23

What are the advantages of using one over the other in the following:

DATEPART(YEAR, GETDATE())

As opposed to:

YEAR(GETDATE())

Is there is a performance difference? If so, which one is the fastest?

0

2 Answers 2

30

There is no difference. In the execution plan both is translated to as datepart(year,getdate()).

This is true for SQL Server 2005, 2008 and 2012.

select datepart(year, getdate())
from (select 1 x) x

select year(getdate())
from (select 1 x) x

Execution plan.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-16"?>
<ShowPlanXML xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" Version="1.0" Build="9.00.5057.00" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/sqlserver/2004/07/showplan">
  <BatchSequence>
    <Batch>
      <Statements>
        <StmtSimple StatementCompId="1" StatementEstRows="1" StatementId="1" StatementOptmLevel="TRIVIAL" StatementSubTreeCost="1.157E-06" StatementText="select datepart(year, getdate())&#xD;&#xA;from (select 1 x) x&#xD;&#xA;&#xD;" StatementType="SELECT">
          <StatementSetOptions ANSI_NULLS="false" ANSI_PADDING="false" ANSI_WARNINGS="false" ARITHABORT="true" CONCAT_NULL_YIELDS_NULL="false" NUMERIC_ROUNDABORT="false" QUOTED_IDENTIFIER="false" />
          <QueryPlan DegreeOfParallelism="0" CachedPlanSize="8" CompileTime="23" CompileCPU="23" CompileMemory="64">
            <RelOp AvgRowSize="11" EstimateCPU="1.157E-06" EstimateIO="0" EstimateRebinds="0" EstimateRewinds="0" EstimateRows="1" LogicalOp="Constant Scan" NodeId="0" Parallel="false" PhysicalOp="Constant Scan" EstimatedTotalSubtreeCost="1.157E-06">
              <OutputList>
                <ColumnReference Column="Expr1001" />
              </OutputList>
              <RunTimeInformation>
                <RunTimeCountersPerThread Thread="0" ActualRows="1" ActualEndOfScans="1" ActualExecutions="1" />
              </RunTimeInformation>
              <ConstantScan>
                <Values>
                  <Row>
                    <ScalarOperator ScalarString="datepart(year,getdate())">
                      <Identifier>
                        <ColumnReference Column="ConstExpr1002">
                          <ScalarOperator>
                            <Intrinsic FunctionName="datepart">
                              <ScalarOperator>
                                <Const ConstValue="(0)" />
                              </ScalarOperator>
                              <ScalarOperator>
                                <Intrinsic FunctionName="getdate" />
                              </ScalarOperator>
                            </Intrinsic>
                          </ScalarOperator>
                        </ColumnReference>
                      </Identifier>
                    </ScalarOperator>
                  </Row>
                </Values>
              </ConstantScan>
            </RelOp>
          </QueryPlan>
        </StmtSimple>
      </Statements>
    </Batch>
    <Batch>
      <Statements>
        <StmtSimple StatementCompId="2" StatementEstRows="1" StatementId="2" StatementOptmLevel="TRIVIAL" StatementSubTreeCost="1.157E-06" StatementText="select year(getdate())&#xD;&#xA;from (select 1 x) x" StatementType="SELECT">
          <StatementSetOptions ANSI_NULLS="false" ANSI_PADDING="false" ANSI_WARNINGS="false" ARITHABORT="true" CONCAT_NULL_YIELDS_NULL="false" NUMERIC_ROUNDABORT="false" QUOTED_IDENTIFIER="false" />
          <QueryPlan DegreeOfParallelism="0" CachedPlanSize="8" CompileTime="0" CompileCPU="0" CompileMemory="64">
            <RelOp AvgRowSize="11" EstimateCPU="1.157E-06" EstimateIO="0" EstimateRebinds="0" EstimateRewinds="0" EstimateRows="1" LogicalOp="Constant Scan" NodeId="0" Parallel="false" PhysicalOp="Constant Scan" EstimatedTotalSubtreeCost="1.157E-06">
              <OutputList>
                <ColumnReference Column="Expr1001" />
              </OutputList>
              <RunTimeInformation>
                <RunTimeCountersPerThread Thread="0" ActualRows="1" ActualEndOfScans="1" ActualExecutions="1" />
              </RunTimeInformation>
              <ConstantScan>
                <Values>
                  <Row>
                    <ScalarOperator ScalarString="datepart(year,getdate())">
                      <Identifier>
                        <ColumnReference Column="ConstExpr1002">
                          <ScalarOperator>
                            <Intrinsic FunctionName="datepart">
                              <ScalarOperator>
                                <Const ConstValue="(0)" />
                              </ScalarOperator>
                              <ScalarOperator>
                                <Intrinsic FunctionName="getdate" />
                              </ScalarOperator>
                            </Intrinsic>
                          </ScalarOperator>
                        </ColumnReference>
                      </Identifier>
                    </ScalarOperator>
                  </Row>
                </Values>
              </ConstantScan>
            </RelOp>
          </QueryPlan>
        </StmtSimple>
      </Statements>
    </Batch>
  </BatchSequence>
</ShowPlanXML>
17

Actually - using YEAR(..) is preferably for me, since it's considered a deterministic function, so if I use this in a computed column definition

ALTER TABLE dbo.MyTable
ADD YearOfDate AS YEAR(SomeDateColumn)

I can make this column persisted (and store it into the table):

ALTER TABLE dbo.MyTable
ADD YearOfDate AS YEAR(SomeDateColumn) PERSISTED

This does not work for DATEPART(YEAR, SomeDateColumn) (don't ask me why - just noticed this heuristically).

The same applies to MONTH(SomeDate) vs. DATEPART(MONTH, SomeDate).

If you have tables that you need to select from based on the month and year of a date (like SalesDate or something), then having month and years as persisted computed columns (and indexing them) can be a huge performance boost.

5
  • Interesting, I actually don't see this. SQL Fiddle. What am I missing? Commented Feb 13, 2013 at 10:50
  • 1
    Documentation in SQL Server 2008 and 2012 says that datepart is nondeterministic. For SQL Server 2005 there is a list of the nondeterministic arguments to datepart. Looks like documentation has changed but SQL Server has not. Commented Feb 13, 2013 at 11:07
  • @MikaelEriksson: interesting.... I could have sworn it didn't work with DATEPART() AS PERSISTED when I tried it...... but it does now. Thanks for clarifying!
    – marc_s
    Commented Feb 13, 2013 at 12:08
  • @marc_s: interesting #2, I decided to try this for myself - SQL 2014... Created a table with SSMS designer with one computed column defined with YEAR and the other defined with DATEPART. Using SSMS, generating the create script yielded both columns defined with DATEPART CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Dates]( [Day] [date] NOT NULL, [Year] AS (datepart(year,[Day])) PERSISTED, [Year2] AS (datepart(year,[Day])) PERSISTED, CONSTRAINT [PK_Dates] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED ([Day] ASC) ) Commented Mar 15, 2016 at 15:06
  • interesting #3, I tried it again and had SSMS display the generated script, and it indeed included the YEAR computed column - which was converted back to DatePart when going back into the table designer. CREATE TABLE dbo.Table_1 ( Day date NOT NULL, Year1 AS YEAR([Day]) PERSISTED , Year2 AS DATEPART(YEAR, [Day]) PERSISTED ) ON [PRIMARY] GO Commented Mar 15, 2016 at 15:08

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