5

I am trying to use the Timer to trigger an event to send data across the network. I created a simple class to debug. Basically I have a List<string> I'd like to send. I want the following to happen:

  1. Add string to List
  2. Start Timer for 10 seconds
  3. Add second string to List before Timer.Elapsed
  4. Restart Timer back at 10 seconds.

So far I have this:

public static List<string> list;
public static Timer timer;
public static bool isWiredUp = false;

public static void Log(string value) {
    if (list == null) list = new List<string>();
    list.Add(value);

    //this does not reset the timer, elapsed still happens 10s after #1
    if (timer != null) {
        timer = null;
    }

    timer = new Timer(10000);
    timer.Start();
    timer.Enabled = true;
    timer.AutoReset = false;

    if (!isWiredUp) {
        timer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(SendToServer);
        isWiredUp = true;
    }
}

static void SendToServer(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e) {
    timer.Enabled = false;
    timer.Stop();
}

Any ideas?

11

You can use the Stop function followed immediately by the Start function to "restart" the timer. Using that you can create the Timer when the class is first created, wire up the Elapsed event at that time, and then do nothing but call those two methods when an item is added. It will either start, or restart, the timer. Note that calling Stop on a timer that hasn't yet been started just does nothing, it doesn't throw an exception or cause any other problems.

public class Foo
{
    public static List<string> list;
    public static Timer timer;
    static Foo()
    {
        list = new List<string>();
        timer = new Timer(10000);
        timer.Enabled = true;
        timer.AutoReset = false;
        timer.Elapsed += SendToServer;
    }

    public static void Log(string value)
    {
        list.Add(value);
        timer.Stop();
        timer.Start();
    }

    static void SendToServer(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        //TODO send data to server

        //AutoReset is false, so neither of these are needed
        //timer.Enabled = false;
        //timer.Stop();
    }
}

Note that rather than using a List it's very possible that you want to use a BlockingCollection<string> instead. This has several advantages. First, the Log methods will work if called at the same time from multiple threads; as is multiple concurrent logs could break the list. It also means that SendToServer can be taking items out of the queue at the same time that new items are added. If you use a List you'll need to lock all access to the list (which might not be a problem, but isn't as straightforward).

  • From the question I understand that he wants to accumulate data in the list and send them once only after 10 seconds since last addition to list has elapsed. He wants to avoid SendToServer being called twice if he adds data to the list two times three seconds apart. I could be wrong, but that's how I read it. – Andrew Savinykh Feb 13 '13 at 19:17
  • @zespri That's exactly how I read it to. That is exactly what this code does. – Servy Feb 13 '13 at 19:20
  • even using a timer.. this is a bad idea.. There is no locking, no form of synchronization.. A timer is the absolute worst way to go about doing this, he should reconsider how he is solving this problem. – Matthew Sanford Feb 13 '13 at 19:21
  • The only problem is when the Start() function is called a second time, it doesn't delay the Elapsed event. – tedski Feb 13 '13 at 19:25
  • @MatthewSanford The synchronization needs to be done in addition to use a Timer, and is an entirely separate issue from the question at hand. Yes, he needs to address that issue, but that's not what the question is asking about. – Servy Feb 13 '13 at 19:27
0

This kind of thing is very easy to achieve with IObservable (Rx).

Let us simplify matters by declaring a Subject<string> as your list to push onto using .OnNext. Once you have your subject, an observable, you can do what you want with a single 'line' of System.Reactive.Linq. This is illustrated in the following pseudo-c#

 subject
.Buffer(<your timespan>,1)   //buffer until either a value is added or the timeout expires
.Subscribe(x => 
   { 
      if (x.Count == 0)  //the timeout expired so send on
      {
         SendAccumulatedListToServer(<your list>);   
         <clear your list>
      }   
      else
      {
         <your list>.Add(x);
      }
   });
-4

What you are implementing is totally the wrong way to go about doing this. Have a look at the consumer producer model:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh228601.aspx

What you are trying to do is very commonly called the Consumer/Producer dataflow model. Essentially you have something generating a list of data that is to be sent somewhere, rather than sending it each time an item is added to the list you would like to send them in groups.. So you have a producer (the code putting data to be sent) and a consumer (the code sending the data).

Generally this problem is solved by spawning a thread that watches the list (usually a queue) and sends the data at regulary intervals, the best way to do this is using an EventWaitHandle.

Here is some very simplified code as an example

    class ServerStuff
{
    public void Init()
    {
        datatosend = new List<string>();
                    exitrequest = new EventWaitHandle(false, EventResetMode.ManualReset); //This wait handle will signal the consumer thread to exit
        Thread t = new Thread(new ThreadStart(_RunThread));
        t.Start(); // Start the consumer thread...
    }

    public void Stop()
    {
        exitrequest.Set();
    }

    List<string> datatosend;
    EventWaitHandle exitrequest;

    public void AddItem(string item)
    {
        lock (((ICollection)datatosend).SyncRoot)
            datatosend.Add(item);
    }

    private void RunThread()
    {
        while (exitrequest.WaitOne(10 * 1000)) //wait 10 seconds between sending data, or wake up immediatly to exit request
        {
            string[] tosend;
            lock (((ICollection)datatosend).SyncRoot)
            {
                tosend = datatosend.ToArray();
                datatosend.Clear();
            }

            //Send the data to Sever here...

        }
    }
}
  • Your link shows "This topic is obsolete." and does not contain useful information. – Andrew Savinykh Feb 13 '13 at 19:14
  • I have no idea what you are talking about or what that page is supposed to be telling me – tedski Feb 13 '13 at 19:26
  • ok I will edit and explain more... – Matthew Sanford Feb 13 '13 at 19:27
  • 1
    1. If you don't reset it, and have AutoReset=true, the same thing. When it's not set to auto reset and is reset when an item is added, something quite different. 2. Then add it so that your code does what the question asks. 3. No, it's not. If you want proof, read your own link, it recommends a very different approach. 4. No, it's not the best use of resources, it burns a dedicated thread needlessly. Perhaps you should read your own link. It seems you're thinking about the first link you posted now marked "obsolete". That should give you a hint. How is using a timer a mistake? – Servy Feb 13 '13 at 19:57
  • 2
    I find it kinda funny that you downvote my answer, despite the fact that it works, because I downvoted your answer because it doesn't work. – Servy Feb 13 '13 at 19:59

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