Given this function, I want to replace the color with a random color generator.

document.overlay = GPolyline.fromEncoded({
    color: "#0000FF",
    weight: 10,
    points: encoded_points,
    zoomFactor: 32,
    levels: encoded_levels,
    numLevels: 4
});

How can I do it?

46 Answers 46

up vote 776 down vote accepted

Use getRandomColor() in place of "#0000FF":

function getRandomColor() {
  var letters = '0123456789ABCDEF';
  var color = '#';
  for (var i = 0; i < 6; i++) {
    color += letters[Math.floor(Math.random() * 16)];
  }
  return color;
}



function setRandomColor() {
  $("#colorpad").css("background-color", getRandomColor());
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div id="colorpad" style="width:300px;height:300px;background-color:#000">

</div>
<button onclick="setRandomColor()">Random Color</button>

  • 73
    Note that this has a bias towards quite dark and unsaturated colors because of the way RGB wraps the color space. Martin Ankerl has a nice article about generating colors from other spaces (like HSV) as well: martin.ankerl.com/2009/12/09/… – Thomas Ahle Jan 10 '12 at 10:53
  • 10
    The chances of hitting 0 or 15 when using Math.round(Math.random()*15) are only 1:30, while the other numbers' chances are 1:15. – user123444555621 Jun 4 '12 at 15:32
  • For anyone who is looking to limit the spectrum to light colors, you can set the letters to '789ABCD' and reduce the multiplier to letters[Math.round(Math.random() * 6)];. Just to note that I removed the low and high range just to avoid the extreme colors i.e. white and black. – KevinIsNowOnline Sep 12 '13 at 8:24
  • 3
    You can remove .split('') call. String already have Array indexer. – Ujeenator Jul 27 '15 at 6:08
  • 1
    You could also use a Generator Function as such – tsuz Aug 26 '16 at 11:01

I doubt anything will be faster or shorter than this one:

"#"+((1<<24)*Math.random()|0).toString(16)

Challenge!

  • 14
    You forgot to pad with zeroes. – user123444555621 May 1 '11 at 21:12
  • 115
    '#'+(Math.random()*0xFFFFFF<<0).toString(16); – Mohsen May 6 '11 at 7:49
  • 11
    @Mohsen, FYI every now and then your code produces invalid 5 digit number – rochal Nov 5 '11 at 18:05
  • 6
    The result is not padded to 6 digits – Taha Jahangir Mar 1 '12 at 9:03
  • 25
    ('00000'+(Math.random()*(1<<24)|0).toString(16)).slice(-6) will always return a length of 6. though this method will still (rarely) return small numbers that give results like 000cf4 or 0000a7 which is a bit hacky i think. in these cases the red component does not contribute to the random color. – bryc Nov 27 '12 at 20:52

Here is another take on this problem.

My goal was to create vibrant and distinct colors. To ensure the colors are distinct I avoid using a random generator and select "evenly spaced" colors from the rainbow.

This is perfect for creating pop-out markers in Google Maps that have optimal "uniqueness" (that is, no two markers will have similar colors).

function rainbow(numOfSteps, step) {
    // This function generates vibrant, "evenly spaced" colours (i.e. no clustering). This is ideal for creating easily distinguishable vibrant markers in Google Maps and other apps.
    // Adam Cole, 2011-Sept-14
    // HSV to RBG adapted from: http://mjijackson.com/2008/02/rgb-to-hsl-and-rgb-to-hsv-color-model-conversion-algorithms-in-javascript
    var r, g, b;
    var h = step / numOfSteps;
    var i = ~~(h * 6);
    var f = h * 6 - i;
    var q = 1 - f;
    switch(i % 6){
        case 0: r = 1; g = f; b = 0; break;
        case 1: r = q; g = 1; b = 0; break;
        case 2: r = 0; g = 1; b = f; break;
        case 3: r = 0; g = q; b = 1; break;
        case 4: r = f; g = 0; b = 1; break;
        case 5: r = 1; g = 0; b = q; break;
    }
    var c = "#" + ("00" + (~ ~(r * 255)).toString(16)).slice(-2) + ("00" + (~ ~(g * 255)).toString(16)).slice(-2) + ("00" + (~ ~(b * 255)).toString(16)).slice(-2);
    return (c);
}

If you wish to see what this looks like in action see http://blog.adamcole.ca/2011/11/simple-javascript-rainbow-color.html.

