1

I have a the following code:

__global__ void interpolation(const double2* __restrict__ data, double2* __restrict__ result, const double* __restrict__ x, const double* __restrict__ y, const int N1, const int N2, int M)
{
    int i = threadIdx.x + blockDim.x * blockIdx.x;

    [...]        

    double phi_cap1, phi_cap2;

    if(i<M) {   

         for(int m=0; m<(2*K+1); m++) {

              [calculate phi_cap1];

              for(int n=0; n<(2*K+1); n++) {

                 [calculate phi_cap2];

                 [calculate phi_cap=phi_cap1*phi_cap2];

                 [use phi_cap];

             }
    }

}

}

I would like to use Dynamic Programming on a Kepler K20 card to dispatch the processing of phi_cap1 and phi_cap2 in parallel to a bunch of threads to reduce the computation time. K=6 in my code, so I'm launching a single block of 13x13 threads.

Following the CUDA Dynamic Parallelism Programming Guide, I'm allocating a matrix phi_cap of 169 elements (formed by the products of phi_cap1 and phi_cap2), needed to exchange the data with the child kernel, in global memory. Indeed, quoting the guide,

As a general rule, all storage passed to a child kernel should be allocated explicitly from the global-memory heap.

I then ended-up with the following code

__global__ void interpolation(const double2* __restrict__ data, double2* __restrict__ result, const double* __restrict__ x, const double* __restrict__ y, const int N1, const int N2, int M)
{
    int i = threadIdx.x + blockDim.x * blockIdx.x;

    [...]   

    dim3 dimBlock(2*K+1,2*K+1); dim3 dimGrid(1,1);

    if(i<M) {   

    double* phi_cap; cudaMalloc((void**)&phi_cap,sizeof(double)*(2*K+1)*(2*K+1));

    child_kernel<<<dimGrid,dimBlock>>>(cc_diff1,cc_diff2,phi_cap);

    for(int m=0; m<(2*K+1); m++) {

        for(int n=0; n<(2*K+1); n++) {

                        [use phi_cap];

        }
    }

}

}

The problem is that the first routine takes 5ms to run, while the second routine, even by commenting the child_kernel launch, takes 23ms, with practically all the time spent in the cudaMalloc API.

Since in dynamic programming one would often need allocating memory space to exchange data with the child kernels, and the only solution seems to be global memory taking so much time, it seems to me that one serious bottleneck of the usefulness of dynamic programming is the data exchange, unless there is a way to circumvent the global memory allocation issue.

The question then is: is there any workaround to the mentioned issue, namely, taking so much time when allocating global memory from within a kernel?. Thanks

SOLUTION PROPOSED IN THE COMMENTS

Allocate the required global memory from outside the parent kernel. I have verified that allocating the required global memory from outside the parent kernel is much faster.

  • The question is pretty clear: anybody knows any workaround to this bottlneck? Please, carefully read the last sentence of the post. – JackOLantern Feb 13 '13 at 14:10
  • @JackOLantern: When you post code, try to keep in mind that others have to read it in a roughly 100 column wide scroll box. The code is very difficult to read. – talonmies Feb 13 '13 at 14:17
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    @JackOLantern When posting kernel code it is helpful to always specify expected values (or ranges) for the gridDim, blockDim and any constant. In your code you are calling cudaMalloc per thread. It may be significantly faster to call this per block or to allocate the memory before the host launch. – Greg Smith Feb 13 '13 at 16:37
  • 1
    @JackOLantern You are calling cudaMalloc from each thread where i < M which means that you are making M cudaMalloc calls. The bigger M is the worse it is going to get. Instead you could make a single cudaMalloc call from the first thread allocating M times the size that you used before (actually in your case you should allocate more, so each block is properly aligned). After that sync the threads and you can start your child kernels with correctly computed phi_cap address for each child kernel. – RoBiK Feb 13 '13 at 16:59
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    @JackOLantern Why bother with allocating memory from inside the kernel each time when you can allocate it once outside of the kernel and reuse it? That would be a lot quicker. If M is varies between kernel calls you could allocate as much as you would need for the biggest M. – RoBiK Feb 13 '13 at 16:59
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You are calling cudaMalloc from each thread where i < M which means that you are making M cudaMalloc calls.

The bigger M is the worse it is going to get.

Instead you could make a single cudaMalloc call from the first thread of the block allocating M times the size that you used before (actually in your case you should allocate more, so each block is properly aligned). After that sync the threads and you can start your child kernels with correctly computed phi_cap address for each child kernel.

Alternatively (if your specific situation allows you to allocate enough memory that you can hold on to between the kernel calls) you could allocate the memory once outside of the kernel and reuse it. That would be a lot quicker. If M varies between kernel calls you could allocate as much as you would need for the biggest M.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thank you for your answer. Just a comment. The first solution could be convenient in problems with varying computational load, for example, when the amount of the global memory to be allocated is not known to the host side, but is calculated on the device side. For my particular problem, I would choose the second possibility. – JackOLantern Feb 15 '13 at 13:35

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