1

I have two functions that each return the same list of objects. But, the one that uses TSQL is much faster than the one using Entity Framework and I do not understand why one would be faster than the other. Is it possible to modify my EF function to work as fast as the TSQL one?

Any help will be appreciated. My code is below:

TSQL:

    public static List<ChartHist> ListHistory_PureSQL()
    {
        List<DataRow> listDataRow = null;
        string srtQry = @"Select LoginHistoryID, 
                                   LoginDuration as LoginDuration_Pass, 
                                   0 as LoginDuration_Fail, 
                                   LoginDateTime, 
                                   LoginLocationID, 
                                   LoginUserEmailID, 
                                   LoginApplicationID, 
                                   LoginEnvironmentID, 
                                   ScriptFrequency, 
                                   LoginStatus, 
                                   Reason
                            From LoginHistory
                            Where LoginStatus = 'Pass'
                            UNION
                            Select LoginHistoryID, 
                                   0 as LoginDuration_Pass, 
                                   LoginDuration as LoginDuration_Fail, 
                                   LoginDateTime, 
                                   LoginLocationID, 
                                   LoginUserEmailID, 
                                   LoginApplicationID, 
                                   LoginEnvironmentID, 
                                   ScriptFrequency, 
                                   LoginStatus, 
                                   Reason
                            From LoginHistory
                            Where LoginStatus = 'Fail'";

        using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(Settings.ConnectionString))
        {
            using (SqlCommand objCommand = new SqlCommand(srtQry, conn))
            {
                objCommand.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
                DataTable dt = new DataTable();
                SqlDataAdapter adp = new SqlDataAdapter(objCommand);
                conn.Open();
                adp.Fill(dt);
                if (dt != null)
                {
                    listDataRow = dt.AsEnumerable().ToList();
                }
            }
        }


        var listChartHist = (from p in listDataRow
                        select new ChartHist
                        {
                            LoginHistoryID = p.Field<Int32>("LoginHistoryID"),
                            LoginDuration_Pass = p.Field<Int32>("LoginDuration_Pass"),
                            LoginDuration_Fail = p.Field<Int32>("LoginDuration_Fail"),
                            LoginDateTime = p.Field<DateTime>("LoginDateTime"),
                            LoginLocationID = p.Field<Int32>("LoginLocationID"),
                            LoginUserEmailID = p.Field<Int32>("LoginUserEmailID"),
                            LoginApplicationID = p.Field<Int32>("LoginApplicationID"),
                            LoginEnvironmentID = p.Field<Int32>("LoginEnvironmentID"),
                            ScriptFrequency = p.Field<Int32>("ScriptFrequency"),
                            LoginStatus = p.Field<String>("LoginStatus"),
                            Reason = p.Field<String>("Reason")
                        }).ToList();

        return listChartHist;            
    }

EF:

            public static List<ChartHist> ListHistory()
    {
        using (var db = new LatencyDBContext())
        {
            var loginHist = (from hist in db.LoginHistories
                             select new { LoginHistory = hist }).ToList();


            //PUT LOGIN HISTORY RECORDS INTO A LOCAL LIST
            var listHistory = new List<ChartHist>();
            foreach (var item in loginHist)
            {
                var localHistData = new ChartHist();

                localHistData.LoginHistoryID = item.LoginHistory.LoginHistoryID;

                //split up the duration for pass and fail values
                if (item.LoginHistory.LoginStatus.ToUpper() == "PASS")
                {
                    localHistData.LoginDuration_Pass = Convert.ToDouble(item.LoginHistory.LoginDuration);
                    localHistData.LoginDuration_Fail = 0;
                }
                else if (item.LoginHistory.LoginStatus.ToUpper() == "FAIL")
                {
                    localHistData.LoginDuration_Pass = 0;
                    localHistData.LoginDuration_Fail = Convert.ToDouble(item.LoginHistory.LoginDuration);
                }

                localHistData.LoginDateTime = item.LoginHistory.LoginDateTime;
                localHistData.LoginLocationID = item.LoginHistory.LoginLocationID;
                localHistData.LoginUserEmailID = item.LoginHistory.LoginUserEmailID;
                localHistData.LoginApplicationID = item.LoginHistory.LoginApplicationID;
                localHistData.LoginEnvironmentID = item.LoginHistory.LoginEnvironmentID;
                localHistData.LoginStatus = item.LoginHistory.LoginStatus;
                localHistData.Reason = item.LoginHistory.Reason;
                localHistData.ScriptFrequency = item.LoginHistory.ScriptFrequency;

