16

In my attempt to get "Steam for Linux" working on Debian, I've run into an issue. libcef (Chromium Embedded Framework) works fine with GLIBC_2.13 (which eglibc on Debian testing can provide), but requires one pesky little extra function from GLIBC_2.15 (which eglibc can't provide):

$ readelf -s libcef.so | grep -E "@GLIBC_2\.1[4567]"
1037: 00000000     0 FUNC    GLOBAL DEFAULT  UND __fdelt_chk@GLIBC_2.15 (49)
2733: 00000000     0 FUNC    GLOBAL DEFAULT  UND __fdelt_chk@@GLIBC_2.15

My plan of attack here was to LD_PRELOAD a shim library that provides just these functions. This doesn't seem to work. I really want to avoid installing GLIBC_2.17 (since it is in Debian experimental; even Debian sid still has GLIBC_2.13).


This is what I've tried.

fdelt_chk.c is basically stolen from the GNU C library:

#include <sys/select.h>

# define strong_alias(name, aliasname) _strong_alias(name, aliasname)
# define _strong_alias(name, aliasname) \
  extern __typeof (name) aliasname __attribute__ ((alias (#name)));

unsigned long int
__fdelt_chk (unsigned long int d)
{
  if (d >= FD_SETSIZE)
    __chk_fail ();

  return d / __NFDBITS;
}
strong_alias (__fdelt_chk, __fdelt_warn)

My Versions script looks as follows:

GLIBC_2.15 {
    __fdelt_chk; __fdelt_warn;
};

I then build the library as follows:

$ gcc -m32 -c -fPIC fdelt_chk.c -o fdelt_chk.o
$ gcc -m32 -shared -nostartfiles -Wl,-s -Wl,--version-script Versions -o fdelt_chk.so fdelt_chk.o

However, if I then run Steam (with a bunch of extra stuff to get it working in the first place), the loader still refuses to find the symbol:

% LD_LIBRARY_PATH="/home/tinctorius/.local/share/Steam/ubuntu12_32" LD_PRELOAD=./fdelt_chk.so:./steamui.so ./steam 
./steam: /lib/i386-linux-gnu/i686/cmov/libc.so.6: version `GLIBC_2.15' not found (required by /home/tinctorius/.local/share/Steam/ubuntu12_32/libcef.so)    

However, the version symbol is also provided by the .so I just built:

% readelf -s fdelt_chk.so

Symbol table '.dynsym' contains 8 entries:
   Num:    Value  Size Type    Bind   Vis      Ndx Name
     0: 00000000     0 NOTYPE  LOCAL  DEFAULT  UND 
     1: 00000000     0 FUNC    GLOBAL DEFAULT  UND __chk_fail@GLIBC_2.3.4 (3)
     2: 0000146c     0 NOTYPE  GLOBAL DEFAULT  ABS _edata
     3: 0000146c     0 NOTYPE  GLOBAL DEFAULT  ABS _end
     4: 00000310    44 FUNC    GLOBAL DEFAULT   11 __fdelt_warn@@GLIBC_2.15
     5: 00000310    44 FUNC    GLOBAL DEFAULT   11 __fdelt_chk@@GLIBC_2.15
     6: 00000000     0 OBJECT  GLOBAL DEFAULT  ABS GLIBC_2.15
     7: 0000146c     0 NOTYPE  GLOBAL DEFAULT  ABS __bss_start

At this point, I don't know what I can do to trick the loader (who?) into choosing my symbols. Am I going in the right direction at all?

  • 1
    Try to enable LD_DEBUG=all and check, how rtld (ld-linux.so) searches for __fdelt and @@GLIBC_2.15 – osgx Feb 14 '13 at 17:49
  • So much logspam. It seems that it's only looking at /lib/i386-linux-gnu/i686/cmov/libc.so.6 and immediately giving up. Perhaps I need to choose a proper soname for fdelt_chk.so... – user824425 Feb 14 '13 at 19:53
  • Setting -Wl,-soname,libc.so.6 kills everything, because now it won't look further than my own library. Would it be possible to import the actual libc by absolute soname, and re-export all other symbols? – user824425 Feb 14 '13 at 20:18
  • why not adding glibc from ubuntu in steam library path? – sherpya Feb 25 '13 at 0:55
9

I ran into this same problem, though not with Steam. What I was trying to run wanted 2.15 for fdelt_chk while my system had 2.14. I found a solution for simple cases like ours where we can easily provide our own implementation for the missing functionality.

