55

I get this error:

Error: unexpected 'else' in " else"

From this if, else statement:

if (dsnt<0.05) {
     wilcox.test(distance[result=='nt'],distance[result=='t'],alternative=c("two.sided"),paired=TRUE) }
else {
      if (dst<0.05) {
wilcox.test(distance[result=='nt'],distance[result=='t'],alternative=c("two.sided"),paired=TRUE) }
   else {
         t.test(distance[result=='nt'],distance[result=='t'],alternative=c("two.sided"),paired=TRUE)       } }

What is wrong with this?

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82

You need to rearrange your curly brackets. Your first statement is complete, so R interprets it as such and produces syntax errors on the other lines. Your code should look like:

if (dsnt<0.05) {
  wilcox.test(distance[result=='nt'],distance[result=='t'],alternative=c("two.sided"),paired=TRUE)
} else if (dst<0.05) {
  wilcox.test(distance[result=='nt'],distance[result=='t'],alternative=c("two.sided"),paired=TRUE)
} else {
  t.test(distance[result=='nt'],distance[result=='t'],alternative=c("two.sided"),paired=TRUE)       
} 

To put it more simply, if you have:

if(condition == TRUE) x <- TRUE
else x <- FALSE

Then R reads the first line and because it is complete, runs that in its entirety. When it gets to the next line, it goes "Else? Else what?" because it is a completely new statement. To have R interpret the else as part of the preceding if statement, you must have curly brackets to tell R that you aren't yet finished:

if(condition == TRUE) {x <- TRUE
 } else {x <- FALSE}
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  • It's just odd that R requires this only when the if statement isn't inside a block. Inside of a block, you can write the else on its own and R will correctly associate it with the preceding if. Outside of a block, it won't. Weird. – Andrew Schulman Jun 25 '19 at 17:31
  • 1
    You're right, but I don't think it's that weird. When in a block, R can look ahead and see what comes next because all instructions are given at once, whereas in line by line it doesn't have a way to look ahead to the next line. – sebastian-c Jun 28 '19 at 14:00
7

I would suggest to read up a bit on the syntax. See here.

if (dsnt<0.05) {
  wilcox.test(distance[result=='nt'],distance[result=='t'],alternative=c("two.sided"),paired=TRUE) 
} else if (dst<0.05) {
    wilcox.test(distance[result=='nt'],distance[result=='t'],alternative=c("two.sided"),paired=TRUE)
} else 
  t.test(distance[result=='nt'],distance[result=='t'],alternative=c("two.sided"),paired=TRUE)
| improve this answer | | | | |
  • Just when I thought that I should add the rewritten code to be nice, I realized the answer already been answered by sebastian-c .. – nadizan Feb 14 '13 at 0:07
  • 1
    Sorry about that. I did appreciate the link to the language definition, though. It does answer the question. – sebastian-c Feb 14 '13 at 0:17

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