64

I have this:

>>> a = [1, 2, 4]
>>> print a
[1, 2, 4]

>>> print a.insert(2, 3)
None

>>> print a
[1, 2, 3, 4]

>>> b = a.insert(3, 6)
>>> print b
None

>>> print a
[1, 2, 3, 6, 4]

Is there anyway I can get the updated list as result, instead of updating the original list in place?

  • 9
    b = a[:].insert(2,3) seems pretty short, doesn't affect the original list and is pretty descriptive. – mkoistinen Jun 26 '14 at 19:21
  • 4
    @mkoistinen It doesn't work for me. >>> a = [1, 2, 3, 4] >>> b = a[:].insert(2, 5) >>> print b None – SparkAndShine Nov 29 '15 at 1:11
65

l.insert(index, obj) doesn't actually return anything, it just updates the list. As ATO said, you can do b = a[:index] + [obj] + a[index:]. However, another way is:

a = [1, 2, 4]
b = a[:]
b.insert(2, 3)
  • 4
    I want to reduce the number of lines... – ATOzTOA Feb 16 '13 at 0:54
  • 47
    If you can't tolerate 3 lines of readable code, put it in a function and call it. – IceArdor Aug 1 '14 at 21:06
  • 10
    This solution still updates the a list in place. To avoid it, change the order of lines: b=a[:]; b.insert(2,3) – Antony Hatchkins Nov 14 '16 at 7:35
30

Shortest I got: b = a[:2] + [3] + a[2:]

>>> 
>>> a = [1, 2, 4]
>>> print a
[1, 2, 4]
>>> b = a[:2] + [3] + a[2:]
>>> print a
[1, 2, 4]
>>> print b
[1, 2, 3, 4]
28

Most Performance Efficient approach

You may also insert the element using the slice indexing in the list. For example:

>>> a = [1, 2, 4]
>>> insert_at = 2  # index at which you want to insert item

>>> b = a[:]   # created copy of list "a" as "b"
               # skip this step if you are ok with modifying original list

>>> b[insert_at:insert_at] = [3]  # insert "3" within "b"
>>> b
[1, 2, 3, 4]

For inserting multiple elements together at a given index, all you need to do is to use a list of multiple elements that you want to insert. For example:

>>> a = [1, 2, 4]
>>> insert_at = 2   # index starting from which multiple elements will be inserted 

# List of elements that you want to insert together at "index_at" (above) position
>>> insert_elements = [3, 5, 6]

>>> a[insert_at:insert_at] = insert_elements
>>> a   # [3, 5, 6] are inserted together in `a` starting at index "2"
[1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 4]

Alternative using List Comprehension (but very slow in terms of performance):

As an alternative, it can be achieved using list comprehension with enumerate too. (But please don't do it this way. It is just for illustration):

>>> a = [1, 2, 4]
>>> insert_at = 2

>>> b = [y for i, x in enumerate(a) for y in ((3, x) if i == insert_at else (x, ))]
>>> b
[1, 2, 3, 4]

Performance Comparison of all solutions

Here's the timeit comparison of all the answers with list of 1000 elements for Python 3.4.5:

  • Mine answer using sliced insertion - Fastest (3.08 usec per loop)

    mquadri$ python3 -m timeit -s "a = list(range(1000))" "b = a[:]; b[500:500] = [3]"
    100000 loops, best of 3: 3.08 usec per loop
    
  • ATOzTOA's accepted answer based on merge of sliced lists - Second (6.71 usec per loop)

    mquadri$ python3 -m timeit -s "a = list(range(1000))" "b = a[:500] + [3] + a[500:]"
    100000 loops, best of 3: 6.71 usec per loop
    
  • Rushy Panchal's answer with most votes using list.insert(...)- Third (26.5 usec per loop)

    python3 -m timeit -s "a = list(range(1000))" "b = a[:]; b.insert(500, 3)"
    10000 loops, best of 3: 26.5 usec per loop
    
  • Mine answer with List Comprehension and enumerate - Fourth (very slow with 168 usec per loop)

    mquadri$ python3 -m timeit -s "a = list(range(1000))" "[y for i, x in enumerate(a) for y in ((3, x) if i == 500 else (x, )) ]"
    10000 loops, best of 3: 168 usec per loop
    
  • 1
    I really like this result because it easily extends to solve the problem, what if I want to insert the values 3, 3.5 into that list (in order) -> a[2:2] = [3,3.5]. Very neat – minillinim Jan 15 '18 at 1:00
  • How does a[2:2] = a_list works? a[2:2] is basically starting from 2nd index to 1st index(2-1) but in forward direction which means an empty [] list . How does it extend? If we do [2:3:-1] it does not work. – SamCodes Sep 28 '18 at 20:24
-3

Use the Python list insert() Method. Usage:

Syntax

Following is the syntax for insert() method −

list.insert(index, obj)

Parameters

  • index − This is the Index where the object obj need to be inserted.
  • obj − This is the Object to be inserted into the given list.

Return Value

This method does not return any value but it inserts the given element at the given index.

Example:

a = [1,2,4,5]

a.insert(2,3)

print(a)

Returns [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

  • 1
    This does not answer the question. – Gustav Bertram Jan 9 '18 at 8:56
  • 3
    Question was specific: Is there anyway I can get the updated list as result, instead of updating the original list in place? Your answer does the opposite. – Laszlowaty Jan 10 '18 at 10:03

protected by Moinuddin Quadri Jan 12 '18 at 12:07

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