I have a table in PostgreSQL, I run a query on it with several conditions that returns multiple rows, ordered by one of the columns. In general it's:

SELECT <some columns> 
FROM mytable
<maybe some joins here>
WHERE <various conditions>
ORDER BY date DESC

Now I'm only interested in getting the first and the last row from this query. I could get them outside of the db, inside my application (and this is what I actually do) but was wondering if for better performance I shouldn't get from the database only those 2 records I'm actually interested in.

And if so, how do I modify my query?

10 Answers 10

up vote 67 down vote accepted

[Caveat: Might not be the most efficient way to do it]:

(SELECT <some columns>
FROM mytable
<maybe some joins here>
WHERE <various conditions>
ORDER BY date DESC
LIMIT 1)

UNION ALL

(SELECT <some columns>
FROM mytable
<maybe some joins here>
WHERE <various conditions>
ORDER BY date ASC    
LIMIT 1)
  • 7
    I think the 'Top' keyword is for SQL server only, MySQL/Postgre uses 'Limit' – Robo Sep 28 '09 at 4:28
  • 1
    You are correct. I will edit mine and vote up yours. – Mitch Wheat Sep 28 '09 at 4:30
  • 2
    Using UNION ALL will make this marginally faster, as it removes a check for duplicates. It'll differ in how it works if the first and last row are the same of course - UNION will return just one row, UNION ALL will return the same row twice. – Magnus Hagander Sep 28 '09 at 8:16
  • @Magnus Hagander: I'm not sure it will be any faster when there is at most 2 rows. Granted, I would normally make the distinction between UNION and UNION ALL. – Mitch Wheat Sep 28 '09 at 8:54
  • Running the query as it is here gives me syntax error near UNION, possibly because there must be just one limit and order by's. I solved it wrapping the queries with parenthesis, like (SELECT ... LIMIT 1) UNION ALL (SELECT ... LIMIT 1) – Fermin Silva Jun 27 '16 at 13:08

You might want to try this, could potentially be faster than doing two queries:

select <some columns>
from (
    SELECT <some columns>,
           row_number() over (order by date desc) as rn,
           count(*) over () as total_count
    FROM mytable
    <maybe some joins here>
    WHERE <various conditions>
) t
where rn = 1
   or rn = total_count
ORDER BY date DESC
  • Interesting. I didn't realize that. Just tested it and it's, of course, all true. Thanks for the insight. – DrFriedParts Mar 12 '16 at 9:19

First record:

SELECT <some columns> FROM mytable
<maybe some joins here>
WHERE <various conditions>
ORDER BY date ASC
LIMIT 1

Last record:

SELECT <some columns> FROM mytable
<maybe some joins here>
WHERE <various conditions>
ORDER BY date DESC
LIMIT 1
  • The UNION ALL method mentioned in the other comment will definitely be faster than issuing two queries. – Magnus Hagander Sep 28 '09 at 8:16

last record :

SELECT * FROM `aboutus` order by id desc limit 1

first record :

SELECT * FROM `aboutus` order by id asc limit 1
  • 1
    That is invalid SQL for PostgreSQL (it uses standard double quotes " for quoting object names - and they aren't needed at all here anyway) – a_horse_with_no_name Sep 3 '12 at 6:32
  • Works, thanks! Anybody know how efficient this is though? – Souleiman Apr 20 '13 at 21:50
  • @souleiman Each query is as fast as it can be. The query planner will use the appropriate index and return as fast as possible O(log(N))... however doing this in 2 separate queries will be slower and/or less efficient than one query if you always want both the first and last record as the OP indicated. Just use UNION ALL (faster) between the 2 queries (or UNION if you don't want duplicates). – DrFriedParts Mar 12 '16 at 5:16
SELECT * FROM TABLE_NAME WHERE ROWID=(SELECT MIN(ROWID) FROM TABLE_NAME) 
UNION
SELECT * FROM TABLE_NAME WHERE ROWID=(SELECT MAX(ROWID) FROM TABLE_NAME)

or

SELECT * FROM TABLE_NAME WHERE ROWID=(SELECT MIN(ROWID) FROM TABLE_NAME) 
                            OR ROWID=(SELECT MAX(ROWID) FROM TABLE_NAME)
  • 8
    PostgreSQL does not have a rowid, it's called ctid there (and neither Oracle's rowid nor PostgreSQL's ctid guarantee any ordering) – a_horse_with_no_name Aug 26 '12 at 21:13
  • 5
    Why not make this simpler: SELECT * FROM TABLE_NAME WHERE rowid=(SELECT MIN(rowid) FROM TABLE_NAME) OR rowid=(SELECT MAX(rowid) FROM TABLE_NAME) – Matt Kneiser Oct 11 '12 at 13:53

In all the exposed ways of do until now, must go through scan two times, one for the first row and one for the last row.

Using the Window Function "ROW_NUMBER() OVER (...)" plus "WITH Queries", you can scan only one time and get both items.

Window Function: https://www.postgresql.org/docs/9.6/static/functions-window.html

WITH Queries: https://www.postgresql.org/docs/9.6/static/queries-with.html

Example:

WITH scan_plan AS (
SELECT
    <some columns>,
    ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY date DESC) AS first_row, /*It's logical required to be the same as major query*/
    ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY date ASC) AS last_row /*It's rigth, needs to be the inverse*/
FROM mytable
<maybe some joins here>
WHERE <various conditions>
ORDER BY date DESC)

SELECT
    <some columns>
FROM scan_plan
WHERE scan_plan.first_row = 1 OR scan_plan.last_row = 1;

On that way you will do relations, filtrations and data manipulation only one time.

Try some EXPLAIN ANALYZE on both ways.

select *
from {Table_Name}
where {x_column_name}=(
    select d.{x_column_name} 
    from (
        select rownum as rno,{x_column_name}
        from {Table_Name})d
        where d.rno=(
            select count(*)
            from {Table_Name}));
SELECT 
    MIN(Column), MAX(Column), UserId 
FROM 
    Table_Name
WHERE 
    (Conditions)
GROUP BY 
    UserId DESC

or

SELECT        
    MAX(Column) 
FROM            
    TableName
WHERE        
    (Filter)

UNION ALL

SELECT        
    MIN(Column)
FROM            
    TableName AS Tablename1
WHERE        
    (Filter)
ORDER BY 
    Column
-- Create a function that always returns the first non-NULL item
CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION public.first_agg ( anyelement, anyelement )
RETURNS anyelement LANGUAGE SQL IMMUTABLE STRICT AS $$
        SELECT $1;
$$;


-- And then wrap an aggregate around it
CREATE AGGREGATE public.FIRST (
        sfunc    = public.first_agg,
        basetype = anyelement,
        stype    = anyelement
);

-- Create a function that always returns the last non-NULL item
CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION public.last_agg ( anyelement, anyelement )
RETURNS anyelement LANGUAGE SQL IMMUTABLE STRICT AS $$
        SELECT $2;
$$;

-- And then wrap an aggregate around it
CREATE AGGREGATE public.LAST (
        sfunc    = public.last_agg,
        basetype = anyelement,
        stype    = anyelement
);

Got it from here: https://wiki.postgresql.org/wiki/First/last_(aggregate)

Why not use order by asc limit 1 and the reverse, order by desc limit 1?

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