35

I am looking for a way to dynamically construct filters using SQLAlchemy. That is, given the column, the operator name and the comparing value, construct the corresponding filter.

I'll try to illustrate using an example (this would be used to build an API). Let's say we have the following model:

class Cat(Model):

  id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
  name = Column(String)
  age = Column(Integer)

I would like to map queries to filters. For example,

  • /cats?filter=age;eq;3 should generate Cat.query.filter(Cat.age == 3)

  • /cats?filter=age;in;5,6,7&filter=id;ge;10 should generate Cat.query.filter(Cat.age.in_([5, 6, 7])).filter(Cat.id >= 10)

I looked around to see how it has been done but couldn't find a way that didn't involve manually mapping each operator name to a comparator or something similar. For instance, Flask-Restless keeps a dictionary of all supported operations and stores the corresponding lambda functions (code here).

I searched in the SQLAlchemy docs and found two potential leads but neither seemed satisfying:

  • using Column.like, Column.in_...: these operators are available directly on the column which would make it simple using getattr but some are still missing (==, >, etc.).

  • using Column.op: e.g. Cat.name.op('=')('Hobbes') but this doesn't seem to work for all operators (in namely).

Is there a clean way to do this without lambda functions?

49

In case this is useful to someone, here is what I ended up doing:

from flask import request

class Parser(object):

  sep = ';'

  # ...

  def filter_query(self, query):
    model_class = self._get_model_class(query) # returns the query's Model
    raw_filters = request.args.getlist('filter')
    for raw in raw_filters:
      try:
        key, op, value = raw.split(self.sep, 3)
      except ValueError:
        raise APIError(400, 'Invalid filter: %s' % raw)
      column = getattr(model_class, key, None)
      if not column:
        raise APIError(400, 'Invalid filter column: %s' % key)
      if op == 'in':
        filt = column.in_(value.split(','))
      else:
        try:
          attr = filter(
            lambda e: hasattr(column, e % op),
            ['%s', '%s_', '__%s__']
          )[0] % op
        except IndexError:
          raise APIError(400, 'Invalid filter operator: %s' % op)
        if value == 'null':
          value = None
        filt = getattr(column, attr)(value)
      query = query.filter(filt)
    return query

This covers all SQLAlchemy column comparators:

  • eq for ==
  • lt for <
  • ge for >=
  • in for in_
  • like for like
  • etc.

The exhaustive list with their corresponding names can be found here.

  • 9
    You, sir, are a genius. Adapted this snippet and it works wonderfully. – bbenne10 Dec 5 '13 at 23:15
  • 4
    Sweet! This is exactly what I have been fighting with how to do. – horcle_buzz Feb 23 '15 at 23:33
  • Could you please explain a little bit on how that lambda works? It's wrapped inside a filter function now, but referencing a string expander outside of the filter function. Will this cause potential problems? – Jinghui Niu Sep 7 '17 at 4:49
  • 1
    @mtth: Can you please explain the following code snippet: attr = filter( lambda e: hasattr(column, e % op), ['%s', '%s_', '__%s__'] )[0] % op part, in details? – JavaSa Dec 1 '17 at 20:48
  • 1
    In python 3 change line to attr = list(filter(lambda e: hasattr(column, e % op_name),['%s', '%s_', '__%s__']))[0] % op_name else you get TypeError: 'filter' object is not subscriptable – Milind Dalvi Jun 24 '19 at 12:14
19

One useful trick while building multiple expression filter:

filter_group = list(Column.in_('a','b'),Column.like('%a'))
query = query.filter(and_(*filter_group))

Using this approach will allow you to combine expressions with and/or logic. Also this will allow you to avoid recursion calls like in your answer.

  • This would be useful for or_ but AFAIK there is no difference between chaining filters and using and_. Where do you see any recursive calls? – mtth Feb 15 '13 at 17:47
  • My bad. I misinterpreted query = query.filter(filt) as recursive call to filter_query – vvladymyrov Feb 15 '13 at 20:00
  • No worries - thanks for the suggestion, it might come in handy if decide to implement more complex filters. – mtth Feb 16 '13 at 13:59
1

You can use sqlalchemy-elasticquery for construct dynamically filters using SQLAlchemy.

?filters={ "age" : 3 }
-1
class Place(db.Model):
    id = db.Column(db.Integer, primary_key=True)
    search_id = db.Column(db.Integer, db.ForeignKey('search.id'), nullable=False)

    @classmethod
    def dinamic_filter(model_class, filter_condition):
        '''
        Return filtered queryset based on condition.
        :param query: takes query
        :param filter_condition: Its a list, ie: [(key,operator,value)]
        operator list:
            eq for ==
            lt for <
            ge for >=
            in for in_
            like for like
            value could be list or a string
        :return: queryset
        '''
        __query = db.session.query(model_class)
        for raw in filter_condition:
            try:
                key, op, value = raw
            except ValueError:
                raise Exception('Invalid filter: %s' % raw)
            column = getattr(model_class, key, None)
            if not column:
                raise Exception('Invalid filter column: %s' % key)
            if op == 'in':
                if isinstance(value, list):
                    filt = column.in_(value)
                else:
                    filt = column.in_(value.split(','))
            else:
                try:
                    attr = list(filter(lambda e: hasattr(column, e % op), ['%s', '%s_', '__%s__']))[0] % op
                except IndexError:
                    raise Exception('Invalid filter operator: %s' % op)
                if value == 'null':
                    value = None
                filt = getattr(column, attr)(value)
            __query = __query.filter(filt)
        return __query

Execute like:

places = Place.dinamic_filter([('search_id', 'eq', 1)]).all()

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