95

In PostgreSQL I run a query on it with several conditions that returns multiple rows, ordered by one of the columns. Example:

SELECT <some columns> 
FROM mytable
<maybe some joins here>
WHERE <various conditions>
ORDER BY date DESC

How would one get the first and the last row from this query?

3

15 Answers 15

143

[Caveat: Might not be the most efficient way to do it]:

(SELECT <some columns>
FROM mytable
<maybe some joins here>
WHERE <various conditions>
ORDER BY date DESC
LIMIT 1)

UNION ALL

(SELECT <some columns>
FROM mytable
<maybe some joins here>
WHERE <various conditions>
ORDER BY date ASC    
LIMIT 1)
5
  • 11
    I think the 'Top' keyword is for SQL server only, MySQL/Postgre uses 'Limit'
    – Robo
    Sep 28, 2009 at 4:28
  • 2
    Using UNION ALL will make this marginally faster, as it removes a check for duplicates. It'll differ in how it works if the first and last row are the same of course - UNION will return just one row, UNION ALL will return the same row twice. Sep 28, 2009 at 8:16
  • @Magnus Hagander: I'm not sure it will be any faster when there is at most 2 rows. Granted, I would normally make the distinction between UNION and UNION ALL. Sep 28, 2009 at 8:54
  • Running the query as it is here gives me syntax error near UNION, possibly because there must be just one limit and order by's. I solved it wrapping the queries with parenthesis, like (SELECT ... LIMIT 1) UNION ALL (SELECT ... LIMIT 1) Jun 27, 2016 at 13:08
  • Can anyone explain why this may not be efficient?
    – Joseph K.
    Aug 4, 2020 at 15:14
42

You might want to try this, could potentially be faster than doing two queries:

select <some columns>
from (
    SELECT <some columns>,
           row_number() over (order by date desc) as rn,
           count(*) over () as total_count
    FROM mytable
    <maybe some joins here>
    WHERE <various conditions>
) t
where rn = 1
   or rn = total_count
ORDER BY date DESC
0
25

First record:

SELECT <some columns> FROM mytable
<maybe some joins here>
WHERE <various conditions>
ORDER BY date ASC
LIMIT 1

Last record:

SELECT <some columns> FROM mytable
<maybe some joins here>
WHERE <various conditions>
ORDER BY date DESC
LIMIT 1
1
  • 1
    The UNION ALL method mentioned in the other comment will definitely be faster than issuing two queries. Sep 28, 2009 at 8:16
19

last record :

SELECT * FROM `aboutus` order by id desc limit 1

first record :

SELECT * FROM `aboutus` order by id asc limit 1
2
  • 2
    That is invalid SQL for PostgreSQL (it uses standard double quotes " for quoting object names - and they aren't needed at all here anyway) Sep 3, 2012 at 6:32
  • @souleiman Each query is as fast as it can be. The query planner will use the appropriate index and return as fast as possible O(log(N))... however doing this in 2 separate queries will be slower and/or less efficient than one query if you always want both the first and last record as the OP indicated. Just use UNION ALL (faster) between the 2 queries (or UNION if you don't want duplicates). Mar 12, 2016 at 5:16
13

In all the exposed ways of do until now, must go through scan two times, one for the first row and one for the last row.

Using the Window Function "ROW_NUMBER() OVER (...)" plus "WITH Queries", you can scan only one time and get both items.

Window Function: https://www.postgresql.org/docs/9.6/static/functions-window.html

WITH Queries: https://www.postgresql.org/docs/9.6/static/queries-with.html

Example:

WITH scan_plan AS (
SELECT
    <some columns>,
    ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY date DESC) AS first_row, /*It's logical required to be the same as major query*/
    ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY date ASC) AS last_row /*It's rigth, needs to be the inverse*/
FROM mytable
<maybe some joins here>
WHERE <various conditions>
ORDER BY date DESC)

SELECT
    <some columns>
FROM scan_plan
WHERE scan_plan.first_row = 1 OR scan_plan.last_row = 1;

On that way you will do relations, filtrations and data manipulation only one time.

Try some EXPLAIN ANALYZE on both ways.

2
  • thanks for also giving the references to the key concepts Mar 22, 2019 at 22:58
  • the count(*) over () as total_count above is a little bit more performant, because it uses just one WindowAgg and the dataset is sorted only once as well.
    – ruloweb
    Aug 26, 2019 at 3:39
7
SELECT <rows> FROM TABLE_NAME WHERE ROWID=(SELECT MIN(ROWID) FROM TABLE_NAME) 
UNION
SELECT <rows> FROM TABLE_NAME WHERE ROWID=(SELECT MAX(ROWID) FROM TABLE_NAME)

or

SELECT * FROM TABLE_NAME WHERE ROWID=(SELECT MIN(ROWID) FROM TABLE_NAME) 
                            OR ROWID=(SELECT MAX(ROWID) FROM TABLE_NAME)
2
  • 9
    PostgreSQL does not have a rowid, it's called ctid there (and neither Oracle's rowid nor PostgreSQL's ctid guarantee any ordering) Aug 26, 2012 at 21:13
  • 5
    Why not make this simpler: SELECT * FROM TABLE_NAME WHERE rowid=(SELECT MIN(rowid) FROM TABLE_NAME) OR rowid=(SELECT MAX(rowid) FROM TABLE_NAME) Oct 11, 2012 at 13:53
5

I know this is a 7 year old thread, but the question was nearly identical and the accepted answer was what I started this with and eventually optimized to the following, which in my case returns consistently 85ms +-5ms with <some_column> being an indexed int field.

note1: the UNION ALL example in the accepted answer works too but was less performant in my case coming in at 300ms +-20ms.

note2: the next most upvoted answer (the row counter example) also works but was the least performant in my case coming in at 800ms +-70ms.

select
  (select <some_column> from <some_table>
    order by <some_field> limit 1)        as oldest,
  (select <some_column> from <some_table> 
    order by <some_field> desc limit 1)   as newest
;

I did note that op referenced possible joins. I haven't had the need to include joins for my own purposes (just getting the current low and high IDs in fairly dynamic view) but with this model, the subqueries for oldest and newest should be able to be full fledged queries. Haven't tested, so not sure if it would work or be optimal.

