172

What is a very efficient way of determining how many digits there are in an integer in C++?

9
  • 14
    In what base? 2? 10? Commented Sep 28, 2009 at 23:20
  • 4
    I would like to do it in base 10
    – Seth
    Commented Sep 28, 2009 at 23:25
  • 1
    I once asked a related question: How can you get the first digit in an int? Many of the same methodologies as below were used in people's answers. Here's the link in case it's relevant to your task [stackoverflow.com/questions/701322/]
    – Dinah
    Commented Sep 28, 2009 at 23:52
  • 1
    While all these answers are in terms of base 10, it is pretty easy to change to compute the result for any desired base.
    – Ira Baxter
    Commented Sep 30, 2009 at 0:43
  • 2
    What's your measure of efficiency? Options include minimising code size, number of CPU cycles, even accuracy of result. But each involves doing things differently. And, do you mean decimal digit, octal digit, hexadecimal digit, or something else?
    – Peter
    Commented Jan 30, 2016 at 0:53

33 Answers 33

124

Well, the most efficient way, presuming you know the size of the integer, would be a lookup. Should be faster than the much shorter logarithm based approach. If you don't care about counting the '-', remove the + 1.

#include <climits>

// generic solution
template <class T>
int numDigits(T number)
{
    int digits = 0;
    if (number < 0) digits = 1; // remove this line if '-' counts as a digit
    while (number) {
        number /= 10;
        digits++;
    }
    return digits;
}

// partial specialization optimization for 64-bit numbers
template <>
int numDigits(int64_t x) {
    if (x == INT64_MIN) return 19 + 1;
    if (x < 0) return digits(-x) + 1;

    if (x >= 10000000000) {
        if (x >= 100000000000000) {
            if (x >= 10000000000000000) {
                if (x >= 100000000000000000) {
                    if (x >= 1000000000000000000)
                        return 19;
                    return 18;
                }
                return 17;
            }
            if (x >= 1000000000000000)
                return 16;
            return 15;
        } 
        if (x >= 1000000000000) {
            if (x >= 10000000000000)
                return 14;
            return 13;
        }
        if (x >= 100000000000)
            return 12;
        return 11;
    }
    if (x >= 100000) {
        if (x >= 10000000) {
            if (x >= 100000000) {
                if (x >= 1000000000)
                    return 10;
                return 9;
            }
            return 8;
        }
        if (x >= 1000000)
            return 7;
        return 6;
    }
    if (x >= 100) {
        if (x >= 1000) {
            if (x >= 10000)
                return 5;
            return 4;
        }
        return 3;
    }
    if (x >= 10)
        return 2;
    return 1;
}

// partial specialization optimization for 32-bit numbers
template<>
int numDigits(int32_t x)
{
    if (x == INT32_MIN) return 10 + 1;
    if (x < 0) return numDigits(-x) + 1;

    if (x >= 10000) {
        if (x >= 10000000) {
            if (x >= 100000000) {
                if (x >= 1000000000)
                    return 10;
                return 9;
            }
            return 8;
        }
        if (x >= 100000) {
            if (x >= 1000000)
                return 7;
            return 6;
        }
        return 5;
    }
    if (x >= 100) {
        if (x >= 1000)
            return 4;
        return 3;
    }
    if (x >= 10)
        return 2;
    return 1;
}

// partial-specialization optimization for 8-bit numbers
template <>
int numDigits(char n)
{
    // if you have the time, replace this with a static initialization to avoid
    // the initial overhead & unnecessary branch
    static char x[256] = {0};
    if (x[0] == 0) {
        for (char c = 1; c != 0; c++)
            x[c] = numDigits((int32_t)c);
        x[0] = 1;
    }
    return x[n];
}
14
  • 5
    Probably faster than my answer, well done. For added efficiency, if you know that your input numbers will be mostly small ones (I'm guessing less than 100,000), then reverse the tests: if (x < 10) return 1; if (x < 100) return 2; etc., so that the function will do less tests and exit faster.
    – user42690
    Commented Sep 28, 2009 at 23:44
  • 36
    Or perhaps reorder and nest the if statements, to do a binary search instead of a linear search.
    – dave4420
    Commented Sep 28, 2009 at 23:44
  • 1
    That's not a good idea. What happens when the architecture expands to 256 bit integers. You need to remember to come back and modify this code. In real life that will not happen and sice this is probably going to be used to build a buffer of the correct size you are now opening yourself to all sorts of buffer over run problems on larger architectres. Commented Sep 29, 2009 at 0:51
  • 3
    assuming a uniform distribution of numbers, the reverse linear search ( starting from max digits to 1 ) may be faster on average than the binary search as there are quite more numbers with N digits than with N-1 digits graphics.stanford.edu/~seander/…
    – fa.
    Commented Sep 29, 2009 at 12:27
  • 6
    I wouldn't worry very hard about 256 or 128 bit integers. Unless you need to count the number of electrons in the Universe (10^78 last time I did it), 64 bits will do pretty well. 32 bit machines lasted ~~15 years. I'd guess 64 bit machines will last a lot longer. For larger number, multiprecision arithmetic will be fine, and I doubt if efficiency of computing digit count will matter.
    – Ira Baxter
    Commented Sep 30, 2009 at 9:26
86

The simplest way is to do:

unsigned GetNumberOfDigits (unsigned i)
{
    return i > 0 ? (int) log10 ((double) i) + 1 : 1;
}

log10 is defined in <cmath> or <math.h>. You'd need to profile this to see if it's faster than any of the others posted here. I'm not sure how robust this is with regards to float point precision. Also, the argument is unsigned as negative values and log don't really mix.

