53

Okay, I am looking for a function or something that will read the color of a certain pixel on my monitor, and when that color is detected, another function will be enabled. I figure using RGB. All help appreciated. Thank You.

5
  • 1
    Do you want to monitor the entire desktop or a specific application for this pixel change?
    – Eric J.
    Sep 27, 2009 at 16:53
  • a certain pixel. Like say the pixel at 125, 130 I need it to wait until it detects the RGB of that pixel go to a certain RGB.
    – Brandon
    Sep 27, 2009 at 16:59
  • 4
    Why do you need to do this? It seems like there is some sort of underlying reason that if you give us just a bit more information we might be able to give you a better way to achieve the same thing. Are you writing a game and need to determine when two objects collide? Are you trying to figure out if a certain program has started?
    – Lee
    Sep 27, 2009 at 17:08
  • It is for a game, it is two check if it is at a certain screen, and when it is, it starts a function.
    – Brandon
    Sep 27, 2009 at 17:16
  • 3
    But you should know what screen the game's at as you're in control of the code...
    – ChrisF
    Sep 27, 2009 at 17:46

6 Answers 6

55

This is the most efficient: It grabs a pixel at the location of the cursor, and doesn't rely on only having one monitor.

using System;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Drawing.Imaging;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace FormTest
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        [DllImport("user32.dll")]
        static extern bool GetCursorPos(ref Point lpPoint);

        [DllImport("gdi32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto, SetLastError = true, ExactSpelling = true)]
        public static extern int BitBlt(IntPtr hDC, int x, int y, int nWidth, int nHeight, IntPtr hSrcDC, int xSrc, int ySrc, int dwRop);

        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private void MouseMoveTimer_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            Point cursor = new Point();
            GetCursorPos(ref cursor);

            var c = GetColorAt(cursor);
            this.BackColor = c;

            if (c.R == c.G && c.G < 64 && c.B > 128)
            {
                MessageBox.Show("Blue");
            }
        }

        Bitmap screenPixel = new Bitmap(1, 1, PixelFormat.Format32bppArgb);
        public Color GetColorAt(Point location)
        {
            using (Graphics gdest = Graphics.FromImage(screenPixel))
            {
                using (Graphics gsrc = Graphics.FromHwnd(IntPtr.Zero))
                {
                    IntPtr hSrcDC = gsrc.GetHdc();
                    IntPtr hDC = gdest.GetHdc();
                    int retval = BitBlt(hDC, 0, 0, 1, 1, hSrcDC, location.X, location.Y, (int)CopyPixelOperation.SourceCopy);
                    gdest.ReleaseHdc();
                    gsrc.ReleaseHdc();
                }
            }

            return screenPixel.GetPixel(0, 0);
        }
    }
}

Now, obviously, you don't have to use the cursor's current location, but this is the general idea.

EDIT:

Given the above GetColorAt function you can poll a certain pixel on the screen in a safe, performance friendly way like this:

private void PollPixel(Point location, Color color)
{
    while(true)
    {
        var c = GetColorAt(location);

        if (c.R == color.R && c.G == color.G && c.B == color.B)
        {
            DoAction();
            return;
        }

        // By calling Thread.Sleep() without a parameter, we are signaling to the
        // operating system that we only want to sleep long enough for other
        // applications.  As soon as the other apps yield their CPU time, we will
        // regain control.
        Thread.Sleep()
    }
}

You can wrap that in a Thread if you want, or execute it from a Console application. "Whatever suits your fancy," I guess.

4
  • +1 for pointing out that CopyFromScreen can be used to just capture a small area of the screen.
    – tster
    Sep 27, 2009 at 17:21
  • 2
    But note that CopyFormScreen will leak one handle each time you call it. Sep 27, 2009 at 17:36
  • Thank you John, this works wonderfully, another quick question. If I want this to continuously search for pixels, how would i achieve this?
    – Brandon
    Sep 28, 2009 at 4:31
  • I know this is 10 years late, but in case anyone is interested in the answer to @Brandon's question: I used a timer, set an interval for every 250ms (or however fast you want it to search), and then on the timer_tick do the actual read. link Mar 22, 2019 at 15:44
22

Most answers here use the very same source of that pixel (desktop dc).
The key function is GetPixel.