I did test this model (which may also have already been suggested above) which might be a bit easier to join against, but the performance as-is was just a bit less than half of the example above, consistently returning 220ms +-10ms in my case.

select oldest.<some_field> as old, 
       newest.<some_field> as new  
from
  (select <some_column> from <some_table>
    order by <some_field> limit 1)        as oldest,
  (select <some_column> from <some_table> 
    order by <some_field> desc limit 1)   as newest
;
1
  • 1
    So which of the two code snippets was the one that was the 85ms? May 27, 2021 at 15:28
2

In some cases useful the WINDOW functions FIRST_VALUE() and LAST_VALUE(). The key benefit - this query is readeable, sort data only once and it is only one query for several columns.

 SELECT
    FIRST_VALUE(timestamp) over w as created_dt,
    LAST_VALUE(timestamp) over w as last_update_dt,
    LAST_VALUE(action) over w as last_action
FROM events
WINDOW w as (ORDER BY timestamp ASC)

It can be used for getting fisrt and last rows by some ID

SELECT DISTINCT
    order_id,
    FIRST_VALUE(timestamp) over w as created_dt,
    LAST_VALUE(timestamp) over w as last_update_dt,
    LAST_VALUE(action) over w as last_action
    
FROM events as x
WINDOW w as (PARTITION BY order_id ORDER BY timestamp ASC)
2
  • 2
    To avoid duplicating window functions, you can use WINDOW clause for each windowing behavior and then reference it in OVER: WINDOW w as (PARTITION BY order_id ORDER BY timestamp ASC)
    – Rsh
    Mar 22, 2021 at 5:38
  • I'm not sure this actually does quite what you think it does. In SQL Server, if you have a table with columns timestamp and action, your first query generates one row for every row in events. On the first row, created_dt is the first timestamp as expected, but last_update_dt is always equal to created_dt. That is, it's the last value seen to that point in the data retrieval. Perhaps PostGreSQL is different
    – Auspex
    Jan 20 at 16:42
1
select *
from {Table_Name}
where {x_column_name}=(
    select d.{x_column_name} 
    from (
        select rownum as rno,{x_column_name}
        from {Table_Name})d
        where d.rno=(
            select count(*)
            from {Table_Name}));
1
-- Create a function that always returns the first non-NULL item
CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION public.first_agg ( anyelement, anyelement )
RETURNS anyelement LANGUAGE SQL IMMUTABLE STRICT AS $$
        SELECT $1;
$$;


-- And then wrap an aggregate around it
CREATE AGGREGATE public.FIRST (
        sfunc    = public.first_agg,
        basetype = anyelement,
        stype    = anyelement
);

-- Create a function that always returns the last non-NULL item
CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION public.last_agg ( anyelement, anyelement )
RETURNS anyelement LANGUAGE SQL IMMUTABLE STRICT AS $$
        SELECT $2;
$$;

-- And then wrap an aggregate around it
CREATE AGGREGATE public.LAST (
        sfunc    = public.last_agg,
        basetype = anyelement,
        stype    = anyelement
);

Got it from here: https://wiki.postgresql.org/wiki/First/last_(aggregate)

0
SELECT 
    MIN(Column), MAX(Column), UserId 
FROM 
    Table_Name
WHERE 
    (Conditions)
GROUP BY 
    UserId DESC

or

SELECT        
    MAX(Column) 
FROM            
    TableName
WHERE        
    (Filter)

UNION ALL

SELECT        
    MIN(Column)
FROM            
    TableName AS Tablename1
WHERE        
    (Filter)
ORDER BY 
    Column
0

Why not use order by asc limit 1 and the reverse, order by desc limit 1?

0
0

How to get the First and Last Record of DB in c#.

SELECT TOP 1 * 
  FROM ViewAttendenceReport 
 WHERE EmployeeId = 4 
   AND AttendenceDate >='1/18/2020 00:00:00' 
   AND AttendenceDate <='1/18/2020 23:59:59'
 ORDER BY Intime ASC
 UNION
SELECT TOP 1 * 
  FROM ViewAttendenceReport 
 WHERE EmployeeId = 4 
   AND AttendenceDate >='1/18/2020 00:00:00' 
   AND AttendenceDate <='1/18/2020 23:59:59' 
 ORDER BY OutTime DESC; 
0

I think this code gets the same and is easier to read.

SELECT <some columns> 
FROM mytable
<maybe some joins here>
WHERE date >= (SELECT date from mytable)
OR date <= (SELECT date from mytable);
1
  • 2
    While this code may answer the question, providing additional context regarding why and/or how this code answers the question improves its long-term value.
    – Igor F.
    Mar 11, 2020 at 9:21
0

The correct Sql listed below

SELECT * FROM (SELECT city, length(city) FROM station WHERE LENGTH(city)=(SELECT MIN(LENGTH(city)) FROM station) ORDER BY city ) LIMIT 1;

SELECT * FROM (SELECT city, length(city) FROM station WHERE LENGTH(city)=(SELECT MAX(LENGTH(city)) FROM station) ORDER BY city ) LIMIT 1; 

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