arr[0] ). This will return early upon the first element found being unequal to arr[0].
    – Jan
    Jul 9 '19 at 5:03
  • 9
    @Jan every does early return as well.
    – golopot
    Jul 15 '19 at 17:24
111

Edit: Be a Red ninja:

!!array.reduce(function(a, b){ return (a === b) ? a : NaN; });

Results:

var array = ["a", "a", "a"] => result: "true"
var array = ["a", "b", "a"] => result: "false"
var array = ["false", ""] => result: "false"
var array = ["false", false] => result: "false"
var array = ["false", "false"] => result: "true"
var array = [NaN, NaN] => result: "false" 

Warning:

var array = [] => result: TypeError thrown

This is because we do not pass an initialValue. So, you may wish to check array.length first.

14
  • 5
    might be a bit late to the party... i think this doesn't work if your array is made of falses! for example try [false, false, false].reduce(function(a, b){return (a === b)?a:false;}); Nov 27 '14 at 19:21
  • 3
    @Martin: ["false", ""] returns true :/
    – dalgard
    Oct 15 '15 at 16:55
  • 6
    This can be taken up a notch by using NaN. Since both NaN === NaN and NaN !== NaN are false, it guarantees that once the prev is set to NaN then no value can take it out. Also adding in a double negation converts the results to true and false, since NaN is falsy. Final form: !!array.reduce(function(a, b){ return (a === b) ? a : NaN; }); Jan 19 '16 at 17:53
  • 5
    DOWNVOTED. What if the elements are equal but falsy? Jan 25 '18 at 9:52
  • 3
    I downvoted because this doesn't work with booleans values.
    – Tyguy7
    Apr 3 '18 at 22:10
63

This works. You create a method on Array by using prototype.

if (Array.prototype.allValuesSame === undefined) {
  Array.prototype.allValuesSame = function() {
    for (let i = 1; i < this.length; i++) {
      if (this[i] !== this[0]) {
        return false;
      }
    }
    return true;
  }
}

Call this in this way:

let a = ['a', 'a', 'a'];
let b = a.allValuesSame(); // true
a = ['a', 'b', 'a'];
b = a.allValuesSame();     // false
8
  • 5
    very nice, but beware: IE does not support this way of assigning prototypes. I use it anyway. Feb 12 '13 at 12:34
  • 6
    @TomášZato: IE supports augmenting the Array.prototype just fine (even IE6). It's only DOM element prototypes that some older versions of IE don't support augmenting. Feb 12 '13 at 13:00
  • 6
    I don't think it's a good idea to be monkey patching built-in prototypes. If multiple libraries do it, it can lead to unexpected behavior that's very difficult to debug. Dec 12 '14 at 7:33
  • 1
    @MarkWilbur +1 especially if you do a for..in loop on next arrays, you'll get allValuesSame in the loop Apr 23 '16 at 9:14
  • 1
    I went ahead and modernized this, without altering the intent. Jan 8 '20 at 19:36
48

You can turn the Array into a Set. If the size of the Set is equal to 1, then all elements of the Array are equal.

function allEqual(arr) {
  return new Set(arr).size == 1;
}

allEqual(['a', 'a', 'a', 'a']); // true
allEqual(['a', 'a', 'b', 'a']); // false
2
  • 2
    Brilliant. Just note that allEqual([NaN, NaN]) gives true in this case. Jan 25 '18 at 11:26
  • ^ because both NaN === NaN and NaN == NaN evaluate to false
    – ATOMP
    Aug 24 '20 at 22:50
32

In JavaScript 1.6, you can use Array.every:

function AllTheSame(array) {
    var first = array[0];
    return array.every(function(element) {
        return element === first;
    });
}

You probably need some sanity checks, e.g. when the array has no elements. (Also, this won't work when all elements are NaN since NaN !== NaN, but that shouldn't be an issue... right?)