[DllImport("user32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
public static extern IntPtr GetDesktopWindow();
[DllImport("user32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
public static extern IntPtr GetWindowDC(IntPtr window);
[DllImport("gdi32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
public static extern uint GetPixel(IntPtr dc, int x, int y);
[DllImport("user32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
public static extern int ReleaseDC(IntPtr window, IntPtr dc);

public static Color GetColorAt(int x, int y)
{
    IntPtr desk = GetDesktopWindow();
    IntPtr dc = GetWindowDC(desk);
    int a = (int) GetPixel(dc, x, y);
    ReleaseDC(desk, dc);
    return Color.FromArgb(255, (a >> 0) & 0xff, (a >> 8) & 0xff, (a >> 16) & 0xff);
}

I think this is the cleanest and quickest way.

Note:

If you have modified the default text size among the Display Settings on Windows to increase readability on a high resolution display, the coordinate parameters of GetPixel() need to be adjusted the same way. For example, if the cursor location is (x,y) with 150% of text size on Windows 7, you need to call GetPixel(x*1.5, y*1.5) to get the color of the pixel under the cursor.

2
  • 1
    Habib, the note you added is not part of my answer. It's not my know-how, it's yours. Please make a comment, if you can. Then you can get upvotes on the comment. Besides I think adjusting x and y at GetPixel is misplaced. It's better to check for resolution adjustments and cursor position somewhere outside the GetColorAt-method.
    – Bitterblue
    Sep 15, 2016 at 9:25
  • +1 for the note about the text size on the display. If there's a different text size other than 100% and it's not properly adjusted, the method will get colors from the wrong pixels.
    – marcus
    Oct 25, 2017 at 15:23
14

This function is shorter and can achieve the same result using System.Drawing, without Pinvoke.

Color GetColorAt(int x, int y)
{
    Bitmap bmp = new Bitmap(1, 1);
    Rectangle bounds = new Rectangle(x, y, 1, 1);
    using (Graphics g = Graphics.FromImage(bmp))
        g.CopyFromScreen(bounds.Location, Point.Empty, bounds.Size);
    return bmp.GetPixel(0, 0);
}
1
  • 1
    Perfect, thanks. ----- Point CursorPosition = Cursor.Position; this.BackColor = GetColorAt(CursorPosition.X, CursorPosition.Y);
    – user1853517
    Jan 23, 2023 at 14:22
6

Please check this two different functions I have used in one of my previous projects :

1) This function takes snapshot of Desktop

private void CaptureScreenAndSave(string strSavePath)
        {

            //SetTitle("Capturing Screen...");

            Bitmap bmpScreenshot;

            Graphics gfxScreenshot;
            bmpScreenshot = new Bitmap(Screen.PrimaryScreen.Bounds.Width, Screen.PrimaryScreen.Bounds.Height,System.Drawing.Imaging.PixelFormat.Format32bppArgb);
            gfxScreenshot = Graphics.FromImage(bmpScreenshot);
            gfxScreenshot.CopyFromScreen(Screen.PrimaryScreen.Bounds.X, Screen.PrimaryScreen.Bounds.Y, 0, 0, Screen.PrimaryScreen.Bounds.Size, CopyPixelOperation.SourceCopy);
            MemoryStream msIn = new MemoryStream();
            bmpScreenshot.Save(msIn, System.Drawing.Imaging.ImageCodecInfo.GetImageEncoders()[0], null);

            msIn.Close();

            byte[] buf = msIn.ToArray();

            MemoryStream msOut = new MemoryStream();

            msOut.Write(buf, 0, buf.Length);

            msOut.Position = 0;

