50

I understand that the difference between the printf, fprintf, sprintf etc functions and the vprintf, vfprintf, vsprintf etc functions has to do with how they deal with the function arguments. But how specifically? Is there really any reason to use one over the other? Should I just always use printf as that is a more common thing to see in C, or is there a legitimate reason to pick vprintf instead?

  • I recommend adding the tags "printf" and "variadic-functions" to your question. – Gabriel Staples Jul 25 '18 at 19:10
70

printf() and friends are for normal use. vprintf() and friends are for when you want to write your own printf()-like function. Say you want to write a function to print errors:

int error(char *fmt, ...)
{
    int result;
    va_list args;
    va_start(args, fmt);
    // what here?
    va_end(args);
    return result;
}

You'll notice that you can't pass args to printf(), since printf() takes many arguments, rather than one va_list argument. The vprintf() functions, however, do take a va_list argument instead of a variable number of arguments, so here is the completed version:

int error(char *fmt, ...)
{
    int result;
    va_list args;
    va_start(args, fmt);
    fputs("Error: ", stderr);
    result = vfprintf(stderr, fmt, args);
    va_end(args);
    return result;
}
  • 2
    Of course, then you want a warn() function that works like error() but prints "Warning: " instead, so you create your own vprintf() style function: int verror(char *prefix, char *fmt, va_list args); and have error() call that with "Error: " and warn() call it with "Warning: " but it's all semantics. – Chris Lutz Sep 28 '09 at 7:20
  • 2
    time to learn about variadic functions! This answer cleared things up, thank you. – Carson Myers Sep 28 '09 at 7:43
  • Note: the 'v' stands for "variadic". Knowing that is useful to help me remember what the vprintf functions even are, since reminding myself what the 'v' stands for also reminds me what these functions are for. More on "variadic" here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Variadic_function. – Gabriel Staples Jan 12 at 6:53
15

You never want to use vprintf() directly, but it's incredibly handy when you need to e.g. wrap printf(). For these cases, you will define the top-level function with variable arguments (...). Then you'll collect those into a va_list, do your processing, and finally call vprintf() on the va_list to get the printout happening.

0

The main difficulty with variadic arguments is not that there is a variable number of arguments but that there is no name associated with each argument. The va_start, va_arg macros parse the arguments in memory (in most C compilers they are on the stack) using the type information contained in the format string cf. Kernighan and Ritchie, second edition, section 7.3.

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