0
15

And for performance comparison I also did a benchmark:

function allAreEqual(array){
    if(!array.length) return true;
    // I also made sure it works with [false, false] array
    return array.reduce(function(a, b){return (a === b)?a:(!b);}) === array[0];
}
function same(a) {
    if (!a.length) return true;
    return !a.filter(function (e) {
        return e !== a[0];
    }).length;
}

function allTheSame(array) {
    var first = array[0];
    return array.every(function(element) {
        return element === first;
    });
}

function useSome(array){
    return !array.some(function(value, index, array){
        return value !== array[0];
    });
}

Results:

allAreEqual x 47,565 ops/sec ±0.16% (100 runs sampled)
same x 42,529 ops/sec ±1.74% (92 runs sampled)
allTheSame x 66,437 ops/sec ±0.45% (102 runs sampled)
useSome x 70,102 ops/sec ±0.27% (100 runs sampled)

So apparently using builtin array.some() is the fastest method of the ones sampled.

3
  • 3
    Good idea to check what's more performant here. The reason why Array#some is going to sometimes outperform is that once the callback function returns true, it stops iterating. So, if all the elements are in fact equal, the performance should be identical to Array#every. And the relative performance when all elements are not equal will vary based on the index of the first non-matching element. Jan 6 '15 at 12:09
  • 3
    Nice one. You could have named each with the function used lol. E.g.: reduce, filter, every, some Aug 2 '17 at 15:54
  • 1
    where s the native for loop, I bet that outperforms all of these by a factor of 5
    – PirateApp
    May 11 '19 at 15:57
10

If you're already using underscore.js, then here's another option using _.uniq:

function allEqual(arr) {
    return _.uniq(arr).length === 1;
}

_.uniq returns a duplicate-free version of the array. If all the values are the same, then the length will be 1.

As mentioned in the comments, given that you may expect an empty array to return true, then you should also check for that case:

function allEqual(arr) {
    return arr.length === 0 || _.uniq(arr).length === 1;
}
2
  • But if array is empty, your answer will return false. While I think it should be true. Changing to .length <= 1 shall be enough though. Mar 22 '17 at 11:43
  • @Kasztan that's a fair point. I've updated my answer to cover that case.
    – Tom Fenech
    Mar 22 '17 at 13:29
10

Shortest answer using underscore/lodash

function elementsEqual(arr) {
    return !_.without(arr, arr[0]).length
}

spec:

elementsEqual(null) // throws error
elementsEqual([]) // true
elementsEqual({}) // true
elementsEqual([1]) // true
elementsEqual([1,2]) // false
elementsEqual(NaN) // true

edit:

Or even shorter, inspired by Tom's answer:

function elementsEqual2(arr) {
    return _.uniq(arr).length <= 1;
}

spec:

elementsEqual2(null) // true (beware, it's different than above)
elementsEqual2([]) // true
elementsEqual2({}) // true
elementsEqual2([1]) // true
elementsEqual2([1,2]) // false
elementsEqual2(NaN) // true
6

Yes, you can check it also using filter as below, very simple, checking every values are the same as the first one:

//ES6
function sameValues(arr) {
  return arr.filter((v,i,a)=>v===a[0]).length === arr.length;
} 

also can be done using every method on the array:

//ES6
function sameValues(arr) {
  return arr.every((v,i,a)=>v===a[0]);
} 

and you can check your arrays like below:

sameValues(['a', 'a', 'a', 'a']); // true
sameValues(['a', 'a', 'b', 'a']); // false

Or you can add it to native Array functionalities in JavaScript if you reuse it a lot:

//ES6
Array.prototype.sameValues = Array.prototype.sameValues || function(){
 this.every((v,i,a)=>v===a[0]);
}

and you can check your arrays like below:

['a', 'a', 'a', 'a'].sameValues(); // true
['a', 'a', 'b', 'a'].sameValues(); // false
5

You can use Array.every if supported:

var equals = array.every(function(value, index, array){
    return value === array[0];
});

Alternatives approach of a loop could be something like sort

var temp = array.slice(0).sort();
var equals = temp[0] === temp[temp.length - 1];

Or, if the items are like the question, something dirty like:

var equals = array.join('').split(array[0]).join('').length === 0;

Also works.

