In Java, we have Collections.emptyList() and Collections.EMPTY_LIST. Both have the same property:

Returns the empty list (immutable). This list is serializable.

So what is the exact difference between using the one or the other?

up vote 98 down vote accepted
  • Collections.EMPTY_LIST returns an old-style List
  • Collections.emptyList() uses type-inference and therefore returns List<T>

Collections.emptyList() was added in Java 1.5 and it is probably always preferable. This way, you don't need to unnecessarily cast around within your code.

Collections.emptyList() intrinsically does the cast for you.

@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
public static final <T> List<T> emptyList() {
    return (List<T>) EMPTY_LIST;
}
  • 1
    I'm not 100% certain of this, but I believe that using/returning the untyped version (EMPTY_LIST/EMPTY_SET/EMPTY_MAP) causes the compiler to give up on generics type checking within the given call chain. It essentially figures that it has wandered into old code lacking generic types and gives up. – Matt Passell Sep 23 '15 at 17:43

Lets get to the source :

 public static final List EMPTY_LIST = new EmptyList<>();

and

@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
public static final <T> List<T> emptyList() {
    return (List<T>) EMPTY_LIST;
}

They are absolutely equal objects.

public static final List EMPTY_LIST = new EmptyList<>();

public static final <T> List<T> emptyList() {
    return (List<T>) EMPTY_LIST;
}

The only one is that emptyList() returns generic List<T>, so you can assign this list to generic collection without any warnings.

In other words, EMPTY_LIST is not type safe:

  List list = Collections.EMPTY_LIST;
  Set set = Collections.EMPTY_SET;
  Map map = Collections.EMPTY_MAP;

As compared to:

    List<String> s = Collections.emptyList();
    Set<Long> l = Collections.emptySet();
    Map<Date, String> d = Collections.emptyMap();

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