  • 6
    I've been looking for something like this! Great stuff! – Khôi Oct 17 '12 at 19:31
  • I've made a simplified implementation of the same idea as the answer to similar question stackoverflow.com/a/14187677/421010 – Andrew Jan 6 '13 at 22:54
  • 4
    This is exactly what I was looking for. Almost magic. – azz Oct 19 '13 at 4:43
  • 10
    So what will be parameter's value ? – Ekramul Hoque Apr 27 '15 at 12:02
  • 1
    I also created something like this, but it is quite random and quite distinct. The pseudo-code is here. It uses hsv rather than rgb, because hsv has much more predictable behavior. If you care to see the Python implementation, I used it here and here. You'll have to search through the code for "color". – zondo Feb 9 '16 at 22:03

Who can beat it?

'#'+Math.random().toString(16).substr(-6);

Guaranteed to work all the time: http://jsbin.com/OjELIfo/2/edit

Based on @eterps comment the code above can still generate shorter strings if hexadecimal representation of the random color is very short (0.730224609375 => 0.baf)

This code should work in all cases:

function makeRandomColor(){
  var c = '';
  while (c.length < 7) {
    c += (Math.random()).toString(16).substr(-6).substr(-1)
  }
  return '#'+c;
}
  • 8
    When Math.random() returns 0.022092682472568126 this code produces invalid '#5a7dd' string. crazy! – rochal Nov 5 '11 at 18:10
  • @rochal You are right. I've updated it. – Mohsen Oct 10 '13 at 0:00
  • Like this one since #ffffff don't appear too often. – Warface Dec 1 '14 at 16:06
  • There are quite a few occurrences where this will not work. Check the following output for Math.random()... 0.730224609375, 0.43603515625, 0.957763671875, and the list goes on... – eterps Mar 27 '15 at 1:48
  • @eterps please see my updated answer – Mohsen Mar 28 '15 at 16:49

There is no need for a hash of hexadecimal letters. JavaScript can do this by itself:

function get_random_color() {
  function c() {
    var hex = Math.floor(Math.random()*256).toString(16);
    return ("0"+String(hex)).substr(-2); // pad with zero
  }
  return "#"+c()+c()+c();
}
  • it generates many invalid colors..#96aee, #503e0 – vsync Feb 10 '16 at 17:24
  • I edited my answer – Alsciende Feb 15 '16 at 13:20

I like this one: '#' + (Math.random().toString(16) + "000000").substring(2,8)

  • Or '#' + Math.floor(Math.random()*16777215).toString(16); – Mohammad Anini Jun 9 '15 at 7:55
  • @MohammadAnin that has a 1 in 16 chance of producing less than 6 digits – James Mar 24 '16 at 20:47
  • This might generate invalid colours. For example'#' + (0.125).toString(16).substring(2, 8) === '#2'. It is dangerous because the probability is low (1 in 4096 I think) so a bug is likely to get through testing. You should ('#' + Math.random().toString(16) + "000000").substring(2, 8) – James Mar 24 '16 at 20:55
  • Correction: should be '#' + (Math.random().toString(16) + "000000").substring(2,8) – James Mar 24 '16 at 21:06

Random color generation with brightness control:

function getRandColor(brightness){

    // Six levels of brightness from 0 to 5, 0 being the darkest
    var rgb = [Math.random() * 256, Math.random() * 256, Math.random() * 256];
    var mix = [brightness*51, brightness*51, brightness*51]; //51 => 255/5
    var mixedrgb = [rgb[0] + mix[0], rgb[1] + mix[1], rgb[2] + mix[2]].map(function(x){ return Math.round(x/2.0)})
    return "rgb(" + mixedrgb.join(",") + ")";
}
  • 1
    Very cool, though mostly generates 'pastels' rather than more vibrant colors that I was hoping when I saw brightness. Still going into my bag of tricks! – JayCrossler Jun 25 '12 at 3:49
  • I really like this one because you can customize it to be in harmony with your website color palette – Emanuel Gianico May 15 '15 at 18:30
'#'+Math.random().toString(16).slice(-3) // three-numbers format aka #f3c
'#'+Math.random().toString(16).slice(-6) // six-number format aka #abc123
  • I like this for it's legibility – hitautodestruct Apr 9 at 8:26
  • This is the cleanest code – Xin May 9 at 15:31

You can aslo use HSL available on every good browser (http://caniuse.com/#feat=css3-colors)

function randomHsl() {
    return 'hsla(' + (Math.random() * 360) + ', 100%, 50%, 1)';
}

This will give you only bright colors, you can also play around with the brightness, saturation and alpha.

