43

I want to use something similar to the Knockout foreach construct to iterate over the properties of an object. Here is what I am trying to create...

DESIRED RESULT

<table>
    <tr>
        <td>Name 1</td>
        <td>8/5/2012</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>Name 2</td>
        <td>2/8/2013</td>
    </tr>
</table>

However, my model looks like this...

JS

function DataModel(){
    this.data = ko.observableArray([{
                        entityId: 1,
                        props: {
                            name: 'Name 1',
                            lastLogin: '8/5/2012'
                        }
                    },
                    {
                        entityId: 2,
                        props: {
                            name: 'Name 2',
                            lastLogin: '2/8/2013'
                        }
                    }]);
}

var dataModel = new DataModel();
ko.applyBindings(dataModel);

Each row has an entityId and props which is an object itself. This template doesn't work, but how would I change it to generate the desired table above?

EDIT: The props in this example are name and lastLogin, but I need a solution that is agnostic to what is contained inside props.

I have this FIDDLE going as well.

HTML

<div data-bind="template: { name: 'template', data: $data }"></div>

<script type="text/html" id="template">
    <table>
        <tr data-bind="foreach: data()">
            <td data-bind="text: entityId"></td>  
        </tr>
    </table> 
</script>
  • Is the quantity of props always 2 or they can differ between each others? – Loïc Faure-Lacroix Feb 14 '13 at 11:20
46

You could always create a binding handler to handle the transformation.

ko.bindingHandlers.foreachprop = {
  transformObject: function (obj) {
    var properties = [];
    ko.utils.objectForEach(obj, function (key, value) {
      properties.push({ key: key, value: value });
    });
    return properties;
  },
  init: function(element, valueAccessor, allBindingsAccessor, viewModel, bindingContext) {
    var properties = ko.pureComputed(function () {
      var obj = ko.utils.unwrapObservable(valueAccessor());
      return ko.bindingHandlers.foreachprop.transformObject(obj);
    });
    ko.applyBindingsToNode(element, { foreach: properties }, bindingContext);
    return { controlsDescendantBindings: true };
  }
};

Then apply it:

<div data-bind="template: { name: 'template', data: $data }"></div>

<script type="text/html" id="template">
    <table>
        <tbody data-bind="foreach: data">
            <tr data-bind="foreachprop: props">
                <td data-bind="text: value"></td>
            </tr>
        </tbody>
    </table> 
</script>
  • Value comes back as an object, why can't it just be a string like key? – Devil's Advocate May 21 '13 at 15:25
  • Just wondering whether it is possible with this foreachprop bind to use $parent. binding context? – Thewads Jan 9 '14 at 8:56
  • @Thewads: of course. You can use it with any plain object that has properties. Though I'm not sure I understand what you're referring to. – Jeff Mercado Jan 23 '14 at 2:10
  • 1
    One more thing to add. In order to access the context from within the template the bindingContext has to be sent as an parameter: ko.applyBindingsToNode(element, { foreach: properties }, bindingContext); – Razvan Mar 18 '14 at 12:46
  • 1
    @Brandon: The name can be accessed through the property key. – Jeff Mercado Jul 7 '15 at 15:33
62

In a modern browser (or with an appropriate polyfill) you can iterate over Object.keys(obj) (the method returns only own enumerable properties, meaning that there is no need for an additional hasOwnProperty check):

<table>
  <tbody data-bind="foreach: {data: data, as: '_data'}">
    <tr data-bind="foreach: {data: Object.keys(props), as: '_propkey'}">
      <th data-bind="text: _propkey"></th>
      <td data-bind="text: _data.props[_propkey]"></td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

Fiddled.

NB: I was simply curious to see if this would work, the template body above is more polluted than what I'd like to use in production (or come back to a few months later and be like "wtf").

Custom binding would be a better option, my personal preference though would be to use a computed observable or a writeable computed observable (the latter would be handy when working with json responses a-la restful api).

  • This answer is banging. Just ran into this and thought I would check what SO had to say. Custom Bindings for a specific purpose are not as valid for production large scale sites as a simple inline solutions such as this. – MattSizzle Nov 23 '14 at 4:57
  • I wish that I could upvote this multiple times. I like this for the reason that I don't have to create a bindinghandler. – valdetero Jan 2 '15 at 19:41
  • That's the best solution! I don't understand why it's not the first one. – jbartolome Jan 29 '15 at 21:49
  • Slightly different approach where a template is not needed - leveraging the $parent object: jsfiddle.net/skrile/87aywb93 – skrile Sep 29 '15 at 12:29
21

This is a modification of Jeff's answer, with the binding context preserved

ko.bindingHandlers.eachProp = {
    transformObject: function (obj) {
        var properties = [];
        for (var key in obj) {
            if (obj.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
                properties.push({ key: key, value: obj[key] });
            }
        }
        return ko.observableArray(properties);
    },
    init: function(element, valueAccessor, allBindingsAccessor, viewModel, bindingContext) {
        var value = ko.utils.unwrapObservable(valueAccessor()),
            properties = ko.bindingHandlers.eachProp.transformObject(value);

        ko.bindingHandlers['foreach'].init(element, properties, allBindingsAccessor, viewModel, bindingContext)
        return { controlsDescendantBindings: true };
    },
    update: function(element, valueAccessor, allBindingsAccessor, viewModel, bindingContext) {
        var value = ko.utils.unwrapObservable(valueAccessor()),
            properties = ko.bindingHandlers.eachProp.transformObject(value);

        ko.bindingHandlers['foreach'].update(element, properties, allBindingsAccessor, viewModel, bindingContext)
        return { controlsDescendantBindings: true };
    }
};

