1445

How do I print the error/exception in the except: block?

try:
    ...
except:
    print(exception)
2

11 Answers 11

1956

For Python 2.6 and later and Python 3.x:

except Exception as e: print(e)

For Python 2.5 and earlier, use:

except Exception,e: print str(e)
8
  • 121
    str( KeyError('bad')) => 'bad' -- doesn't tell exception type
    – Dave
    Commented Aug 28, 2015 at 16:47
  • 49
    print(e) on keyerrors seems to give only the key, but not the full exception message, which is less than helpful.
    – Veggiet
    Commented Feb 10, 2019 at 13:03
  • 101
    If you are going to print the exception, it is better to use print(repr(e)); the base Exception.__str__ implementation only returns the exception message, not the type. Or, use the traceback module, which has methods for printing the current exception, formatted, or the full traceback.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Commented Oct 7, 2019 at 9:55
  • 4
    @MartijnPieters the print(repr(e)) doesn't give any stracktrace. The print_exc from traceback module (mentioned in the other answer) though works in this case.
    – Hi-Angel
    Commented Dec 18, 2020 at 11:10
  • 9
    @Hi-Angel: Where am I claiming that printing repr(e) would give the stack trace? I'm talking about the difference between str(e) and repr(e), the latter includes more information that you would also see in the last line(s) of a traceback. I explicitly mention the traceback module in my comment.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Commented Dec 24, 2020 at 16:36
804

The traceback module provides methods for formatting and printing exceptions and their tracebacks, e.g. this would print exception like the default handler does:

import traceback

try:
    1/0
except Exception:
    traceback.print_exc()

Output:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "C:\scripts\divide_by_zero.py", line 4, in <module>
    1/0
ZeroDivisionError: division by zero
8
  • 9
    is there some kind of get_error_message call that I can print with seeing as I'm using my own printing routine to add some other things.
    – MikeSchem
    Commented Mar 27, 2018 at 23:06
  • 66
    @MikeSchem error_message = traceback.format_exc()
    – heyzling
    Commented Feb 8, 2019 at 19:31
  • 3
    This snipped does not use the captured exception object. Can you expand the code to use 'ex'? - as in except Exception as ex:... Commented Aug 19, 2019 at 19:42
  • 7
    @aaronsteers it does use the captured exception; in an exception handler the current exception is available via the sys.exc_info() function and the traceback.print_exc() function gets it from there. You’d only ever need to pass in an exception explicitly when not handling an exception or when you want to show info based on a different exception.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Commented Oct 7, 2019 at 9:57
  • 6
    Yes, I would sometimes like to hold onto the exception and print it later, when I'm no longer in the 'except' block. Commented Oct 9, 2019 at 16:55
202

In Python 2.6 or greater it's a bit cleaner:

except Exception as e: print(e)

In older versions it's still quite readable:

except Exception, e: print e
1
  • This solution was exactly said above! (see previous ones then write) Commented Jan 24 at 5:53
134

Python 3: logging

Instead of using the basic print() function, the more flexible logging module can be used to log the exception. The logging module offers a lot extra functionality, for example, logging messages...

  • into a given log file, or
  • with timestamps and additional information about where the logging happened.

For more information check out the official documentation.


Usage

Logging an exception can be done with the module-level function logging.exception() like so:

import logging

try:
    1/0
except BaseException:
    logging.exception("An exception was thrown!")

