4

I have a bunch of data in a database that i want to write a search function for. The problem is that i'm getting many duplicates. The data is structured in Names and Surnames and i want to only send one unique of both so if i have two people with the first name Foo, and surname Bar only one will show.

No matter how I think of it I always come back to that I need to compare them.

var names = db.People
      .Where(r => r.Name.Contains(q))
      .OrderBy(r=> r.Name)
       *Psuedo-Code*
       if((this.Name==next.Name)&&(this.surSame==next.Surname)
           toss next data and loop to next
       *Psuedo-Code*
      .Take(5);

Maybe a bit messy, but you get the idea what I want to achieve. Can I do this in some way or is there any better way to go about it?

  • 5
    Sounds like .Distinct might work for your purposes. – zimdanen Feb 12 '13 at 19:43
  • yeah, i have tried it but did not get my head around how to use it for this purpose. If i go distinct on the Name or Surname i will only get one. – Tim Feb 12 '13 at 19:47
  • What is db? Or: is this linq to sql? – Gert Arnold Feb 12 '13 at 19:49
10

You could do this:

var names = db.People
    .Where(r => r.Name.Contains(q))
    .Select(r => new { Name = r.Name, Surname = r.Surname })
    .Distinct()
    .Take(5);

But if that won't work because you need the whole People record, you just want the first, I've done something like this with success:

var names = db.People
   .Where(r => r.Name.Contains(q))
   .GroupBy(r => new { Name = r.Name, Surname = r.Surname })
   .Select(g => g.First())
   .Take(5);
  • It looks like you had the same answer as me, 1 minute faster. The new { Name = r.Name, Surname = r.Surname } anonymous type declaration can actually be replaced with the shorter but equivalent new { r.Name, r.Surname } if you like. – Timothy Shields Feb 12 '13 at 19:57
  • Thanks! I was about to throw my laptop out the window. The only change i had to do was to to use "FirstorDefault" instead of first due to other functions. Again, big thanks. It made my day! :) – Tim Feb 12 '13 at 19:59
4

Distinct utilizing Equals on People class would be the correct way, but here's an alternative that is more "inline":

var names = db.People
  .Where(r => r.Name.Contains(q))
  .GroupBy(r => new { r.Name, r.Surname })
  .Select(g => g.First())
  .OrderBy(r => r.Name)
  .Take(5);
2

Use Distinct() and implement the method Equals in People class, or use an auxiliary class to compare them:

public class PeopleComparer : IEqualityComparer<People>
{
    public bool Equals(People x, People y)
    {
        return x.Name == y.Name && x.Surname == y.Surname;
    }

    public int GetHashCode(People obj)
    {
        unchecked
        {
            return (obj.Name.GetHashCode() * 31) + obj.Surname.GetHashCode();
        }
    }
}
  • 3
    You would also need a sensible GetHashCode implementation. – Servy Feb 12 '13 at 19:48
  • Yes, I think it's better to delegate the GetHashCode calculation to People class as it is now. – A. Rodas Feb 12 '13 at 20:02
  • No, actually, not at all. In fact doing so breaks the implementation. It's essential that the hash code and equality be based on the same "thing". The hash code should be based on the name and surname, just like the equality. – Servy Feb 12 '13 at 20:11
  • Ok, I thought you meant to move the code to the People class, because if he implements the Equals, the GetHashCode calculation should be the same. So then the first version is good enough, since it uses a prime number to multiply the first hash code. – A. Rodas Feb 12 '13 at 20:25
  • 1
    You would also want to wrap the body of GetHashCode with unchecked { ... }. – Timothy Shields Feb 12 '13 at 20:26

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