33

In my code I have the following to run a remote script.

ssh root@host.domain.com "sh /home/user/backup_mysql.sh"

For some reason it keeps 255'ing on me. Any ideas?

I can SSH into the box just fine (passless keys setup)

REMOTE SCRIPT:

MUSER='root' 
MPASS='123123'
MHOST="127.0.0.1"
VERBOSE=0

### Set bins path ###
GZIP=/bin/gzip
MYSQL=/usr/bin/mysql
MYSQLDUMP=/usr/bin/mysqldump
RM=/bin/rm
MKDIR=/bin/mkdir
MYSQLADMIN=/usr/bin/mysqladmin
GREP=/bin/grep

### Setup dump directory ###
BAKRSNROOT=/.snapshots/tmp

#####################################
### ----[ No Editing below ]------###
#####################################
### Default time format ###
TIME_FORMAT='%H_%M_%S%P'

### Make a backup ###
backup_mysql_rsnapshot(){
        local DBS="$($MYSQL -u $MUSER -h $MHOST -p$MPASS -Bse 'show databases')"
        local db="";
        [ ! -d $BAKRSNROOT ] && ${MKDIR} -p $BAKRSNROOT
        ${RM} -f $BAKRSNROOT/* >/dev/null 2>&1
#       [ $VERBOSE -eq 1 ] && echo "*** Dumping MySQL Database ***"
#       [ $VERBOSE -eq 1 ] && echo -n "Database> "
        for db in $DBS
        do
                local tTime=$(date +"${TIME_FORMAT}")
                local FILE="${BAKRSNROOT}/${db}.${tTime}.gz"
#               [ $VERBOSE -eq 1 ] && echo -n "$db.."
                ${MYSQLDUMP} --single-transaction -u ${MUSER} -h ${MHOST} -p${MPASS} $db | ${GZIP} -9 > $FILE
        done
#               [ $VERBOSE -eq 1 ] && echo ""
#               [ $VERBOSE -eq 1 ] && echo "*** Backup done [ files wrote to $BAKRSNROOT] ***"
}

### Die on demand with message ###
die(){
        echo "$@"
        exit 999
}

### Make sure bins exists.. else die
verify_bins(){
        [ ! -x $GZIP ] && die "File $GZIP does not exists. Make sure correct path is set in $0."
        [ ! -x $MYSQL ] && die "File $MYSQL does not exists. Make sure correct path is set in $0."
        [ ! -x $MYSQLDUMP ] && die "File $MYSQLDUMP does not exists. Make sure correct path is set in $0."
        [ ! -x $RM ] && die "File $RM does not exists. Make sure correct path is set in $0."
        [ ! -x $MKDIR ] && die "File $MKDIR does not exists. Make sure correct path is set in $0."
        [ ! -x $MYSQLADMIN ] && die "File $MYSQLADMIN does not exists. Make sure correct path is set in $0."
        [ ! -x $GREP ] && die "File $GREP does not exists. Make sure correct path is set in $0."
}

### Make sure we can connect to server ... else die
verify_mysql_connection(){
        $MYSQLADMIN  -u $MUSER -h $MHOST -p$MPASS ping | $GREP 'alive'>/dev/null
        [ $? -eq 0 ] || die "Error: Cannot connect to MySQL Server. Make sure username and password are set correctly in $0"
}

### main ####
verify_bins
verify_mysql_connection
backup_mysql_rsnapshot
  • For some reason your remote script returns 255, and ssh just delivers its result to you. How about showing us the script? – Anton Kovalenko Feb 14 '13 at 23:15
  • posted the script – Amanada Smith Feb 14 '13 at 23:33
  • 2
    As a warning, do not use garbage edits to keep bumping your question to the front of the queue. If you do this again, I will lock this question. – Brad Larson Feb 20 '13 at 2:22
  • One thing I often forget when moving the client to another machine is the first time you do it asks you to verify the fingerprint, so if you're not doing it interactively, it fails until you manage to answer that question manually for the same account. – frankieandshadow May 22 '15 at 14:23
  • 1
    I found my similar problem, so in case it helps anyone else... I could ssh on the command line, but not when run from a script. The problem was I had agent forwarding turned on when I logged into the machine from which I was doing the ssh, so the problem with my certificate (which was that it I hadn't got the permissions right) was not showing up because it used my forwarded key instead. I had to turn off agent forwarding to see the error message that the script was presumably also getting but wasn't being captured in the output. – frankieandshadow May 22 '15 at 16:01
27

This is usually happens when the remote is down/unavailable; or the remote machine doesn't have ssh installed; or a firewall doesn't allow a connection to be established to the remote host.

ssh returns 255 when an error occurred or 255 is returned by the remote script:

 EXIT STATUS

     ssh exits with the exit status of the remote command or
     with 255 if an error occurred.

Usually you would an error message something similar to:

ssh: connect to host host.domain.com port 22: No route to host

Or

ssh: connect to host HOSTNAME port 22: Connection refused

Check-list:

  • What happens if you run the ssh command directly from the command line?

  • Are you able to ping that machine?

  • Does the remote has ssh installed?

  • If installed, then is the ssh service running?

  • SSH'ing in works fine. – Amanada Smith Feb 14 '13 at 23:31
  • Then it's the script you run on the remote host that returns 255. – P.P. Feb 14 '13 at 23:31
  • 1
    It's hard to identify why your script returns 255. Most likely it's the function backup_mysql_rsnapshot that has the failing part as the other two functions return 999 in case of failure. You can ssh to that machine and test the script? You can use set -e in your script to debug it. – P.P. Feb 14 '13 at 23:41
  • script works fine locally. not sure why it is breaking remotely. ;/ – Amanada Smith Feb 14 '13 at 23:43
  • 1
    For example, ${MYSQLDUMP} --single-transaction -u ${MUSER} -h ${MHOST} -p${MPASS} $db || exit 101 etc – P.P. Feb 15 '13 at 0:04
11

This error will also occur when using pdsh to hosts which are not contained in your "known_hosts" file.

I was able to correct this by SSH'ing into each host manually and accepting the question "Do you want to add this to known hosts".

  • 1
    -x "-o UserKnownHostsFile=/dev/null -o StrictHostKeyChecking=no" worked for me as well – zpon Nov 2 '16 at 6:55
4

If there's a problem with authentication or connection, such as not being able to read a password from the terminal, ssh will exit with 255 without being able to run your actual script. Verify to make sure you can run 'true' instead, to see if the ssh connection is established successfully.

3

I was stumped by this. Once I got passed the 255 problem... I ended up with a mysterious error code 1. This is the foo to get that resolved:

 pssh -x '-tt' -h HOSTFILELIST -P "sudo yum -y install glibc"

-P means write the output out as you go and is optional. But the -x '-tt' trick is what forces a psuedo tty to be allocated.

You can get a clue what the error code 1 means this if you try:

ssh AHOST "sudo yum -y install glibc"

You may see:

[slc@bastion-ci ~]$ ssh MYHOST "sudo yum -y install glibc"
sudo: sorry, you must have a tty to run sudo
[slc@bastion-ci ~]$ echo $?
1

Notice the return code for this is 1, which is what pssh is reporting to you.

I found this -x -tt trick here. Also note that turning on verbose mode (pssh --verbose) for these cases does nothing to help you.

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