100

I have to make a program using Euler's method for the "ball in a spring" model

from pylab import*
from math import*
m=0.1
Lo=1
tt=30
k=200
t=20
g=9.81
dt=0.01
n=int((ceil(t/dt)))
km=k/m
r0=[-5,5*sqrt(3)]
v0=[-5,5*sqrt(3)]
a=zeros((n,2))
r=zeros((n,2))
v=zeros((n,2))
t=zeros((n,2))
r[1,:]=r0
v[1,:]=v0
for i in range(n-1):
    rr=dot(r[i,:],r[i,:])**0.5
    a=-g+km*cos(tt)*(rr-L0)*r[i,:]/rr
    v[i+1,:]=v[i,:]+a*dt
    r[i+1,:]=r[i,:]+v[i+1,:]*dt
    t[i+1]=t[i]+dt

    #print norm(r[i,:])

plot(r[:,0],r[:,1])
xlim(-100,100)
ylim(-100,100)
xlabel('x [m]')
ylabel('y [m]')

show()

I keep getting this error:

a=-g+km*cos(tt)*(rr-L0)*r[i,:]/rr
RuntimeWarning: invalid value encountered in divide

I can't figure it out, what is wrong with the code?

  • print what's going on in each of the smaller item in that line of code. That's the only way to debug it. – CppLearner Feb 13 '13 at 20:11
  • 2
    You have nans for rr, which is throwing that error. The issue with rr is stemming from r[i,:] which is equal, in some cases, to array([ nan, nan]). As @CppLearner mentioned, the best way to debug (or write) code is to test each smaller portion before implementing. – cosmosis Feb 13 '13 at 20:20
163

I think your code is trying to "divide by zero" or "divide by NaN". If you are aware of that and don't want it to bother you, then you can try:

import numpy as np
np.seterr(divide='ignore', invalid='ignore')

For more details see:

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  • 77
    It can be useful to use with NP.errstate(divide='ignore',invalid='ignore'): if you want to suppress the warnings for a block of code. – GWW Mar 16 '16 at 17:02
  • 8
    Why would one want to ignore a divide by zero or NaN? – x squared Nov 10 '17 at 14:38
  • 7
    @xsquared When you have correctly handled the value yourself, after the divide, and you are distributing your code to users (or are tired of seeing the warning). with np.errstate(...) lets you do this safely for just the handled case. – reve_etrange Mar 12 '18 at 3:39
  • 2
    @reve_etrange That I find much more acceptable than generally ignoring divides by zero. – x squared Mar 23 '18 at 12:17
  • 1
    it is better to set this before the line that causes the error then reset after the line to the normal state of 'warn' by the command np.seterr(divide='warn', invalid='warn') – Mohammad ElNesr Apr 14 '19 at 14:23
15

Python indexing starts at 0 (rather than 1), so your assignment "r[1,:] = r0" defines the second (i.e. index 1) element of r and leaves the first (index 0) element as a pair of zeros. The first value of i in your for loop is 0, so rr gets the square root of the dot product of the first entry in r with itself (which is 0), and the division by rr in the subsequent line throws the error.

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11

To prevent division by zero you could pre-initialize the output 'out' where the div0 error happens, eg np.where does not cut it since the complete line is evaluated regardless of condition.

example with pre-initialization:

a = np.arange(10).reshape(2,5)
a[1,3] = 0
print(a)    #[[0 1 2 3 4], [5 6 7 0 9]]
a[0]/a[1]   # errors at 3/0
out = np.ones( (5) )  #preinit
np.divide(a[0],a[1], out=out, where=a[1]!=0) #only divide nonzeros else 1
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4

You are dividing by rr which may be 0.0. Check if rr is zero and do something reasonable other than using it in the denominator.

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