// es6
const randomHsl = () => `hsla(${Math.random() * 360}, 100%, 50%, 1)`
  • Thanks! I managed to get perfect colors for backgrounds with: 'hsla(' + (Math.floor(Math.random()*360) + ', 100%, 70%, 1)' – jj_ Oct 28 '14 at 18:23
  • 1
    No prob, I was surprised to see no one using the power of hsl :) – kigiri Oct 29 '14 at 12:47
  • stackoverflow.com/a/23861752/1693593, hsla is not needed it alpha=1, just use hsl – user1693593 Jun 17 '15 at 7:10
  • 1
    The point is to customize the colour as much as possible. – NetOperator Wibby Apr 10 '17 at 16:56
  • The best of the best and the brightest! :) – Kenigmatic Sep 29 '17 at 7:25

Here's a twist on the solution provided by @Anatoliy.

I needed to generate only light colours (for backgrounds), so I went with three letter (#AAA) format:

function get_random_color() {
    var letters = 'ABCDE'.split('');
    var color = '#';
    for (var i=0; i<3; i++ ) {
        color += letters[Math.floor(Math.random() * letters.length)];
    }
    return color;
}
  • 1
    I did exactly the same :) Great minds thinks alike ! – Cedric Jun 5 '13 at 22:01

The article written by Paul Irish on Random Hex Color Code Generator in JavaScript is absolutely amazing. Use:

'#'+Math.floor(Math.random()*16777215).toString(16);

Here is the source link:

http://www.paulirish.com/2009/random-hex-color-code-snippets/

  • 3
    this will sometime return non well-formed color values like "1fa4c" (need to be 3 or 6 characters) – jj_ Oct 28 '14 at 18:05
  • 1
    @jj_ is it? sorry I didn't noticed that. Thanks for sharing – way2vin Oct 28 '14 at 18:51

This can be very easily be found using Google Search:

function random_color(format)
{
    var rint = Math.round(0xffffff * Math.random());
    switch(format)
    {
        case 'hex':
            return ('#0' + rint.toString(16)).replace(/^#0([0-9a-f]{6})$/i, '#$1');
            break;

        case 'rgb':
            return 'rgb(' + (rint >> 16) + ',' + (rint >> 8 & 255) + ',' + (rint & 255) + ')';
            break;

        default:
            return rint;
            break;
    }
}

Updated version:

function random_color( format ){
  var rint = Math.floor( 0x100000000 * Math.random());
  switch( format ){
    case 'hex':
      return '#' + ('00000'   + rint.toString(16)).slice(-6).toUpperCase();
    case 'hexa':
      return '#' + ('0000000' + rint.toString(16)).slice(-8).toUpperCase();
    case 'rgb':
      return 'rgb('  + (rint & 255) + ',' + (rint >> 8 & 255) + ',' + (rint >> 16 & 255) + ')';
    case 'rgba':
      return 'rgba(' + (rint & 255) + ',' + (rint >> 8 & 255) + ',' + (rint >> 16 & 255) + ',' + (rint >> 24 & 255)/255 + ')';
    default:
      return rint;
  }
}
  • 1
    Maybe so; but to which site would you prefer the possible Google Adwords-revenue went? =) – David Thomas Sep 27 '09 at 21:29
  • 2
    whichever site gives you the answer? if they provide you the answer, they should get the hits. – Funky Dude Sep 27 '09 at 23:17
  • 1
    @FunkyDude now this result is the top one on google & the reason stackoverflow exists is to not use google too often ;) – Akshat Dec 29 '13 at 16:20
var color = "#";
for (k = 0; k < 3; k++) {
    color += ("0" + (Math.random()*256|0).toString(16)).substr(-2);
}

A breakdown of how this works:

Math.random()*256 gets a random (floating point) number from 0 to 256 (0 to 255 inclusive)
Example result: 116.15200161933899

Adding the |0 strips off everything after the decimal point.
Ex: 116.15200161933899 -> 116

Using .toString(16) converts this number to hexadecimal (base 16).
Ex: 116 -> 74
Another ex: 228 -> e4

Adding "0" pads it with a zero. This will be important when we get the substring, since our final result must have two characters for each color.
Ex: 74 -> 074
Another ex: 8 -> 08

.substr(-2) gets just the last two characters.
Ex: 074 -> 74
Another ex: 08 -> 08 (if we hadn't added the "0", this would have produced "8" instead of "08")

The for loop runs this loop three times, adding each result to the color string, producing something like this:
#7408e4