I started out from your attempted solution of implementing the functionality and LD_PRELOADing it. Using LD_DEBUG=all (as suggested by osgx) showed that the linker was still looking for 2.15, so just having the right symbol wasn't enough and there was some other versioning mechanism somewhere. I noticed that objdump -p and readelf -V both showed references to 2.15, so I looked up documentation on ELF and found information on version requirements.

So my new goal was to transform references to 2.15 into references to something else. It seemed reasonable that I could just overwrite structures that referred to 2.15 with the structures that referred to some lower version, like 2.1. In the end, after some trial and error, I found just editing the right Elfxx_Vernaux(es?) in .gnu.version_r was sufficient, but caveat hacker, I guess.

The .gnu.version_r section is a list of 16-byte Elfxx_Verneeds and 16-byte Elfxx_Vernauxes. Each Elfxx_Verneed entry is followed by the associated Elfxx_Vernauxes. As far as I could tell, vn_file is actually how many associated Elfxx_Vernauxes there are, even though the docs say number of associated verneed array entries. It might just be a misunderstanding on my part, though.

So, to start off making the edits, let's look at some of the info from readelf -V. I snipped out parts we don't care about.

$ readelf -V mybinary
<snip stuff before .gnu.version_r>
Version needs section '.gnu.version_r' contains 5 entries:
 Addr: 0x00000000000021ac  Offset: 0x0021ac  Link: 4 (.dynstr)
<snip libraries that don't refer to GLIBC_2.15>
  0x00c0: Version: 1  File: libc.so.6  Cnt: 10
  0x00d0:   Name: GLIBC_2.3  Flags: none  Version: 19
  0x00e0:   Name: GLIBC_2.7  Flags: none  Version: 16
  0x00f0:   Name: GLIBC_2.2  Flags: none  Version: 15
  0x0100:   Name: GLIBC_2.2.4  Flags: none  Version: 14
  0x0110:   Name: GLIBC_2.1.3  Flags: none  Version: 13
  0x0120:   Name: GLIBC_2.15  Flags: none  Version: 12
  0x0130:   Name: GLIBC_2.4  Flags: none  Version: 10
  0x0140:   Name: GLIBC_2.1  Flags: none  Version: 9
  0x0150:   Name: GLIBC_2.3.4  Flags: none  Version: 4
  0x0160:   Name: GLIBC_2.0  Flags: none  Version: 2

From this we see that the section starts at 0x21ac. Each file listed will have a Elfxx_Verneed followed by an Elfxx_Vernaux for each of the subentries (like GLIBC_2.3). I assume the order of the info in the output will always match the order in the file since readelf is just dumping the structures. Here's my entire .gnu.version_r section.

000021A0                                          01 00 02 00
000021B0   A3 0C 00 00  10 00 00 00  30 00 00 00  11 69 69 0D
000021C0   00 00 11 00  32 0D 00 00  10 00 00 00  10 69 69 0D
000021D0   00 00 0B 00  3C 0D 00 00  00 00 00 00  01 00 02 00
000021E0   BE 0C 00 00  10 00 00 00  30 00 00 00  13 69 69 0D
000021F0   00 00 08 00  46 0D 00 00  10 00 00 00  10 69 69 0D
00002200   00 00 07 00  3C 0D 00 00  00 00 00 00  01 00 02 00
00002210   99 0C 00 00  10 00 00 00  30 00 00 00  11 69 69 0D
00002220   00 00 06 00  32 0D 00 00  10 00 00 00  10 69 69 0D
00002230   00 00 05 00  3C 0D 00 00  00 00 00 00  01 00 02 00
00002240   AE 0C 00 00  10 00 00 00  30 00 00 00  11 69 69 0D
00002250   00 00 12 00  32 0D 00 00  10 00 00 00  10 69 69 0D
00002260   00 00 03 00  3C 0D 00 00  00 00 00 00  01 00 0A 00
00002270   FF 0C 00 00  10 00 00 00  00 00 00 00  13 69 69 0D
00002280   00 00 13 00  46 0D 00 00  10 00 00 00  17 69 69 0D
00002290   00 00 10 00  50 0D 00 00  10 00 00 00  12 69 69 0D
000022A0   00 00 0F 00  5A 0D 00 00  10 00 00 00  74 1A 69 09
000022B0   00 00 0E 00  64 0D 00 00  10 00 00 00  73 1F 69 09
000022C0   00 00 0D 00  70 0D 00 00  10 00 00 00  95 91 96 06
000022D0   00 00 0C 00  7C 0D 00 00  10 00 00 00  14 69 69 0D
000022E0   00 00 0A 00  87 0D 00 00  10 00 00 00  11 69 69 0D
000022F0   00 00 09 00  32 0D 00 00  10 00 00 00  74 19 69 09
00002300   00 00 04 00  91 0D 00 00  10 00 00 00  10 69 69 0D
00002310   00 00 02 00  3C 0D 00 00  00 00 00 00

