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I want to get the version of Node.js on the command line. I'm expecting to run a command like:

node -version

but that doesn't work. Does anybody know what the command line would be? (i.e. not the REPL)

  • The different answers suggest completely different questions. – hawkeye Feb 15 '13 at 4:59
  • 1
    Yes, the runtime question works for the Node command line, not the shell. Of course, "command line" could refer to either thing. – Austin Mullins Feb 15 '13 at 5:01
  • 7
    Check node --help. But, in short, you need 2 dashes for full-name options: node --version. A single dash starts a group of aliases, so -version combines -v, -e, -r, etc -- though only 3 of the 7 are recognized by Node. – Jonathan Lonowski Feb 15 '13 at 5:08
  • @JonathanLonowski: Good to know about node --help (node -h works too). However, node does not support grouping of options the way you describe; e.g., node -p -i works (syntactically - as of 0.12, no combination of short options makes sense semantically), but node -pi results in an unrecognized flag / bad option (0.12) error. – mklement0 Mar 8 '15 at 3:56
  • This may help somebody! – Irf Jan 1 '19 at 7:05

14 Answers 14

1024

The command line for that is:

node -v

Or

node --version

Note:

If node -v doesn't work, but nodejs -v does, then something's not set up quite right on your system. See this other question for ways to fix it.

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  • 20
    In the year 2015, this no longer works. Use nodejs -v instead. – Andrew Thaddeus Martin Jul 8 '15 at 19:44
  • 30
    @AndrewThaddeusMartin node -v does work. I'm using latest version available today which is 0.12.6. – yannick1976 Jul 9 '15 at 8:44
  • With the latest version this does not work but it works only with older version. Thanx to Andrew – shrawan_lakhe Oct 21 '15 at 3:16
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    This works in 6.8.0: >node -v v6.8.0 >node --version v6.8.0 – Doctor Jones Oct 13 '16 at 13:24
  • 1
    node -v => v8.11.2 => So this works also for v8.11.2 – Valentin Grégoire Aug 29 '18 at 12:42
81

If you're referring to the shell command line, either of the following will work:

node -v

node --version

Just typing node version will cause node.js to attempt loading a module named version, which doesn't exist unless you like working with confusing module names.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    You're welcome. Note, however, that the OP typed node -version, not node version. The former reports an unrecognized flag / bad option (in 0.12) error and then enters the REPL, whereas the latter indeed tries to load a non-existent file, and aborts without entering the REPL. @JonathanLonowski has already stated it in a comment on the question, but let me repeat it here: node -h or node --help shows all supported command-line options. – mklement0 Mar 8 '15 at 3:38
38

Try nodejs instead of just node

$ nodejs -v
v0.10.25
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  • 7
    Note: The node.js executable (binary) should be node, not nodejs. However, there was a naming conflict on some Linux distros (e.g., Ubuntu), resulting in the executable getting installed as nodejs. As of Ubuntu 14.04, for instance, apt-get install nodejs will also install executable node (implemented as a symlink to nodejs). In other words: For consistency, try node -v first. – mklement0 Mar 8 '15 at 4:10
12

If you want to check in command prompt use node -v or node --version

v6.9.5

If u have node.exe then in node you can give.

>process
process {
  title: 'node',
  version: 'v6.9.5',
  .......
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  • 2
    If you have node.exe, then >process.version will only show the version and not the full process object – JFK Mar 9 '17 at 21:45
11

Node:

node --version or node -v

npm:

npm --version or npm -v

V8 engine version:

node -p process.versions.v8
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9

Repl Command to find the Nodejs Version

$node
>process.version
`v8.x`
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8

find the installed node version.

$ node --version

or

 $ node -v

And if you want more information about installed node(i.e. node version,v8 version,platform,env variables info etc.)

then just do this.

$ node
> process
  process {
  title: 'node',
  version: 'v6.6.0',
  moduleLoadList: 
   [ 'Binding contextify',
     'Binding natives',
     'NativeModule events',
     'NativeModule util',
     'Binding uv',
     'NativeModule buffer',
     'Binding buffer',
     'Binding util',
     ...

where The process object is a global that provides information about, and control over, the current Node.js process.

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  • >process.version will only show the version and not the full process object – JFK Mar 9 '17 at 21:46
5

By default node package is nodejs, so use

$ nodejs -v

or

$ nodejs --version 

You can make a link using

$ sudo ln -s /usr/bin/nodejs /usr/bin/node

then u can use

$ node --version

or

$ node -v
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5

You can check if you have Node and Npm installed by typing:

$node --version && npm --version

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4

Just type npm version in your command line and it will display all the version details about node, npm, v8 engine etc.

enter image description here

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1

One cool tip if you are using the Atom editor.

$ apm -v
apm  1.12.5
npm  3.10.5
node 4.4.5
python 2.7.12
git 2.7.4

It will return you not only the node version but also few other things.

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  • 1
    apm -v will tell you the version of node and npm that Atom is using. It may not necessarily be the one that will be if you are using the command line – Hello Universe May 11 '17 at 2:30
0

On an Arm7 (armhf) device running Debian Stretch, I had to issue either of the following:

$ nodejs -v
$ nodejs -h

The following did not work:

$ node -v
$ node -h
$ apm -v

Hope this helps someone else.

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0

open node.js command prompt
run this command

node -v

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0

You can simply do

node --version

or short form would also do

node -v

If above commands does not work, you have done something wrong in installation, reinstall the node.js and try.

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