            Bitmap bmpOut = new Bitmap(msOut);

            try
            {
                bmpOut.Save(strSavePath, System.Drawing.Imaging.ImageFormat.Bmp);
                //SetTitle("Capturing Screen Image Saved...");
            }

            catch (Exception exp)
            {

            }

            finally
            {
                msOut.Close();
            }
        }

2) This function takes an image in input and calculates RGB average of pixel range given.

double GetRGBAverageForPixelRange( int istartRange, int iEndRange,  Bitmap oBitmap )
        {
            double dRetnVal = 0 ;
            Color oTempColor ; 
            int i, j ;
            for( int iCounter = istartRange ; iCounter < iEndRange ; iCounter++ )
            {
                i = (iCounter % (oBitmap.Width));
                j = ( iCounter / ( oBitmap.Width ) ) ;
                if (i >= 0 && j >= 0 && i < oBitmap.Width && j < oBitmap.Height )
                {
                    oTempColor = oBitmap.GetPixel(i, j);
                    dRetnVal = dRetnVal + oTempColor.ToArgb();
                }

            }
            return dRetnVal ;
        }

This two functions together might solve your problem. Happy Coding :)

EDIT : Please note that GetPixel is very slow function. I will think twice befor using it.

4

As far as I know the easiest way to do this is to:

  1. take a screenshot
  2. look at the bitmap and get the pixel color

Edit

There is probably no way to "wait" until the pixel changes to a certain color. Your program will probably have to just loop and check it every so often until it sees the color.

For example:

while(!IsPixelColor(x, y, color))
{
    //probably best to add a sleep here so your program doesn't use too much CPU
}
DoAction();

EDIT 2

Here is some sample code you can modify. This code just changes the color of a label based on the current color in a given pixel. This code avoids the handle leak mentioned.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Threading;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

namespace WindowsFormsApplication1
{
public partial class Form1 : Form
{

    [DllImport("gdi32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto, SetLastError = true, ExactSpelling = true)]
    public static extern int BitBlt(IntPtr hDC, int x, int y, int nWidth, int nHeight, IntPtr hSrcDC, int xSrc, int ySrc, int dwRop);


    Thread t;
    int x, y;

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        x = 20;
        y = 50;
        t = new Thread(update);
        t.Start();
    }

    private void update()
    {
        Bitmap screenCopy = new Bitmap(1, 1);
        using (Graphics gdest = Graphics.FromImage(screenCopy))
        {
            while (true)
            {
                //g.CopyFromScreen(new Point(0, 0), new Point(0, 0), new Size(256, 256));
                using (Graphics gsrc = Graphics.FromHwnd(IntPtr.Zero))
                {
                    IntPtr hSrcDC = gsrc.GetHdc();
                    IntPtr hDC = gdest.GetHdc();
                    int retval = BitBlt(hDC, 0, 0, 1, 1, hSrcDC, x, y, (int)CopyPixelOperation.SourceCopy);
                    gdest.ReleaseHdc();
                    gsrc.ReleaseHdc();
                }
                Color c = Color.FromArgb(screenCopy.GetPixel(0, 0).ToArgb());
                label1.ForeColor = c;
            }
        }
    }
}

}

4
  • I would rather not do it this way, I have thought about it but it just isn't an option. The pixel has to be watched like constantly as it will find the pixel it is looking for in under a minute, constantly.
    – Brandon
    Sep 27, 2009 at 17:03
  • Then don't put a sleep. This loop would probably take all of .1 seconds to loop through worst case.
    – tster
    Sep 27, 2009 at 17:19
  • 1
    Note that you should not run .CopyFromScreen, it has a handle leakage, the best is to implement this code yourself using Win32 API Sep 27, 2009 at 17:31
  • 1
    Bitmap.GetPixel() returns a Color so i see no reason to call ToArgb() and passing it into Color.FromArgb()
    – Dutchs
    Nov 18, 2017 at 19:04
-1

This line uses About 10 ms.

int retval = BitBlt(hDC, 0, 0, 1, 1, hSrcDC, location.X, location.Y, (int)CopyPixelOperation.SourceCopy);

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.