Output

ERROR:root:An exception was thrown!
Traceback (most recent call last):
File ".../Desktop/test.py", line 4, in <module>
    1/0
ZeroDivisionError: division by zero 

Notes

  • the function logging.exception() should only be called from an exception handler

  • the logging module should not be used inside a logging handler to avoid a RecursionError (thanks @PrakharPandey)


Alternative log-levels

It's also possible to log the exception with another log level but still show the exception details by using the keyword argument exc_info=True, like so:

logging.critical("An exception was thrown!", exc_info=True)
logging.error   ("An exception was thrown!", exc_info=True)
logging.warning ("An exception was thrown!", exc_info=True)
logging.info    ("An exception was thrown!", exc_info=True)
logging.debug   ("An exception was thrown!", exc_info=True)

# or the general form
logging.log(level, "An exception was thrown!", exc_info=True)

Name and description only

Of course, if you don't want the whole traceback but only some specific information (e.g., exception name and description), you can still use the logging module like so:

try:
    1/0
except BaseException as exception:
    logging.warning(f"Exception Name: {type(exception).__name__}")
    logging.warning(f"Exception Desc: {exception}")

Output

WARNING:root:Exception Name: ZeroDivisionError
WARNING:root:Exception Desc: division by zero
4
  • 7
    Should not be used inside a logging handler to avoid RecursionError Commented Jan 24, 2020 at 12:32
  • 1
    In this example, the exception is logged and the exception is "handled". One may wish to re-raise this exception, if not sufficiently handled.
    – sqqqrly
    Commented Apr 3, 2023 at 14:01
  • This "logging.exception()" is great! It has alwas worked well for me. When I, instead, logged "Exception" or anything in the other answers, sometimes it worked well, sometimes it printed another "error", sometimes it did not tell the filename and line number of the error, and sometimes it logged a wrong file and line number.
    – Convexity
    Commented Aug 23, 2023 at 7:06
  • Excepting BaseException may be risky. See note for KeyboardInterrupt at the official documentation: docs.python.org/3/library/exceptions.html#KeyboardInterrupt
    – Kuchara
    Commented Mar 12 at 11:55
82

Expanding off of the "except Exception as e:" solution here is a nice one liner which includes some additional info like the type of error and where it occurred.

try:
    1/0
except Exception as e:
    print(f"{type(e).__name__} at line {e.__traceback__.tb_lineno} of {__file__}: {e}")

Output:

ZeroDivisionError at line 48 of /Users/.../script.py: division by zero
7
  • 5
    The most useful answer. Commented Jul 28, 2022 at 18:57
  • 1
    for me pint(e) only returns Message: nothing else in python 3.7 anaconda
    – doplano
    Commented Jan 12, 2023 at 10:07
  • had to scroll down too far to get the real answer.
    – izzulmakin
    Commented Jul 8, 2023 at 23:16
  • It is maybe useful for the sake of example to know where to grab the information of the exception, but it is really clumsy if you think to handle all exceptions this way.
    – JayZee
    Commented Dec 20, 2023 at 6:04
  • @JayZee, not clumsy if you write a function consisting of the print line in the answer and just pass the exception to that function from every exception block.
    – hBrent
    Commented Feb 23 at 22:21
80

(I was going to leave this as a comment on @jldupont's answer, but I don't have enough reputation.)

I've seen answers like @jldupont's answer in other places as well. FWIW, I think it's important to note that this:

except Exception as e:
    print(e)

will print the error output to sys.stdout by default. A more appropriate approach to error handling in general would be:

except Exception as e:
    print(e, file=sys.stderr)

(Note that you have to import sys for this to work.) This way, the error is printed to STDERR instead of STDOUT, which allows for the proper output parsing/redirection/etc. I understand that the question was strictly about 'printing an error', but it seems important to point out the best practice here rather than leave out this detail that could lead to non-standard code for anyone who doesn't eventually learn better.

I haven't used the traceback module as in Cat Plus Plus's answer, and maybe that's the best way, but I thought I'd throw this out there.

2
  • 4
    I would suggest further adding flush=True. I've noticed with systemd (and not using a proper logging framework), that buffering when capturing to the journal is not what I would have expected. Commented Feb 11, 2019 at 0:42
  • @CameronKerr isn’t ‘stderr’ not buffered?
    – avighnac
    Commented Mar 21, 2023 at 7:19
72

In case you want to pass error strings, here is an example from Errors and Exceptions (Python 2.6)

>>> try:
...    raise Exception('spam', 'eggs')
... except Exception as inst:
...    print type(inst)     # the exception instance
...    print inst.args      # arguments stored in .args
...    print inst           # __str__ allows args to printed directly
...    x, y = inst          # __getitem__ allows args to be unpacked directly
...    print 'x =', x
...    print 'y =', y
...
<type 'exceptions.Exception'>
('spam', 'eggs')
('spam', 'eggs')
x = spam
y = eggs
0
69

One has pretty much control on which information from the traceback to be displayed/logged when catching exceptions.

