Very brief question. I have a randomly sorted large string array (100K+ entries) where I want to find the first occurance of a desired string. I have two solutions.

From having read what I can my guess is that the 'for loop' is going to currently give slightly better performance (but this margin could always change), but I also find the linq version much more readable. On balance which method is generally considered current best coding practice and why?

string matchString = "dsf897sdf78";
int matchIndex = -1;
for(int i=0; i<array.length; i++)
{
    if(array[i]==matchString)
    {
        matchIndex = i;
        break;
    }
}

or

int matchIndex = array.Select((r, i) => new { value = r, index = i })
                         .Where(t => t.value == matchString)
                         .Select(s => s.index).First();
  • Related: for vs. foreach vs. LINQ – sloth Feb 15 '13 at 11:45
  • 3
    I wouldn't even use the LINQ in this case, since you really have to fight to find the index - I'd use Array.IndexOf :) – Rawling Feb 15 '13 at 11:46
  • I use LINQ on large datatables (100k+ records, ~40 columns) without any performance issue. – Teejay Feb 15 '13 at 11:47
  • 1
    @hometoast I do not use Linq2Sql. I use LINQ to search, group & filter a DataTable. And DataTable isn't always a SQL operation's result. – Teejay Feb 15 '13 at 11:59
  • retracted comment then. – hometoast Feb 15 '13 at 12:02
up vote 44 down vote accepted

The best practice depends on what you need:

  1. Development speed and maintainability: LINQ
  2. Performance (according to profiling tools): manual code

LINQ really does slow things down with all the indirection. Don't worry about it as 99% of your code does not impact end user performance.

I started with C++ and really learnt how to optimize a piece of code. LINQ is not suited to get the most out of your CPU. So if you measure a LINQ query to be a problem just ditch it. But only then.

For your code sample I'd estimate a 3x slowdown. The allocations (and subsequent GC!) and indirections through the lambdas really hurt.

  • Agreed. Linq comes at a small performance cost, but in many cases it's negligable. In fact, from what i recall most of the code behind StackOverflow uses Linq – Timothy Groote Feb 15 '13 at 11:43
  • +1 and want to add, that only 20% of code runs 80% of time, so only bottlenecks should be optimized if there is a performance problems – Sergey Berezovskiy Feb 15 '13 at 11:43
  • 1
    +1 the 99.9% straight good explanation :) – spajce Feb 15 '13 at 12:09
  • indirections through the lambdas really hurt I don't agree. Once the expression evaluated, JIT finds a way to avoid virtual function call overhead. – ozgur May 17 '16 at 8:55
  • 2
    @ozgur the JVM HotSpot compiler often can do that. The .NET JITs never devirtualize calls, often not even if the call target type is statically known. Delegate calls are not devirtualized under any circumstances. – usr May 19 '16 at 11:54

Slightly better performance? A loop will give SIGNIFICANTLY better performance!

Consider the code below. On my system for a RELEASE (not debug) build, it gives:

Found via loop at index 999999 in 00:00:00.2782047
Found via linq at index 999999 in 00:00:02.5864703
Loop was 9.29700432810805 times faster than linq.

The code is deliberately set up so that the item to be found is right at the end. If it was right at the start, things would be quite different.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Linq;

namespace Demo
{
    public static class Program
    {
        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string[] a = new string[1000000];

            for (int i = 0; i < a.Length; ++i)
            {
                a[i] = "Won't be found";
            }

            string matchString = "Will be found";

            a[a.Length - 1] = "Will be found";

            const int COUNT = 100;

            var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            int matchIndex = -1;

            for (int outer = 0; outer < COUNT; ++outer)
            {
                for (int i = 0; i < a.Length; i++)
                {
                    if (a[i] == matchString)
                    {
                        matchIndex = i;
                        break;
                    }
                }
            }

            sw.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("Found via loop at index " + matchIndex + " in " + sw.Elapsed);
            double loopTime = sw.Elapsed.TotalSeconds;

            sw.Restart();

            for (int outer = 0; outer < COUNT; ++outer)
            {
                matchIndex = a.Select((r, i) => new { value = r, index = i })
                             .Where(t => t.value == matchString)
                             .Select(s => s.index).First();
            }

            sw.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("Found via linq at index " + matchIndex + " in " + sw.Elapsed);
            double linqTime = sw.Elapsed.TotalSeconds;

            Console.WriteLine("Loop was {0} times faster than linq.", linqTime/loopTime);
        }
    }
}
  • 4
    +1 for the efforts :D – spajce Feb 15 '13 at 12:35
  • 2
    Problem is the new operator which slows the linq query down. If the array can be converted to a list than linq can be combined with FindIndex and this time the for loop is only around 1.5 times faster. 'matchIndex = a.ToList().FindIndex(x => x.Equals(matchString));' – JohnCambell May 8 '14 at 14:41
  • changing your query to something closer to the regular loop, reduces the difference dramatically: string tst = a.First(s => matchIndex++ !=-2 && s == matchString); – jmoreno Oct 6 '14 at 5:47
  • 3
    Dude! Your linq query is wrong! The correct one is the following and this one is less than 10% slower. matchIndex = a.Where(t => t == matchString).Select((r, i) => i).First(); – papadi Jun 17 '15 at 8:31
  • 1
    i used your sample and made some changes, changing string to List<string> and using a.IndexOf(a.Find(o => o == matchString)); made a difference. output became "Found via linq at index 999999 in 00:00:00.0221552" – jace Apr 12 '17 at 9:22

LINQ, according to declarative paradigm, expresses the logic of a computation without describing its control flow. The query is goal oriented, selfdescribing and thus easy to analyse and understand. Is also concise. Moreover, using LINQ, one depends highly upon abstraction of data structure. That involves high rate of maintanability and reusability.