  • You should flesh out your answer. – joce Mar 26 '13 at 4:21
  • 2
    Good point. I've now added a breakdown. – Erin Heyming Oct 22 '13 at 20:01

If you're a noob like me, clueless about hexadecimals and such, this might be more intuitive.

function r() { return Math.floor(Math.random() * 255) }

var color = 'rgb(' + r() + "," + r() + "," + r() + ')';

You just need to end up with a string such as 'rgb(255, 123, 220)'

  • this answer needs to be the top one – Gil Epshtain Feb 11 at 12:15

So whilst all the answers here are good I wanted a bit more control over the output. For instance I'd like to prevent any near white shades, whilst ensuring I get bright vibrant colours not washed out shades.

function generateColor(ranges) {
            if (!ranges) {
                ranges = [
                    [150,256],
                    [0, 190],
                    [0, 30]
                ];
            }
            var g = function() {
                //select random range and remove
                var range = ranges.splice(Math.floor(Math.random()*ranges.length), 1)[0];
                //pick a random number from within the range
                return Math.floor(Math.random() * (range[1] - range[0])) + range[0];
            }
            return "rgb(" + g() + "," + g() + "," + g() +")";
        };

So now I can specify 3 arbitrary ranges to pick rgb values from. You can call it with no arguments and get my default set which will usually generate a quite vibrant colour with once obvious dominant shade, or you can supply your own array of ranges.

  • 1
    Google Map API supports only hexadecimal HTML color in the "#FFFFFF" format. – Valery Viktorovsky Jul 2 '10 at 14:34
  • Sure, pretty straightforward to convert a number to hex n.toString(16) only snag is you'll need to zero pad to make sure you get a two character return value from the inner g function. – Ollie Edwards Jul 9 '10 at 10:57

Short answer with pad to exact size

'#'+((1<<24)*(Math.random()+1)|0).toString(16).substr(1)

Yet another random color generator:

var randomColor;
randomColor = Math.random() * 0x1000000; // 0 < randomColor < 0x1000000 (randomColor is a float)
randomColor = Math.floor(randomColor); // 0 < randomColor <= 0xFFFFFF (randomColor is an integer)
randomColor = randomColor.toString(16); // hex representation randomColor
randomColor = ("000000" + randomColor).slice(-6); // leading zeros added
randomColor = "#" + randomColor; // # added

Array.prototype.reduce makes it very clean.

["r","g","b"].reduce(function(res) {
    return res + ("0"+~~(Math.random()*256).toString(16)).slice(-2)
}, "#")

Needs a shim for old browsers.

You could use this simple function

function getRandomColor(){
 var color =  "#" + (Math.random() * 0xFFFFFF << 0).toString(16);
 return color;
}

The top voted comment of the top answer suggests that Martin Ankerl's approach is better than random hex numbers, and although I haven't improved on Ankerl's methodology, I have successfully translated it to JavaScript. I figured I'd post an additional answer to this already mega-sized SO thread because the top answer has another comment linking to a Gist with the JS implementation of Ankerl's logic and that link is broken (404). If I had the reputation, I would have simply commented the jsbin link I created.

// adapted from
// http://jsfiddle.net/Mottie/xcqpF/1/light/
const rgb2hex = (rgb) => {
 return (rgb && rgb.length === 3) ? "#" +
  ("0" + parseInt(rgb[0],10).toString(16)).slice(-2) +
  ("0" + parseInt(rgb[1],10).toString(16)).slice(-2) +
  ("0" + parseInt(rgb[2],10).toString(16)).slice(-2) : '';
}

// next two methods converted from Ruby to JS
// soured from http://martin.ankerl.com/2009/12/09/how-to-create-random-colors-programmatically/

// # HSV values in [0..1[
// # returns [r, g, b] values from 0 to 255
const hsv_to_rgb = (h, s, v) => {
  const h_i = Math.floor(h*6)
  const f = h*6 - h_i
  const p = v * (1 - s)
  const q = v * (1 - (f * s))
  const t = v * (1 - (1 - f) * s)
  let r, g, b
  switch(h_i){
    case(0):
      [r, g, b] = [v, t, p]
      break
    case(1):
      [r, g, b] = [q, v, p]
      break
    case(2):
      [r, g, b] = [p, v, t]
      break
    case(3):
      [r, g, b] = [p, q, v]
      break
    case(4):
      [r, g, b] = [t, p, v]
      break
    case(5):
      [r, g, b] = [v, p, q]
      break
  }
  return [Math.floor(r * 256), Math.floor(g * 256), Math.floor(b * 256)]
}

// # use golden ratio
const golden_ratio_conjugate = 0.618033988749895
let h = Math.random() // # use random start value
const gen_hex = (numberOfColors) => {
  const colorArray = []
  while (numberOfColors > 0) {
    h += golden_ratio_conjugate
    h %= 1
    colorArray.push(rgb2hex(hsv_to_rgb(h, 0.99, 0.99)))
    numberOfColors -= 1
  }
  console.log(colorArray)
  return colorArray
}

gen_hex(100)

https://jsbin.com/qeyevoj/edit?js,console

ES6 version.

