6

Just out of curiosity, why does the compiler treat an unconstrained generic type any differently than it would typeof(object)?

class Bar { }

class Foo
{
    void foo(object thing)
    {
        ((Bar)thing).ToString();
    }
}

class Foo<T>
{
    void foo(T thing)
    {
        ((Bar)thing).ToString();
    }
}

In the above, casting "T thing" to Bar results in a compiler error. Casting "object thing" to Bar however is something the compiler lets me do, at my own risk of course.

What I don't see is why. In .net object after all is a catch-all and the run-time type could be a boxed value or an object of any type. So I don't see what logical reason there is for the compiler to differentiate between the two cases. The best I can do is something like "the programmer would expect the compiler to do type checking with generic types, but not with object". :) Is that all there is to it?

Btw, I am aware that I can still get my cast done in the Foo case, by simply writing

((Bar)(object)thing).ToString();

I just want to understand why the compiler does this...

  • 3
    Is it compile time legal for you to cast int to Bar? When you fill in that type parameter with int, should it then start to have compiler errors? What if the assembly is not yours, so you can't see the problem? T is not object. It's something incredibly specific. – Anthony Pegram Feb 15 '13 at 14:12
  • 1
    Are you also aware you can say class Foo<T> where T : Bar to ensure that T can always be cast to Bar? – Rawling Feb 15 '13 at 14:12
  • 1
    I'm sure Eric Lippert has a blog post about this somewhere, but I can't find it... – Jon Skeet Feb 15 '13 at 14:13
  • 3
    The problem you are having is that you think T means anything, when it actually means something very specific, but it isn't yet specified. – siride Feb 15 '13 at 14:19
  • Since casting a boxed value type to any reference type will result in an error, surely the real issue is that there's no (general) way for the compiler to distinguish between a boxed value type and a reference type; because surely if it could, it would raise a compile-time error for such casts from object, even in the absence of generics. – Damien_The_Unbeliever Feb 15 '13 at 14:23
4

The significance here is object. If the first example was anything other than object it would behave the same. Basically, what you are saying at the moment here:

(Bar)thing

is: "convert a T to a Bar"; which is nowhere near legal in the general case. By adding object you make it:

(Bar)(object)thing

which is "convert a T to an object..." - which is always legal, since object is the root of all managed types; and note this may invove a box - "...and then cast the object as a Bar" - again; it is always legal at compile time, and involves a type-check ("unbox-any") at runtime.

For example: suppose T is DateTime...

DateTime thing = ...
Bar bar = (Bar)(object)thing;

is perfectly valid; sure it'll fail at runtime, but: this is the scenario you need to keep in mind.

  • While correct I think the OP was asking for the design decision behind the choice to expose the error at compile time for the latter case but at run time for the former (assuming thing is not convertible to Bar. – Ron Warholic Feb 15 '13 at 14:17
  • You're both (@Marc, @Ron) spot on. I think this is a good explanation. Casting object to something is always a downcast, to something more specific, but the general case can be either, and hence the constructed type would not compile for any T - which is a good reason to give a compile-time error! – The Dag Feb 22 '13 at 16:24
4

It comes down the the semantics and purpose of creating generics. If you have a general type T, the compiler won't let you arbitrarily cast it directly to any other object. This makes sense as the purpose of T is to force the programmer to specify what type T actually is. It's not going to be "object", it's going to be a specific TYPE of object. At compile time, the compiler cannot know what is going to be in T and therefore cannot cast it.

Casting from object works as it's an anonymous object - as oppose to a KNOWN object type that gets defined in its usage.

This can be extended with the "where" clause. E.g., you can specify that T must be of type IBar;

interface IBar { }

class Bar : IBar { }

class Foo<T>
    where T : IBar
{
    void foo(T thing)
    {
        ((IBar)thing).ToString();
    }
}

Inheritance also works with the where clause;

class Bar { }

class Foo<T>
    where T : Bar
{
    void foo(T thing)
    {
        // now you don't need to cast at all as the compiler knows
        // exactly what type T is (at a parent level at least)
        thing.ToString();
    }
}
  • I'm happy to mark this as answer, though I find your reasoning amounts to little more than my original suggestion; it really does boil down to the expectations of the "user" (user of my generic class that is, or rather a constructed class where T has been defined). To say that "T isn't just an object, it's something specific" is, IMHO, superflous. Any object can be, and usually is, something very specific. And there are different ways to view the same object. I may want to support any type, but behave in a particular way if the type is one I know, for example - generic class or not. – The Dag Feb 22 '13 at 16:22
  • @TheDag Changing the behaviour of a generic based on the type T is generally not a good idea although there are valid cases for handling specific types, e.g., boxed or unboxed types. In your example, you try to go directly from T which by default is almost certainly going to be a specific type to another specific type Bar. This would be aking to trying to do (Foo)Bar when there is no relationship or common interface. I still think the compiler warning is a valid one – DiskJunky Feb 22 '13 at 16:29

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