132

I'm trying to create a hello world project for Linux dynamic libraries (.so files). So I have a file hello.c:

#include <stdio.h>
void hello()
{
    printf("Hello world!\n");
}

How do I create a .so file that exports hello(), using gcc from the command line?

232

To generate a shared library you need first to compile your C code with the -fPIC (position independent code) flag.

gcc -c -fPIC hello.c -o hello.o

This will generate an object file (.o), now you take it and create the .so file:

gcc hello.o -shared -o libhello.so

EDIT: Suggestions from the comments:

You can use

gcc -shared -o libhello.so -fPIC hello.c

to do it in one step. – Jonathan Leffler

I also suggest to add -Wall to get all warnings, and -g to get debugging information, to your gcc commands. – Basile Starynkevitch

  • 1
    You have to do gcc -c -fPIC blabla.c -o blabla.o first, then the above command. – dreamcrash Feb 14 '13 at 21:22
  • 43
    Or gcc -shared -o libhello.so -fPIC hello.c to do it in one step. – Jonathan Leffler Feb 14 '13 at 22:52
  • 5
    I also suggest to add -Wall to get all warnings, and -g to get debugging information, to your gcc commands. – Basile Starynkevitch Feb 14 '13 at 22:57
  • Thanks for the recommendations, I added them to the answer – dreamcrash Feb 14 '13 at 23:12
  • 3
    @sashoalm .o file is basically an object file for source file, before linking them together, into the final executable. So when you run gcc -o abc.c abc.o an object file would be generated. Ans then you can use this abc.o file to create .so file. For creating so many files, all you need is a correct c code written in a .c file. PS: Just for clearing your doubt in the comment. – user2279942 Apr 17 '13 at 5:51

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