Random color

`#${Math.floor(Math.random() * 0x1000000).toString(16).padStart(6, 0)}`

Random alpha, random color.

`#${Math.floor(Math.random() * 0x100000000).toString(16).padStart(8, 0)}`
function get_random_color() {
    return "#" + (Math.round(Math.random() * 0XFFFFFF)).toString(16);
}

http://jsfiddle.net/XmqDz/1/

Use distinct-colors.

It generates a palette of visually distinct colors.

distinct-colors is highly configurable:

  • Choose how many colors are in the palette
  • Restrict the hue to a specific range
  • Restrict the chroma (saturation) to a specific range
  • Restrict the lightness to a specific range
  • Configure general quality of the palette
  • 3541 lines of code..where other answers here are ~6-10 lines...i'm impressed how did somebody wrote so many lines of code just to pick distinct colors.. – vsync Feb 10 '16 at 17:25
  • Picking truly visually distinct colors requires a lot more math than just a random color generator. – InternalFX Feb 10 '16 at 17:38
  • I just did it in 2 lines.. modified this function: stackoverflow.com/a/20129594/104380 – vsync Feb 10 '16 at 17:39
  • It's not that simple. suggested reading – InternalFX Feb 10 '16 at 17:42
  • Thanks, very interesting article. my method always provides the same colors, and results are consistent and distinctive. I guess in some situations you might need really random, well distributed colors which are pretty to the human eye. – vsync Feb 10 '16 at 18:03

Here are my two versions for a random hex code generator.


/* Slowest but shortest. */
"#000000".replace(/0/g,function(){return (~~(Math.random()*16)).toString(16);});    

/* Good performance with small size. */
"#"+(function(a,b){while(a--){b+=""+(~~(Math.random()*16)).toString(16);} return b;})(6,"");

/* Remy Sharp provided one that's the fastest but a little bit too long */
(function(h){return '#000000'.substr(0,7-h.length)+h})((~~(Math.random()*(1<<24))).toString(16))

This function goes above and beyond other answers in two ways:

It attempts to generate colors as distinct as possible by finding which color out of 20 tries has the farthest euclidian distance from the others in the HSV cone

It allows you to restrict the hue, saturation, or value range, but still attempts to pick colors as distinct as possible within that range.

It's not super efficient, but for reasonable values (who could even pick apart 100 colors easily?) It's fast enough.

See JSFiddle

  /**
   * Generates a random palette of HSV colors.  Attempts to pick colors
   * that are as distinct as possible within the desired HSV range.
   *
   * @param {number}    [options.numColors=10] - the number of colors to generate
   * @param {number[]}  [options.hRange=[0,1]] - the maximum range for generated hue
   * @param {number[]}  [options.sRange=[0,1]] - the maximum range for generated saturation
   * @param {number[]}  [options.vRange=[0,1]] - the maximum range for generated value
   * @param {number[][]}[options.exclude=[[0,0,0],[0,0,1]]] - colors to exclude
   * 
   * @returns {number[][]} an array of HSV colors (each HSV color 
   * is a [hue, saturation, value] array)
   */
  function randomHSVPalette(options) {
    function random(min, max) {
      return min + Math.random() * (max - min);
    } 

    function HSVtoXYZ(hsv) {
      var h = hsv[0];
      var s = hsv[1];
      var v = hsv[2];
      var angle = h * Math.PI * 2;
      return [Math.sin(angle) * s * v,
              Math.cos(angle) * s * v,
              v];
    }

    function distSq(a, b) {
      var dx = a[0] - b[0];
      var dy = a[1] - b[1];
      var dz = a[2] - b[2];
      return dx * dx + dy * dy + dz * dz;
    }

    if (!options) {
      options = {};
    }

    var numColors = options.numColors || 10;
    var hRange = options.hRange || [0, 1];
    var sRange = options.sRange || [0, 1];
    var vRange = options.vRange || [0, 1];
    var exclude = options.exclude || [[0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 1]];