To briefly talk about the structure here, it starts out with an Elfxx_Verneed. As per the docs, we can see there will be 2 Elfxx_Vernauxes, one offset 16 bytes, and the next Elfxx_Verneed is offset 48 bytes. These offsets are from the start of the current structure. It looks like technically the associated Elfxx_Vernauxes might not be adjacent after the current Elfxx_Verneed but it was actually so in all the files I poked around in.

From this we can find the file we want (libc.so.6) in a few different ways. Cross reference the string (which I won't get into), find the Elfxx_Verneed with a count of 0A 00 (10, matching our readelf output above), or find the last Elfxx_Verneed since it's the last one readelf output. In any case, the right one for my file is at 0x226C. Its first Elfxx_Vernaux starts at 0x227C.

We want to find the Elfxx_Vernaux with a version of 0C 00 (12, again matching our readelf output above). We see the Elfxx_Vernaux that matches is at 0x22CC and the entire structure is 95 91 96 06 00 00 0C 00 7C 0D 00 00 10 00 00 00. We'll be overwriting the first 12 bytes so as to leave the offset alone. We're only modifying the data, not moving around the structures, after all.

To pick the data to overwrite with, we just copy it from a different Elfxx_Vernaux for a version of glibc we can satisfy. I picked one for 2.1, which is at 0x22EC in my file, with the data 11 69 69 0D 00 00 09 00 32 0D 00 00 10 00 00 00. So take the first 12 bytes from this and overwrite the first 12 bytes above, and that's it for the hex editing.

Of course, you might have multiple references to deal with. Your program might have multiple binaries to edit.

At this point, our program still won't run. But instead of being told something like GLIBC_2.15 not found it should complain about missing __fdelt_chk. Now we do the shim and LD_PRELOADing described in the question, except instead of versioning our implementation as 2.15, we use the version we picked while hex editing. At this point the program should run.

This method depends on being able to provide an implementation for whatever's missing. Our __fdelt_chk is extremely simple but I don't doubt that in some cases providing an implementation could be more difficult than just upgrading the system's libc instead.

  • Thanks for link! Your solutions sounds like a hack. Can you show hex data before and after and show us in detail, how to find offsets? – osgx Mar 5 '13 at 20:05
  • 2
    Expanded my answer. It's definitely a hack, heh. – Fyren Mar 6 '13 at 19:52
  • I've accepted this answer, not because it's a perfect fit, but because it describes the most straightforward solution in detail, and I think there is no good other way to do it. Thanks :) – user824425 Mar 10 '14 at 23:40
8

For what it's worth, the __fdelt_chk function is related to the FORTIFY_SOURCE feature which was added in glibc 2.15. It enables compile-time and run-time checking for buffer overflows.

If you were able to recompile with the following CFLAGS added, it would build a backwards compatible binary without the extra checking:

-U_FORTIFY_SOURCE -D_FORTIFY_SOURCE=0
  • 1
    Unfortunately that -U_FORTIFY_SOURCE -D_FORTIFY_SOURCE=0 suggestion didn't remove the __fdelt_chk symbol. I'm also linking to pthreads which perhaps may be using it. – Matt Jan 27 '14 at 2:35
  • FWIW, it solved the problem for me after settings the flags, then replacing readline, and then this: forums.gentoo.org/… – Michael Schubert Jan 15 '16 at 21:13
  • works for me, removed __fdelt_chk@GLIBC_2.15 and __longjmp_chk@GLIBC_2.11 – zhaorufei Apr 12 '17 at 5:10

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