                listHistory.Add(localHistData);
            }

            return listHistory;
        }
    }
3
  • What SQL does your EF query generate then?
    – millimoose
    Feb 13 '13 at 20:31
  • SELECT [Extent1].[LoginHistoryID] AS [LoginHistoryID], [Extent1].[LoginDuration] AS [LoginDuration], [Extent1].[LoginDateTime] AS [LoginDateTime], [Extent1].[LoginLocationID] AS [LoginLocationID], [Extent1].[LoginUserEmailID] AS [LoginUserEmailID], [Extent1].[LoginApplicationID] AS [LoginApplicationID], [Extent1].[LoginEnvironmentID] AS [LoginEnvironmentID], [Extent1].[ScriptFrequency] AS [ScriptFrequency], [Extent1].[LoginStatus] AS [LoginStatus], [Extent1].[Reason] AS [Reason] FROM [dbo].[LoginHistory] AS [Extent1]
    – ADH
    Feb 13 '13 at 20:40
  • Try removing the .ToList(); from loginHist in the EF version and see if that makes a difference.
    – Bobson
    Feb 13 '13 at 20:58
0

Of course EF will take longer to execute than a plain old SQL query, and there's very little that you can do about it (except write the most optimal LINQ queries that you can).

There's a very simple reason why this is so. Running a direct SQL command will just send back the data, with no muss and no fuss attached to it, waiting for you to do the data manipulations to get it to the point where it fits nicely into whatever data structure you want it in. Running EF, on the other hand, means that not only does it run the SQL command, but it massages the data for you into objects that you can manipulate right away. That extra action of going through ADO.NET and converting the data into the objects automatically means that it will take longer than just doing the plain SQL query.

On the flip side of that coin, however, EF does provide a very nice and simple way to debug and solve whatever problems you might have from a specific query/function (like by any exceptions thrown).

3
  • Thanks for the information. I am going to remove the bulk of the EF aspects of my code and write one very nice T-Sql statement.
    – ADH
    Feb 13 '13 at 21:03
  • @IronMan84 - I was writing up my reason for it, but I kept revising it. I feel like you're misrepresenting EF here, but I'm having a hard time calling out specifically why. EF is inherently slower, but not inherently significantly slower
    – Bobson
    Feb 13 '13 at 22:14
  • I didn't say it was significantly slower (although it can be if your LINQ query isn't optimal). I was just answering why it typically would be slower. Feb 13 '13 at 22:17
0

I can't performance test this, but try this solution instead before you remove EF entirely:

var loginHist = db.LoginHistories.Where(item => item.LoginStatus.ToUpper() == "PASS" || item.LoginStatus.ToUpper() == "FAIL")
                  .Select(item => new ChartHist()
                  {

                    LoginHistoryID = item.LoginHistoryID,
                    LoginDuration_Pass = item.LoginStatus.ToUpper() == "PASS" ? Convert.ToDouble(item.LoginDuration) : 0,
                    LoginDuration_Fail = item.LoginStatus.ToUpper() == "FAIL" ? Convert.ToDouble(item.LoginDuration) : 0,

                    LoginDateTime = item.LoginDateTime,
                    LoginLocationID = item.LoginLocationID,
                    LoginUserEmailID = item.LoginUserEmailID,
                    LoginApplicationID = item.LoginApplicationID,
                    LoginEnvironmentID = item.LoginEnvironmentID,
                    LoginStatus = item.LoginStatus,
                    Reason = item.Reason,
                    ScriptFrequency = item.ScriptFrequency,

                  });
return loginHist.ToList();

This is the "correct" way to populate a new object from a select. It will only retrieve the data you care about, and will put it directly into the object, rather than converting it into an object and then converting it again, from one object to another.

Note: I prefer the functional calls to the from / select form, but it'd be correct either way.

1
  • That is good code. I will update my other repository functions with it, but I already replaced the LoginHistories query with T-Sql and it is working very nice and is much faster.
    – ADH
    Feb 14 '13 at 21:51

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