11

I am trying to make the difference of two rows in an mysql database.
I have this table containing ID, kilometers, date, car_id, car_driver etc...
Since I don't always enter the information in the table in the correct order, I may end up with information like this:

ID | Kilometers | date | car_id | car_driver | ...
 1 | 100        | 2012-05-04 | 1 | 1  
 2 | 200        | 2012-05-08 | 1 | 1
 3 | 1000       | 2012-05-25 | 1 | 1 
 4 | 600        | 2012-05-16 | 1 | 1

With a select statement I am able to sort my table correctly:

SELECT * FROM mytable ORDER BY car_driver ASC, car_id ASC, date ASC

I will obtain this:

ID | Kilometers | date  | car_id | car_driver | ...  
 1 | 100        | 2012-05-04 | 1 | 1  
 2 | 200        | 2012-05-08 | 1 | 1
 4 | 600        | 2012-05-16 | 1 | 1  
 3 | 1000       | 2012-05-25 | 1 | 1

Now I would like to make a view where basically I have this extra information: Number of kilometers since last date and I would like to obtain something like this:

ID | Kilometers | date       | car_id | car_driver | number_km_since_last_date   
 1 | 100        | 2012-05-04 | 1 | 1 | 0  
 2 | 200        | 2012-05-08 | 1 | 1 | 100  
 4 | 600        | 2012-05-16 | 1 | 1 | 400  
 3 | 1000       | 2012-05-25 | 1 | 1 | 400

I thought of doing an INNER JOIN to perform what I wanted, but I have the feeling I can't do the join on my ID since they are not sorted correctly.
Is there a way to achieve what I want?

Shall I create a view with a sort of row_number that I can then used in my INNER JOIN?

  • THis is really hard to read. Can you please re-format with proper code sections? – OldProgrammer Feb 13 '13 at 15:38
  • Is there a reason that this has be done exclusively with MySQL? – Explosion Pills Feb 13 '13 at 15:40
  • what if 2 with same date? – Imre L Feb 13 '13 at 15:41
  • 1
    Would be so easy with a modern DBMS supporting window functions and lag() – a_horse_with_no_name Feb 13 '13 at 15:50
  • 1
    Do you want the kilometers difference to start from 0 again for every car_id or for every car_driver? Because that's a slightly different question which (could be solved easily with PARTITION BY in other DBMS but) would make MySQL solutions even more complex. – ypercubeᵀᴹ Feb 13 '13 at 16:37
23
SELECT
    mt1.ID,
    mt1.Kilometers,
    mt1.date,
    mt1.Kilometers - IFNULL(mt2.Kilometers, 0) AS number_km_since_last_date   
FROM
    myTable mt1
    LEFT JOIN myTable mt2
        ON mt2.Date = (
            SELECT MAX(Date)
            FROM myTable mt3
            WHERE mt3.Date < mt1.Date
        )
ORDER BY mt1.date

Sql Fiddle

Or, by emulating a lag() function through MySql hackiness...

SET @kilo=0;

SELECT
    mt1.ID,
    mt1.Kilometers - @kilo AS number_km_since_last_date,
    @kilo := mt1.Kilometers Kilometers,
    mt1.date
FROM myTable mt1
ORDER BY mt1.date

Sql Fiddle

  • Thanks you actually answered my question, however I should have maybe ask it in a more complete way. Actually my Select statement is not done only on date, but on other criteria like: car_id, car_driver etc... so I have more than I column in my ORDER BY. – user1108276 Feb 13 '13 at 15:55
  • 2
    @user1108276 If you update your question with the additional details / criteria, I can provide you a better answer... – Michael Fredrickson Feb 13 '13 at 16:00
  • Any other idea Mickael? That would be very helpful – user1108276 Feb 14 '13 at 10:11
  • I think we don't need the 3rd table, ``` LEFT JOIN myTable mt2 ON mt2.Date = ( SELECT MAX(Date) FROM myTable mt2 WHERE mt2.Date < mt1.Date ) ``` – yusong Oct 23 '19 at 6:56
3

In Postgres, Oracle and SQL-Server 2012, this is plain simple, using the LAG() function:

SELECT
    id, kilometers, date,
    kilometers 
    - COALESCE( LAG(kilometers) OVER (ORDER BY date ASC, car_driver ASC, id ASC)
              , kilometers) 
        AS number_km_since_last_date
FROM
    mytable ;