2
  • You have the first example backwards. Should be equals = !array.some( (v,i,a) => v!==a[0] ). Otherwise you're just checking that any value equals the first which will, of course, always be true :)
    – Nobody
    Jul 30 '15 at 4:53
  • Not exactly, I used some instead of every as I mentioned in the first paragraph. :) Thanks for the catch!
    – ZER0
    Aug 2 '15 at 15:39
5

You can get this one-liner to do what you want using Array.prototype.every, Object.is, and ES6 arrow functions:

const all = arr => arr.every(x => Object.is(arr[0], x));
1
  • 2
    Please, describe the solution you're proposing.
    – il_raffa
    Dec 29 '15 at 10:26
5

every() function check if all elements of an array

    const checkArr = a => a.every( val => val === a[0] )
    checkArr(['a','a','a'])  // true 
     
4

I think the simplest way to do this is to create a loop to compare the each value to the next. As long as there is a break in the "chain" then it would return false. If the first is equal to the second, the second equal to the third and so on, then we can conclude that all elements of the array are equal to each other.

given an array data[], then you can use:

for(x=0;x<data.length - 1;x++){
    if (data[x] != data[x+1]){
        isEqual = false;            
    }
}
alert("All elements are equal is " + isEqual);
0
3
arr.length && arr.reduce(function(a, b){return (a === b)?a:false;}) === arr[0];
3

Update new solution: check index

 let a = ['a', 'a', 'b', 'a'];
 let a = ['a', 'a', 'a', 'a'];
 let check = (list) => list.every(item => list.indexOf(item) === 0);
 check(a); // false;
 check(b); // true;

Updated with ES6: Use list.every is the fastest way:

 let a = ['a', 'a', 'b', 'a'];
 let check = (list) => list.every(item => item === list[0]);

old version:

      var listTrue = ['a', 'a', 'a', 'a'];
      var listFalse = ['a', 'a', 'a', 'ab'];

      function areWeTheSame(list) { 
         var sample = list[0];
         return (list.every((item) => item === sample));
      }
2

You can use this:

function same(a) {
    if (!a.length) return true;
    return !a.filter(function (e) {
        return e !== a[0];
    }).length;
}

The function first checks whether the array is empty. If it is it's values are equals.. Otherwise it filter the array and takes all elements which are different from the first one. If there are no such values => the array contains only equal elements otherwise it doesn't.

0
2

Its Simple. Create a function and pass a parameter. In that function copy the first index into a new variable. Then Create a for loop and loop through the array. Inside a loop create an while loop with a condition checking whether the new created variable is equal to all the elements in the loop. if its equal return true after the for loop completes else return false inside the while loop.

function isUniform(arra){
    var k=arra[0];
    for (var i = 0; i < arra.length; i++) {
        while(k!==arra[i]){
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}
2

The accepted answer worked great but I wanted to add a tiny bit. It didn't work for me to use === because I was comparing arrays of arrays of objects, however throughout my app I've been using the fast-deep-equal package which I highly recommend. With that, my code looks like this:

let areAllEqual = arrs.every((val, i, arr) => equal(val, arr[0]) );

and my data looks like this:

[  
  [
    {
      "ID": 28,
      "AuthorID": 121,
      "VisitTypeID": 2
    },
    {
      "ID": 115,
      "AuthorID": 121,
      "VisitTypeID": 1
    },
    {
      "ID": 121,
      "AuthorID": 121,
      "VisitTypeID": 1
    }
  ],
  [
    {
      "ID": 121,
      "AuthorID": 121,
      "VisitTypeID": 1
    }
  ],
  [
    {
      "ID": 5,
      "AuthorID": 121,
      "VisitTypeID": 1
    },
    {
      "ID": 121,
      "AuthorID": 121,
      "VisitTypeID": 1
    }
  ]
]
2

Now you can make use of sets to do that easily.

let a= ['a', 'a', 'a', 'a']; // true
let b =['a', 'a', 'b', 'a'];// false

console.log(new Set(a).size === 1);
console.log(new Set(b).size === 1);

2

You could use a for loop:

function isEqual(arr) {
  var first = arr[0];
  for (let i = 1; i < arr.length; i++) {
    if (first !== arr[i]) {
      return false;
    }
  }
  return true;
}
1

Underscore's _.isEqual(object, other) function seems to work well for arrays. The order of items in the array matter when it checks for equality. See http://underscorejs.org/#isEqual.

