2

I'm quite new with JavaScript but familiar with python. In Python I get this output:

In [1]: [1,9,[5,4,2]] > [1,9,[14,5,4]]
Out[1]: False

In JavaScript:

> [1,9,[5,4,2]] > [1,9,[14,5,4]]
true

It seems that the arrays are converted into a string before the comparison.

Now i wanted to write a function by myself and walk through the array an compare each element. I came up with this coffeescript code:

compare_list = (a, b)->
    if typeof a == "object" and typeof b != "object"
        return 1
    else if typeof a != "object" and typeof b == "object"
        return -1
    else if typeof a != "object" and typeof b != "object"
        if a > b
            return 1
        else if a < b
            return -1
        else
            return 0
    else if typeof a == "object" and typeof b == "object"
        for i in [0...a.length]
            if i > (b.length-1)
                return 1
            tmp = compare_list a[i], b[i]
            if tmp != 0
                return tmp
        if b.length > a.length
            return -1
        return 0

It works this way but the typeof a == "object" part looks not correct to me. Is there a simpler/better/more robust solution?

Thanks for your help.

  • Solution for what? To check whether a and b are arrays? – Bergi Feb 13 '13 at 12:19
  • Yes, or if there is a simpler solition. – HWM-Rocker Feb 13 '13 at 12:23
  • 2
    Then you should not check for objects, but use Array.isArray – Bergi Feb 13 '13 at 12:25
1

Trying to solve the same issue, I too only came up with a custom solution. https://gist.github.com/ruxkor/2772234

As Javascript is using string coercion when comparing object, I think it is necessary to use a custom comparison function to simulate Python behavior.

  • Use Array.isArray instead of checking a constructor property. – Bergi Feb 13 '13 at 12:26
  • But I don't think that handles the nested lists the question is looking for. – Scott Sauyet Feb 13 '13 at 12:46
  • Bergi: thanks, updated. @ScottSauyet why wouldn't it work? the function calls itself on list elements, pairwise. – Andor Goetzendorff Feb 13 '13 at 14:57
  • Maybe I'm missing something, as I'm not really a CoffeeScript person, but it looks to me as though this would yield cmp([1, 9, [5, 4, 2]], [1, 9, [5, 4]]); // => 0, which is presumably not right. It seems to depend upon the lists having exactly the same structure. I guess it's my interpretation that it should handle this case, as the lists presented do share the same structure... – Scott Sauyet Feb 13 '13 at 15:09
  • @ScottSauyet you are right, thanks! I updated the script and (rudimentary) test accordingly. – Andor Goetzendorff Feb 28 '13 at 13:09
4

This is basically the same algorithm avoiding the typeof operator and doing a little trick in the for loop to not check for the lengths of the arrays every time:

cmp = (a, b) -> (a > b) - (a < b)

cmpArray = (a, b)->
  aIsArray = Array.isArray a
  bIsArray = Array.isArray b

  return cmp a, b if not aIsArray and not bIsArray
  return -1       if not aIsArray and     bIsArray
  return 1        if     aIsArray and not bIsArray

  # Both are arrays.
  len = Math.min a.length, b.length
  for i in [0...len] by 1
    if tmp = cmpArray a[i], b[i]
      return tmp
  a.length - b.length

Unfortunately, CoffeeScript does not provide any sort of pattern matching. That would make this code much more DRY-er. You can fake a poor man's pattern matching using a switch statement if you want:

cmpArray = (a, b)->
  switch "#{Array.isArray a},#{Array.isArray b}"
    when 'false,false' then (a > b) - (a < b) # Compare primitives.
    when 'false,true' then -1
    when 'true,false' then 1
    else
      len = Math.min a.length, b.length
      for i in [0...len] by 1
        if tmp = cmpArray a[i], b[i]
          return tmp
      a.length - b.length

But this is definitely not very idiomatic CoffeeScript. If CoffeeScript supported some kind of pattern matching, i'd definitely go for this kind of slution, as i think it reads very nicely being just a single expression and not relying (too much) on early returns.