In MySQL, we have to do some nasty constructions. Either an inline subquery (with probably not very good performance):

SELECT
    id, kilometers, date,
    kilometers - COALESCE(
            ( SELECT p.kilometers
              FROM mytable AS p
              WHERE ( p.date = m.date AND p.car_driver = m.car_driver
                                                     AND p.id < m.id
                   OR p.date = m.date AND p.car_driver < m.car_driver
                   OR p.date < m.date
                    )
              ORDER BY p.date DESC, p.car_driver DESC
                  LIMIT 1
            ), kilometers) 
        AS number_km_since_last_date
FROM
    mytable AS m ;

or a self-join (already provided by @Michael Fredrickson) or using MySQL variables (already provided as well).


If you want the counter to start again from 0 for every car_id, which would be done with PARTITION BY in many other DBMS:

SELECT
    id, kilometers, date,
    kilometers 
    - COALESCE( LAG(kilometers) OVER (PARTITION BY car_id 
                                      ORDER BY date ASC, car_driver ASC, id ASC)
              , kilometers) 
        AS number_km_since_last_date
FROM
    mytable ;

it could be done in MySQL like this:

SELECT
    id, kilometers, date,
    kilometers - COALESCE(
            ( SELECT p.kilometers
              FROM mytable AS p
              WHERE p.car_id = m.car_id
                AND ( p.date = m.date AND p.car_driver = m.car_driver
                                                     AND p.id < m.id
                   OR p.date = m.date AND p.car_driver < m.car_driver 
                   OR p.date < m.date
                    )
              ORDER BY p.date DESC, p.car_driver DESC
                  LIMIT 1
            ), kilometers) 
        AS number_km_since_last_date
FROM
    mytable AS m ;
  • @MichaelMcGowan Yeah, I was writing how it could be done in MySQL, but Michael was faster. – ypercubeᵀᴹ Feb 13 '13 at 15:55
  • explainextended.com/2009/03/10/… shows a generic solution to getting lag() in MySQL – TML Feb 13 '13 at 15:55
  • Thing is that I can have twice the same date. Hence why my ORDER BY is done on other criteria that just the date: car_id, car_driver, km etc... – user1108276 Feb 13 '13 at 16:11
  • Then you can change the ORDER BY p.date DESC part with what you need. – ypercubeᵀᴹ Feb 13 '13 at 16:12
  • But how does it go to the next record? I see that you have WHERE p.date < m.date in my case dates may not be sorted correcty and you can have two entries on the same day... – user1108276 Feb 14 '13 at 10:11
0

With data unsorted I can only think of inline subquery (not a good idea on the large table):

select t1.*,
t1.Kilometers - (select top 1 kilometers from mytable t2 where t2.date < t1.date order by t2.date desc) as number_km_since_last_date
from mytable t1

If you get data sorted you can use left join

select t1.*
t1.Kilometers - t2.Kilometers as number_km_since_last_date
from mytable t1
left join mytable t2
  on t1.id = t2.id + 1

You can probably tell that I'm more of a TSQL guy so you might need to adjust syntax for MySQL.

0

Here's an example of using CURSOR for this use case as well

CREATE TABLE TEMP1
(
    MyDate DATETIME,
    MyQty INT
)

INSERT INTO TEMP1 VALUES ('01/08/17', 100)
INSERT INTO TEMP1 VALUES ('01/09/17', 120)
INSERT INTO TEMP1 VALUES ('01/10/17', 180)

DECLARE @LastDate DATETIME = NULL
DECLARE @LastQty INT = NULL
DECLARE @MyDate DATETIME = NULL
DECLARE @MyQty INT = NULL

DECLARE mycursor CURSOR FOR
SELECT MyDate, MyQty FROM TEMP1 ORDER BY MyDate
OPEN mycursor
FETCH NEXT FROM mycursor INTO @MyDate, @MyQty

WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0  
BEGIN  

    SELECT @MyDate, @MyQty - @LastQty

    SET @LastDate = @MyDate
    SET @LastQty = @MyQty

FETCH NEXT FROM mycursor INTO @MyDate, @MyQty
END

CLOSE mycursor
DEALLOCATE mycursor

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