1
var listTrue = ['a', 'a', 'a', 'a'];
var listFalse = ['a', 'a', 'a', 'ab'];

function areWeTheSame(list) { 
    var sample = list[0];
    return !(list.some(function(item) {
        return !(item == sample);
    }));
}
1
  • Please also explain what you did instead of just pasting some code.
    – Wouter J
    May 4 '15 at 11:16
1
function isUniform(array) {   
  for (var i=1; i< array.length; i++) {
    if (array[i] !== array[0]) { return false; }
  }

  for (var i=1; i< array.length; i++) {
    if (array[i] === array[0]) { return true; }
  }
}
  • For the first loop; whenever it detects uneven, returns "false"
  • The first loop runs, and if it returns false, we have "false"
  • When it's not return false, it means there will be true, so we do the second loop. And of course we will have "true" from the second loop (because the first loop found it's NOT false)
1

You can convert array to a Set and check its size

In case of primitive array entries, i.e. number, string:

const isArrayWithEqualEntries = array => new Set(array).size === 1

In case of array of objects with some field to be tested for equivalence, say id:

const mapper = ({id}) => id
const isArrayWithEqualEntries = array => new Set(array.map(mapper)).size === 1
0

Another interesting way when you use ES6 arrow function syntax:

x = ['a', 'a', 'a', 'a']
!x.filter(e=>e!==x[0])[0]  // true

x = ['a', 'a', 'b', 'a']
!x.filter(e=>e!==x[0])[0] // false

x = []
!x.filter(e=>e!==x[0])[0]  // true

And when you don't want to reuse the variable for array (x):

!['a', 'a', 'a', 'a'].filter((e,i,a)=>e!==a[0])[0]    // true

IMO previous poster who used array.every(...) has the cleanest solution.

0

this might work , you can use the comment out code as well that also woks well with the given scenerio.

function isUniform(){
	var arrayToMatch = [1,1,1,1,1];
	var temp = arrayToMatch[0];
	console.log(temp);
  /* return arrayToMatch.every(function(check){
    return check == temp;
   });*/
var bool;
   arrayToMatch.forEach(function(check){
    bool=(check == temp);
   })
  console.log(bool);
}
isUniform();

0
  1. Create a string by joining the array.
  2. Create string by repetition of the first character of the given array
  3. match both strings

	function checkArray(array){
		return array.join("") == array[0].repeat(array.length);	
	}

	console.log('array: [a,a,a,a]: ' + checkArray(['a', 'a', 'a', 'a']));
	console.log('array: [a,a,b,a]: ' + checkArray(['a', 'a', 'b', 'a']));

And you are DONE !

-1

Simple one line solution, just compare it to an array filled with the first entry.

if(arr.join('') === Array(arr.length).fill(arr[0]).join(''))
2
  • That doesn't seem like a solution that can be used anywhere
    – Lu4
    Sep 22 '16 at 10:05
  • It's pretty close to ok. Better would be something like: function arrayOfSame(arr) { return (arr.join('') == (new Array(arr.length+1).join(arr[0]))); }
    – Arkain
    Mar 15 '17 at 15:57
-1
**// Logical Solution:- Declare global array and one variable(To check the condition) whether all element of an array contains same value or not.**

    var arr =[];
    var isMatching = false;

    for(var i=0;i<arr.length;i++){
            if(String(arr[i]).toLowerCase()== "Your string to check"){
                isMatching=true;
                // Array has same value in all index of an array
            }
            else{
                isMatching=false;
                // Array Doesn't has same value in all index of an array
                break;
            }
        }
    // **Check isMatching variable is true or false**

        if(isMatching){ // True
            //If Array has same value in all index, then this block will get executed
        }
        else{ //False
            //If Array doesn't has same value in all index, then this block will get executed
        }
-1

You could count the number of distinct values in the array, if this value is 1 all the entries are the same.

Example:

array = np.array([1, 2, 2, 3, 3])
set(array) # this gives the different values present in the array (1,2,3)
len(set(array)) # this returns 3, 3 different values in the array

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