21

i am using the following

Task.Factory.StartNew(() => DoPrintConfigPage(serial));

then the function i am calling looks like this

private void DoPrintConfigPage(string serial) 
{ 
    //do printing work 
}

My problem is an exception is being thrown inside the thread and not being handled.

I have tried wrapping it in a try catch

try
{
    Task.Factory.StartNew(() => DoPrintConfigPage(serial));
}
catch (Exception ex) { }

but it still is not catching the error and thus crashing the application.

How can I catch exceptions in the main thread so I can handle them?

Update

I have made the changes recommended below and still it is saying the exception is unhandled

var task =  Task.Factory.StartNew(() => DoPrintConfigPage(serial))
                               .ContinueWith(tsk =>
                               {
                                  MessageBox.Show("something broke");
                               },TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnFaulted);

then in my DoConfigPage I added another try catch.

In this catch is now where it is crashing and saying the exception being thrown was unhandled, what am I missing?

private void DoPrintConfigPage(string serial)
{
    try
    {
        //call the print function
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        throw ex;   //it is crashing here and saying it is unhandled
    }
}

I also tried what Eric J. suggested with the same results

var task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => DoPrintConfigPage(serial));

try
{
    task.Wait();                  
}
catch (AggregateException ex) { MessageBox.Show("something broke"); }
39

Alternatively, you can chain your task creation and add a ContinueWith:

var job = Task.Factory
    .StartNew(...)
    .ContinueWith(tsk => 
         {
              // check tsk for exception and handle
         });

EDIT: This snippet, when run, pops up the message box for me:

void Main()
{
    var serial = "some serial";
    var task =  Task.Factory
        .StartNew(() => DoPrintConfigPage(serial))
        .ContinueWith(tsk =>
        {
            MessageBox.Show("something broke");
            var flattened = tsk.Exception.Flatten();

            // NOTE: Don't actually handle exceptions this way, m'kay?
            flattened.Handle(ex => { MessageBox.Show("Error:" + ex.Message); return true;});
        },TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnFaulted);

}

public void DoPrintConfigPage(string serial)
{
    throw new Exception("BOOM!");
}
8
  • 9
    Of note is the TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnFaulted parameter you can add so that the continuation only runs when there is an exception, effectively making it act like a catch block. – Servy Feb 14 '13 at 21:02
  • @servy Good call; I always forget about that – JerKimball Feb 14 '13 at 21:06
  • See updated code, i attempted this and it still isn't handling it. – twaldron Feb 14 '13 at 21:25
  • That isn't what you want to do - all you're doing now is throwing a different exception in the continuation; If you want to handle any exceptions in the continuation itself, you'd check Task.IsFaulted, then the Exception property - but regardless, you are still try/catching in the wrong place - you'll wrap the thing that waits for the task to complete, not the creation. – JerKimball Feb 14 '13 at 21:39
  • Thanks I got it..It was still showing an unhandled exception while debugging but when running not debugging it worked just fine and did what I needed it to do. Thanks for the help! – twaldron Feb 14 '13 at 22:00
11

Your try block is exited right after you start the new task, because that method just continues to run.

Instead you can catch the Exception as an AggregateException where you wait for the task (or multiple tasks) to complete:

var task1 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
{
    throw new MyCustomException("I'm bad, but not too bad!");
});

try
{
    task1.Wait();
}
catch (AggregateException ae)
{
    // Assume we know what's going on with this particular exception. 
    // Rethrow anything else. AggregateException.Handle provides 
    // another way to express this. See later example. 
    foreach (var e in ae.InnerExceptions)
    {
        if (e is MyCustomException)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(e.Message);
        }
        else
        {
            throw;
        }
    }

}

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd997415.aspx

7

If you are not waiting on your task, I think the easiest solution is found in Task.Exception:

Gets the AggregateException that caused the Task to end prematurely. If the Task completed successfully or has not yet thrown any exceptions, this will return null.

I am using something like this:

Task.Factory.StartNew(() => DoStuffHere())
    .ContinueWith(task =>
    {
        if (task.Exception != null)
            Log("log all the exceptions!");
    });
3

You should also know about System.Threading.Tasks.TaskScheduler.UnobservedTaskException.

If you are in the business of creating "fire and forget" Task instances, you'll want to subscribe to that event at the start of your program.

0

Maybe you are trying to catch a Corrupted State Exception. Since .NET 4 applications are unable to catch such exceptions by default. You could try to add the legacyCorruptedState­­ExceptionsPolicy=true entry to your configuration file as stated in the MSDN article linked above.

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