The code

with open("not_existing_file.txt", 'r') as text:
    pass

would produce the following traceback:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "exception_checks.py", line 19, in <module>
    with open("not_existing_file.txt", 'r') as text:
FileNotFoundError: [Errno 2] No such file or directory: 'not_existing_file.txt'

Print/Log the full traceback

As others already mentioned, you can catch the whole traceback by using the traceback module:

import traceback
try:
    with open("not_existing_file.txt", 'r') as text:
        pass
except Exception as exception:
    traceback.print_exc()

This will produce the following output:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "exception_checks.py", line 19, in <module>
    with open("not_existing_file.txt", 'r') as text:
FileNotFoundError: [Errno 2] No such file or directory: 'not_existing_file.txt'

You can achieve the same by using logging:

try:
    with open("not_existing_file.txt", 'r') as text:
        pass
except Exception as exception:
    logger.error(exception, exc_info=True)

Output:

__main__: 2020-05-27 12:10:47-ERROR- [Errno 2] No such file or directory: 'not_existing_file.txt'
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "exception_checks.py", line 27, in <module>
    with open("not_existing_file.txt", 'r') as text:
FileNotFoundError: [Errno 2] No such file or directory: 'not_existing_file.txt'

Print/log error name/message only

You might not be interested in the whole traceback, but only in the most important information, such as Exception name and Exception message, use:

try:
    with open("not_existing_file.txt", 'r') as text:
        pass
except Exception as exception:
    print("Exception: {}".format(type(exception).__name__))
    print("Exception message: {}".format(exception))

Output:

Exception: FileNotFoundError
Exception message: [Errno 2] No such file or directory: 'not_existing_file.txt'
3
  • 8
    Wish I could upvote this answer many times, as it's significantly more helpful than the accepted one.
    – LarsH
    Commented Aug 10, 2020 at 16:01
  • With the last section in your answer ('Print/log error name\message only') how can I print both Exception and Exception Message using print only once? Whenever I try to do it, it turns out all weird. Commented Sep 9, 2020 at 6:58
  • 1
    print(f"Exception: {type(exception).__name__}\nException message: {exception}"). The f at the beginning signifies that it is an f-string, which just allows you to put the expression in the curly braces instead of using .format(). f-strings only work on systems running Python 3.6+ however Commented Oct 22, 2021 at 12:49
39

Try this

try:
    print("Hare Krishna!")
except Exception as er:
    print(er)
1
  • 12
    Usually a code block with no explanation is not a very good answer. It helps the community much more if you could tell us why we should try this code and why it would/might help the op. Thanks! Commented Feb 24, 2022 at 2:27
4

One liner error raising can be done with assert statements if that's what you want to do. This will help you write statically fixable code and check errors early.

assert type(A) is type(""), "requires a string"
1
  • assert statements should not be used for normal logic; they are ignored if python runs with -O. See python(1). Commented Jun 29, 2022 at 9:55
4

I would recommend using a try-except statement. Also, rather than using a print statement, a logging exception logs a message with level ERROR on the logger, which I find is more effective than a print output. This method should only be called from an exception handler, as it is here:

import logging

try:
    *code goes here*
except BaseException:
    logging.exception("*Error goes here*")

There's good documentation on this python page if you want to learn more about logging and debugging.

1
  • Its difficult to judge in the repl, am I correct in thinking that this prints the exception but does not halt the program? I.e. I can still gracefully exit. Commented Oct 20, 2022 at 14:48

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.