  • Ah, that's what my loop would look like in CoffeeScript. Nice! – Bergi Feb 13 '13 at 13:50
1

I had a go at implementing a JavaScript function compareArrays that behaves like array comparison in Python:

function compareArrays(a, b) {
    var aIsArray = Array.isArray(a),
        bIsArray = Array.isArray(b),
        cmp = 0;
    if (!aIsArray || !bIsArray) {
        throw new Error('Can\'t compare array to non-array: ' + a + ', ' + b);
    }

    _.find(a, function (aElem, index) {
        var bElem = b[index];
        if (Array.isArray(aElem) || Array.isArray(bElem)) {
            cmp = compareArrays(aElem, bElem);
        } else {
            cmp = (aElem > bElem) - (aElem < bElem);
        }

        if (cmp !== 0) {
            return true;
        }
    });

    return cmp;
}

It uses Underscore to iterate over arrays, and recurses to handle nested arrays.

See my fiddle which includes a primitive test suite.

Test Results

[1,9,[5,4,2]] < [1,9,[14,5,4]]
[1,[1]] can't be compared to [1,1]
[1,[2]] > [1,[1]]
[2] > [1]
[1] == [1]
[] == []
  • Why find, you don't search for anything? – Bergi Feb 13 '13 at 13:46
  • @Bergi find lets me break early, as opposed to each which does not. – aknuds1 Feb 13 '13 at 14:20
1

Let's make it minimalistic:

function compare(a, b) {
    if (a instanceof Array && b instanceof Array) {
        for (var r, i=0, l=Math.min(a.length, b.length); i<l; i++)
            if (r = compare(a[i], b[i]))
                return r;
        return a.length - b.length;
    } else // use native comparison algorithm, including ToPrimitive conversion
        return (a > b) - (a < b);
}

(using instanceof for Array detection, see this article for discussion)

If you want to make objects always greater than primitives, you can change the last line to

        return (typeof a==="object")-(typeof b==="object") || (a>b)-(a<b);
  • Love the minimalism in this one :). A small caveat though: it doesn't behave exactly like the OP's algorithm, as it'll make some toString conversions in the else case. E.g. compare('a,b', ['a', 'b']) is 0, while it should be -1. I hope you don't bother if i steal the (a > b) - (a < b) trick; it's very sexy! =D – epidemian Feb 13 '13 at 13:36
  • Yeah, it does not exactly behave as the OPs one when types do not match - yet this for example allows comparison of Date objects with numbers and similar. – Bergi Feb 13 '13 at 13:40
  • Nice edit! +1 :) – epidemian Feb 13 '13 at 14:18
0

It's pretty ugly, but this seems to do the job:

var compareLists = function compare(listA, listB) {
    if (Array.isArray(listA)) {
        if (Array.isArray(listB)) {
            if (listA.length == 0) {
                if (listB.length == 0) {
                    return 0;
                } else {
                    return -1;
                }
            } else {
                if (listB.length == 0) {
                    return +1;
                } else {
                    return compare(listA[0], listB[0]) || 
                           compare(listA.slice(1), listB.slice(1));
                }
            }
        } else {
            return -1; // arbitrary decision: arrays are smaller than scalars
        }
    } else {
        if (Array.isArray(listB)) {
            return +1; // arbitrary decision: scalars are larger than arrays
        } else {
            return listA < listB ?  -1 : listA > listB ? + 1 : 0;
        }
    }
};

compareLists([1, 9, [5, 4, 2]], [1, 9, [14, 5, 4]]); // -1
compareLists([1, 9, [5, 4, 2]], [1, 9, [5, 4]]);     // +1
compareLists([1, 9, [5, 4, 2]], [1, 9, [5, 4, 2]]);  //  0

Depending upon your environment, you might want to shim Array.isArray:

if (!Array.isArray) {
    Array.isArray = function (obj) {
        return Object.prototype.toString.call(obj) === "[object Array]";
    };
}

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