-1

I have this binary number
This is 32 bit binary number 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 xxxx yyyy
Every 0000 let's call a "nibble" .
Thus I have the words:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Now
I want to check whether in the last bit of 6th word I have 1 or 0

0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0001 xxxx yyyy or
0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 xxxx yyyy

If I have 1 I want to obtain from given 32 bit binary number this number
1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111
otherwise I want to obtain this number
0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
How to do it??? Thanks much in advance!!!

3
  • 2
    Just FYI, groups of 4 bits are called "nibbles".
    – Michael F
    Commented Feb 15, 2013 at 12:19
  • What processor you are targeting?
    – nrz
    Commented Feb 15, 2013 at 12:23
  • I want to understand how matematically to perform it
    – XXXXX
    Commented Feb 15, 2013 at 13:02

1 Answer 1

1

For example, -(x >> 8) First shift the bit down to LSB (mask the rest if they may be non-zero). You now have 1 or 0. Knowing that -1 in 2's complement is all 1 bits, you just have to negate the value (note this isn't bitwise negation).

6
  • "negate the value " what do you mean?
    – XXXXX
    Commented Feb 15, 2013 at 13:26
  • You know, 2's complement arithmetic negation. Negative numbers? The - operator? If you don't have that, you can do bitwise negation and add one.
    – Jester
    Commented Feb 15, 2013 at 13:28
  • The problem is that I want to do the same operations and it one case obtain all 0's in other obtain all ones. I have 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0001 xxxx yyyy, after (>>8) I obtain 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0001; I negate, and add 1 then i obtain all 1's
    – XXXXX
    Commented Feb 15, 2013 at 13:31
  • but if I have 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 xxxx yyy,how to perform the same operations and remain the value?
    – XXXXX
    Commented Feb 15, 2013 at 13:35
  • 1
    What's your problem? If you shift 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 xxxx yyy you obtain all 0, if you bitwise negate it's all 1, if you add 1 you get back all 0. That's what you want, isn't it.
    – Jester
    Commented Feb 15, 2013 at 13:43

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