Iteration aproach addresses imperative paradigm. It gives fine-grained control, thus ease obtain higher performance. The code is also simpler to debug. Sometimes well contructed iteration is more readable than query.

Well, you gave the answer to your question yourself.

Go with a For loop if you want the best performance, or go with Linq if you want readability.

Also perhaps keep in mind the possibility of using Parallel.Foreach() which would benefit from in-line lambda expressions (so, more closer to Linq), and that is much more readable then doing paralelization "manually".

  • 1
    I have always wondered why LINQ and lambda expressions are automatically considered more readable. Sometimes a simple foreach or for is more readable than LINQ IMO – Lee Dale Feb 15 '13 at 11:46
  • @LeeDale of course. And i would like to add my answer was regarding the Fluent-style layout of Linq, like in the question, not the declarative style. – dutzu Feb 15 '13 at 11:50

There is always dilemma between performance and maintainability. And usually (if there is no specific requirements about performance) maintainability should win. Only if you have performance problems, then you should profile application, find problem source, and improve its performance (by reducing maintainability at same time, yes that's the world we live in).

About your sample. Linq is not very good solution here, because it do not add match maintainability into your code. Actually for me projecting, filtering, and projecting again looks even worse, than simple loop. What you need here is simple Array.IndexOf, which is more maintainable, than loop, and have almost same performance:

Array.IndexOf(array, matchString)

I don't think either is considered best practice some people prefer looking at LINQ and some don't.

If performance is a issue the I would profile both bits of code for your scenario and if the difference is negligible then go with the one you feel more conformable with, after all it will most likely be you who maintains the code.

Also have you thought about using PLINQ or making the loop run in parallel?

  • +1 for the PLINQ :D – spajce Feb 15 '13 at 12:13

The Best Option Is To Use IndexOf method of Array Class. Since it is specialized for arrays it will b significantly faster than both Linq and For Loop. Improving on Matt Watsons Answer.

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Linq;


namespace PerformanceConsoleApp
{
    public class LinqVsFor
    {

        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string[] a = new string[1000000];

            for (int i = 0; i < a.Length; ++i)
            {
                a[i] = "Won't be found";
            }

            string matchString = "Will be found";

            a[a.Length - 1] = "Will be found";

            const int COUNT = 100;

            var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();

            Loop(a, matchString, COUNT, sw);

            First(a, matchString, COUNT, sw);


            Where(a, matchString, COUNT, sw);

            IndexOf(a, sw, matchString, COUNT);

            Console.ReadLine();
        }

        private static void Loop(string[] a, string matchString, int COUNT, Stopwatch sw)
        {
            int matchIndex = -1;
            for (int outer = 0; outer < COUNT; ++outer)
            {
                for (int i = 0; i < a.Length; i++)
                {
                    if (a[i] == matchString)
                    {
                        matchIndex = i;
                        break;
                    }
                }
            }

            sw.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("Found via loop at index " + matchIndex + " in " + sw.Elapsed);

        }

        private static void IndexOf(string[] a, Stopwatch sw, string matchString, int COUNT)
        {
            int matchIndex = -1;
            sw.Restart();
            for (int outer = 0; outer < COUNT; ++outer)
            {
                matchIndex = Array.IndexOf(a, matchString);
            }
            sw.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("Found via IndexOf at index " + matchIndex + " in " + sw.Elapsed);

        }

        private static void First(string[] a, string matchString, int COUNT, Stopwatch sw)
        {
            sw.Restart();
            string str = "";
            for (int outer = 0; outer < COUNT; ++outer)
            {
                str = a.First(t => t == matchString);

            }
            sw.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("Found via linq First at index " + Array.IndexOf(a, str) + " in " + sw.Elapsed);

        }

        private static void Where(string[] a, string matchString, int COUNT, Stopwatch sw)
        {
            sw.Restart();
            string str = "";
            for (int outer = 0; outer < COUNT; ++outer)
            {
                str = a.Where(t => t == matchString).First();

            }
            sw.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("Found via linq Where at index " + Array.IndexOf(a, str) + " in " + sw.Elapsed);

        }

    }

}

Output:

Found via loop at index 999999 in 00:00:01.1528531
Found via linq First at index 999999 in 00:00:02.0876573
Found via linq Where at index 999999 in 00:00:01.3313111
Found via IndexOf at index 999999 in 00:00:00.7244812

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