Now apply with parent and root:

<table>
    <tbody data-bind="foreach: data">
        <tr data-bind="eachProp: props">
            <td data-bind="text: value, click: $root.doSomething"></td>
        </tr>
    </tbody>
</table> 
  • 2
    This answer is better than accepted IMO as it includes the update function.. meaning it will behave like an observable not just a one time iteration. – Steve Cadwallader Sep 4 '14 at 17:31
  • @SteveCadwallader: it doesn't make it better that there's an explicit update function, it's calling the update function on the foreach handler directly. In other words, it's manually propagating the update calls. The other answer applied the foreach handler to the element so everything that foreach does will happen (including updates). The explicit update function is just not needed. – Jeff Mercado Apr 21 '17 at 0:59
3
<table>
    <tr data-bind="foreach: {data: data, as: 'item'}">
        <td data-bind="foreach: { data: Object.keys(item), as: 'key' }">
            <b data-bind="text: item[key]"></b>
        </td>  
    </tr>
</table>

function DataModel(){
this.data = ko.observableArray([{
                    entityId: 1,
                    props: {
                        name: 'Name 1',
                        lastLogin: '8/5/2012'
                    }
                },
                {
                    entityId: 2,
                    props: {
                        name: 'Name 2',
                        lastLogin: '2/8/2013'
                    }
                }]);
}

var dataModel = new DataModel();
ko.applyBindings(dataModel);

Hope that's helpful (pardon the brevity)

appendix:

Here's a working example which has been testing...

<table class="table table-hover">
    <thead>
        <tr>
            <!-- ko foreach: gridOptions.columnDefs -->
            <th data-bind="text: displayName"></th>
            <!-- /ko -->
        </tr>
    </thead>
    <tbody>
        <!-- ko foreach: {data: gridOptions.data, as: 'item'} -->
        <tr>
            <!-- ko foreach: {data: Object.keys(item), as: 'key'} -->
            <td>
                <span data-bind="text: item[key]"></span>
            </td>
            <!-- /ko -->
        </tr>
        <!-- /ko -->
    </tbody>
</table>
3

Simplified answer to work with any basic object, worked for me:

<!-- ko foreach: {data: Object.keys(myObj)} -->
    <span data-bind="text: $data"></span> 
    <span data-bind="text: $parent.myObj[$data]"></span>
<!-- /ko -->
  • Super clean and easy. Loving it, thank you! – Randy Hall Sep 16 '18 at 14:35
2

Supposedly, there is a deeper problem (see this thread at Google groups) that is that foreach treats the object as a dictionary of parameters, not as the collection to iterate.

My best solution so far is to combined foreach in Object.keys(myobject) and 'with' binding context.

2

I am a bit late, But I think this should work, a simple solution without using any template.

var json = [
	{
		"PortfolioCompanyId":240,
		"dt":"2018-12-31 00:00:00.0",
		"ValuationDate":"2017-09-30 00:00:00.0",
		"capitalexpenditure":-5555660.0,
		"workingcapitalchange":-812350.0
	},
	{
		"PortfolioCompanyId":240,
		"dt":"2019-12-31 00:00:00.0",
		"ValuationDate":"2017-09-30 00:00:00.0",
		"capitalexpenditure":-5613520.0,
		"workingcapitalchange":-893530.0
	},
	{
		"PortfolioCompanyId":240,
		"dt":"2020-12-31 00:00:00.0",
		"ValuationDate":"2017-09-30 00:00:00.0",
		"capitalexpenditure":-5674130.0,
		"workingcapitalchange":-982850.0
	},
	{
		"PortfolioCompanyId":240,
		"dt":"2021-12-31 00:00:00.0",
		"ValuationDate":"2017-09-30 00:00:00.0",
		"capitalexpenditure":-6241543.0,
		"workingcapitalchange":-1081135.0
	},
	{
		"PortfolioCompanyId":240,
		"dt":"2022-12-31 00:00:00.0",
		"ValuationDate":"2017-09-30 00:00:00.0",
		"capitalexpenditure":-6865697.3,
		"workingcapitalchange":-1189248.5
	}
];

var DataModel = function () {
            this.jsonArray = ko.observable(json);
        };
ko.applyBindings(new DataModel());
<link href="https://maxcdn.bootstrapcdn.com/bootstrap/3.3.7/css/bootstrap.min.css" rel="stylesheet"/>
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/knockout/3.4.2/knockout-min.js"></script>
<table class="table" data-bind="foreach:jsonArray">
       <tr data-bind="foreach:Object.keys($data)"> <!-- JSON Object -->
         <td data-bind="text : $parent[$data]"></td>
       </tr>
    </table>
    
    

  • This is the only straightforward answer to the original question and works perfectly. – Andresa Krul Oct 20 at 19:04
0

(not strictly iterating over the properties, but does create the table above)

<div data-bind="template: { name: 'template', data: $data }"></div>

<script type="text/html" id="template">
    <table data-bind="foreach: data()">
        <tr>
            <td data-bind="text: props.name"></td>  
            <td data-bind="text: props.lastLogin"></td>  
        </tr>
    </table>
</script>

updated: http://jsfiddle.net/cwnEE/7/

  • 2
    True, but I need it to iterate over the properties as the names in 'props' will be different for different tables. I edited the question to clarify this. – John Livermore Feb 12 '13 at 17:31

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.