    var points = exclude.map(HSVtoXYZ);
    var result = [];

    while (result.length < numColors) {
      var bestHSV;
      var bestXYZ;
      var bestDist = 0;
      for (var i = 0; i < 20; i++) {
        var hsv = [random(hRange[0], hRange[1]), random(sRange[0], sRange[1]), random(vRange[0], vRange[1])];
        var xyz = HSVtoXYZ(hsv);
        var minDist = 10;
        points.forEach(function(point) {
          minDist = Math.min(minDist, distSq(xyz, point));
        });
        if (minDist > bestDist) {
          bestHSV = hsv;
          bestXYZ = xyz;
          bestDist = minDist;
        }
      }
      points.push(bestXYZ);
      result.push(bestHSV);
    }

    return result;
  }

  function HSVtoRGB(hsv) {
    var h = hsv[0];
    var s = hsv[1];
    var v = hsv[2];

    var i = ~~(h * 6);
    var f = h * 6 - i;
    var p = v * (1 - s);
    var q = v * (1 - f * s);
    var t = v * (1 - (1 - f) * s);
    v = ~~(255 * v);
    p = ~~(255 * p);
    q = ~~(255 * q); 
    t = ~~(255 * t);
    switch (i % 6) {
      case 0: return [v, t, p];
      case 1: return [q, v, p];
      case 2: return [p, v, t];
      case 3: return [p, q, v];
      case 4: return [t, p, v];
      case 5: return [v, p, q];
    }
  }

  function RGBtoCSS(rgb) {
    var r = rgb[0];
    var g = rgb[1];
    var b = rgb[2];
    var rgb = (r << 16) + (g << 8) + b;
    return '#' + ('000000' + rgb.toString(16)).slice(-6);
  }

Almost all of the previous short hand methods are generating invalid hex codes (five digits). I came across a similar technique only without that issue here:

"#"+("000"+(Math.random()*(1<<24)|0).toString(16)).substr(-6)

Test

Try this in the console:

for(i = 0; i < 200; i++) {
    console.log("#" + ("000" + (Math.random()*(1<<24)|0).toString(16)).substr(-6));
}
  • 2
    I made a for-loop that ran this code 20000 times and only printed to the console if the length was less than 7, and I did find a case where the string was less than 6 characters. Also, one problem with this code is that it only pads the entire 6-digit string, not the individual 2-digit color codes, which means you're more likely to have zeroes in the red value than in the green or blue values. – Erin Heyming Mar 26 '13 at 3:46

There are so many ways you can accomplish this. Here's two I did:

Generates six random hex digits (0-F)

function randColor() {
    for (var i=0, col=''; i<6; i++) {
        col += (Math.random()*16|0).toString(16);
    }
    return '#'+col;
}

Generates individual RGB components (00-FF)

function randColor2() {
    var r = ('0'+(Math.random()*256|0).toString(16)).slice(-2),
        g = ('0'+(Math.random()*256|0).toString(16)).slice(-2),
        b = ('0'+(Math.random()*256|0).toString(16)).slice(-2);
    return '#' +r+g+b;
}

You can use colorchain.js to generate a sequence of colors with varying hues.

This method will get a random number, convert it to a hexidecimal string and then extract a part of it, giving you a random hex.

function randomColor() {
    return "#" + Math.random().toString(16).slice(2,8);
}
  • 1
    Hi Anish, thanks for your answer, however answers on SO should explain why or how a piece of code answers the question, rather than just pasting a block of code. Please see How do I write a good answer? – Tim Malone May 26 '16 at 23:06
  • Ok i'll keep that in mind for next time, Thanks! – Anish Kasam May 27 '16 at 13:26

My version:

function RandomColor() {
  var hex = (Math.round(Math.random()*0xffffff)).toString(16);
  while (hex.length < 6) hex = "0" + hex;
  return hex;
}
  • I think the not-random 0 makes the color not random enough XD – shrekuu May 22 '15 at 4:00
  • We randonly generate a hexadecinal number from 0 to ffffff. Which is a perfect uniform distribution. That zero is only to complete string, because of browser usage considerations. I suggest you look more careful at this solution. – Prostakov May 22 '15 at 19:40
  • I did make a few adjustments though, not linked to your comment :) – Prostakov May 22 '15 at 19:42
  • Thanks Prostakov. :D – shrekuu May 23 '15 at 9:11

protected by Community Jun 17 '15 at 16:08

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