21

Given an array of integers eg [1, 2, -3, 1] find whether there is a sub-sequence that sums to 0 and return it (eg [1, 2, -3] or [2, -3, 1]).
Checking every sub-sequence is O(n^2) which is too inefficient. Any idea for improvements?

5
  • i would post it here: cs.stackexchange.com. By the way i don't think that cheking every sub-sequence is O(n^2). It should be O(2^n) i.e. exponential. With O(n^2) you rather mean the online method.
    – A.B.
    Commented Feb 14, 2013 at 0:33
  • if they are consecutive subsequences there are n-1*n-2 combinations
    – argentage
    Commented Feb 14, 2013 at 1:02
  • 6
    Continuous subsequence? Or any subsequence? Formally, the term "subsequence" does not imply continuity. Your example is non-definitive. Commented Feb 14, 2013 at 1:20
  • 3
    The non-continuous version is the en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knapsack_problem and is understood to be in NP, which I'm sure you know. Based on the bounds for the brute force computation I am assuming it's not that one.
    – argentage
    Commented Feb 14, 2013 at 1:32
  • If you found that my answer solved the problem you had, would you please accept it?
    – argentage
    Commented Feb 18, 2013 at 19:36

5 Answers 5

37

Make a new array with each element equal to the sum of the previous elements plus that one.

Input:

1  4 -3 -4  6  -7  8 -5

Becomes:

1  5  2  -2  4  -3  5  0
   ^                ^

Then look for elements that match in the resulting array.

Since these represent locations where the overall change in the function is zero, you will find that if their position is i and k then the subsequence (i+1, k) is a zero-sum subsequence. (In this case, [2:6]).

Additionally, any zeros in the table indicate that the subsequence (0, k) is a zero-sum subsequence. For the lookup, a hash table or other fast collision locator makes this O(N) to perform.

5
  • 4
    This is excellent. Can you point to any link or literature on this specific solution? Does this problem and/or solution have a formal name?
    – istepaniuk
    Commented May 20, 2014 at 21:24
  • Isn't the creation of the running sum array n^2 time?
    – user4256874
    Commented Feb 19, 2016 at 12:09
  • no, because of the handy property that the sum from 0 to n+1 is the same as the sum of 0 to n + n+1.
    – argentage
    Commented Feb 19, 2016 at 19:18
  • 6
    @airza Subsequence is different from subarray. Not sure why was this accepted as correct answer without verification. Take this example: 1,2,3,3,4,-5 where prefix would be 1,3,6,9,13,8
    – everlasto
    Commented Nov 23, 2017 at 7:00
  • I'm not sure what you mean; if you are referring to a subsequence as "take any elements from the array even if they are not contiguous" then it is (as I commented on the question) a problem in NP. Since the original poster referred to the naive solution as in O(N^2) I assume they were not looking for that.
    – argentage
    Commented Apr 9, 2022 at 11:18
12

Do a running sum, storing sum values in a hash table along with array index

If you ever get a sum value you’ve already seen, return 1+the index in the hash table, and the current index. This solution is O(n) time complexity.

No need for a new array. Space complexity is O(N) because of the hash.


A Python implementation:

input = [1, 4, -3, -4, 6, -7, 8, -5]
map = {}
sum = 0
for i in range(len(input)):
    sum += input[i]
    if sum in map:
        print map[sum][0] + 1, "to", i
    map[sum] = (i, sum)

Notice that repeated subsequences are not shown, example: If (1 to 2) is a subsequence and (3 to 4), (1 to 4) won't be shown. You can achieve this behavior by storing lists in each position of the map:

for x in map[sum]:
    print x[0]+1, "to", i
map[sum].append((i, sum))
1
  • 1
    You neglected to count the space required by the hash table. For efficient hash table behaviour it must be larger than the set of possible values.
    – nneonneo
    Commented Jun 17, 2015 at 17:09
2

Below is the java implementation of the solution suggested by @Fabricio

    public static int countAllSubSequenceForZeroSum(int[] array) {
    int count = 0;
    Map<Integer, Integer> encounteredSum = new HashMap<>();
    int prev = array[0];
    if(prev == 0) {
        count++;
        System.out.println("Found at index: "+0);
    }
    for (int i = 1; i < array.length; i++) {
        prev += array[i];
        if(encounteredSum.containsKey(prev)) {
            System.out.println("Found at index: "+i+ " start index: "+encounteredSum.get(prev));
            printSequenceForZeroSum(array, i);
            count++;
        } else {
            encounteredSum.put(prev, i);
        }
    }
    return count;
}

public static void printSequenceForZeroSum(int[] array, int endIndex) {
    int sum = array[endIndex];
    while(sum!=0) {
        System.out.print(array[endIndex]+ "  ");
        sum += array[--endIndex];
    }
    System.out.println(array[endIndex]);
}
0

A C++ implementation with logic similar to Fabricio's answer.

pair<int, int> FindSubsequenceSum(const vector<int>& arr)      
{
  map<int, int> sumMap;
  map<int, int>::iterator it;
  int sum = 0;
  for (int i = 0; i < arr.size(); i++) 
  {
    sum += arr[i];
    it = sumMap.find(sum);
    if (it != sumMap.end()) 
    {
        return make_pair(it->second + 1, i);
    } else {
        sumMap.insert(make_pair(sum, i));
  }
}

int main()
{
  int arr[] = {1,4,-3,-4,6,-7,8,-5};
  vector<int> input(arr, arr + sizeof(arr) / sizeof(arr[0]));
  pair<int, int> result = FindSubsequenceSum(input);

  cout << "(" << result.first << "," << result.second << ")" << endl;

  return 0;
}

Output:
(2,6)
0

A scala implementation:

List(1,2,3,4).scan(0){_+_}

the result will be List(0, 1, 3, 6, 10) .

or you can:

List(1,2,3,4).scan(0){_+_}.tail  

get List(1, 3, 6, 10)

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