5
  • 9
    For 32 bit ints and 56 bit floats, this probably works. If the input is a long (64 bits), the 56 bits of double-precision log may cause this to produce the wrong answer in cases of values near large values of 10^n. Expect trouble above 2^50.
    – Ira Baxter
    Commented Sep 29, 2009 at 10:07
  • 1
    There's also the question of how accurate the log functions are. I haven't checked how accurate they are in modern libraries, and wouldn't be comfortable blindly trusting them to be good to one part in a billion. Commented Sep 29, 2009 at 13:49
  • @DavidThornley: log or other math functions are perfectly precise unless specified on the compiler command line. some will be converted to x86 intrinsics at compile time. some don't exist and will expand into formulas of existing intrinsics. for example if using -fpfast you could see usage of SSE instrinsics rather than x87, which yields less guarantee on the precision IIRC. but by default no problem.
    – v.oddou
    Commented Nov 18, 2014 at 3:07
  • @DavidThornley: It's more than precision. The question is whether it is guaranteed or not that log10 (10^k) ≥ k for all relevant k. That is is it guaranteed that any inevitable rounding error goes in the right direction. k + eps as a result works, k - eps doesn't. And "Perfectly precise" is naïve.
    – gnasher729
    Commented Aug 1, 2015 at 8:26
  • 1
    The test i > 0 could be optimized to i > 9
    – Pat
    Commented Jan 20, 2017 at 13:36
79

Perhaps I misunderstood the question but doesn't this do it?

int NumDigits(int x)  
{  
    x = abs(x);  
    return (x < 10 ? 1 :   
        (x < 100 ? 2 :   
        (x < 1000 ? 3 :   
        (x < 10000 ? 4 :   
        (x < 100000 ? 5 :   
        (x < 1000000 ? 6 :   
        (x < 10000000 ? 7 :  
        (x < 100000000 ? 8 :  
        (x < 1000000000 ? 9 :  
        10)))))))));  
}  
5
  • 39
    And I wouldn't be surprised if this solution will be the fastest.
    – VisioN
    Commented Nov 14, 2014 at 15:10
  • @VisioN It seems like the accepted answer is ~1.7 times faster @ quick-bench so the binary tree thingy to keep the comparisons down seems to work (if the input is uniformly distributed over the whole range).
    – Ted Lyngmo
    Commented Jun 3, 2022 at 14:52
  • @TedLyngmo Probably, x = abs(x) gives extra weight here.
    – VisioN
    Commented Jun 6, 2022 at 22:12
  • 1
    @VisioN True. The function in the accepted answer calls itself for negative numbers and adds 1. Since the functions under test didn't do the same thing for negative numbers, I removed negative numbers and made the type std::uint_fast32_t in both functions.
    – Ted Lyngmo
    Commented Jun 7, 2022 at 3:11
  • i like that with C++ the closer you get to literally spelling out what the machine should do, the better off you are speed wise. Commented Apr 9 at 23:56
35
int digits = 0; while (number != 0) { number /= 10; digits++; }

Note: "0" will have 0 digits! If you need 0 to appear to have 1 digit, use:

int digits = 0; do { number /= 10; digits++; } while (number != 0);

(Thanks Kevin Fegan)

In the end, use a profiler to know which of all the answers here will be faster on your machine...

2
  • 3
    This may or may not be faster than the unrolled loop approach I took - you'd need to profile the difference (should be negligible in the long run).
    – Vitali
    Commented Sep 28, 2009 at 23:43
  • Agreed, profiling is the only way to really know for sure! I updated my answer with that comment, as Ben S's ceil(log10()) answer has disappeared.
    – user42690
    Commented Sep 28, 2009 at 23:49
15

convert to string and then use built-in functions

unsigned int i;
cout<< to_string(i).length()<<endl;
0
11

Practical joke: This is the most efficient way (number of digits is calculated at compile-time):

template <unsigned long long N, size_t base=10>
struct numberlength
{
    enum { value = 1 + numberlength<N/base, base>::value };
};

template <size_t base>
struct numberlength<0, base>
{
    enum { value = 0 };
};

May be useful to determine the width required for number field in formatting, input elements etc.

4
  • 6
    First, your solution doesn't work for 0. Secondly your solution is inapplicable to the general case of a variable. Thirdly, if you are using a constant literal, you already know how many digits it has.
    – Vitali
    Commented Sep 29, 2009 at 8:02
  • It works for 0 too. It also works for any base. The rest are valid points that I already outlined. Commented Sep 29, 2009 at 13:10
  • 4
    I don't think it does actually. It fails on 0 and also fails on base 1 :) and gives divide by zero errors if the base is given as 0. It can be fixed though. Anyway I'm nitpicking over a very old post, so sorry, it's just that I think this needn't be a joke and could actually be useful.
    – tjm
    Commented Oct 7, 2010 at 17:46
  • I provided here a C++20 version which works with 0 stackoverflow.com/a/72587882/3153229
    – Vegeta
    Commented Jun 11, 2022 at 21:19
10

See Bit Twiddling Hacks for a much shorter version of the answer you accepted. It also has the benefit of finding the answer sooner if your input is normally distributed, by checking the big constants first. (v >= 1000000000) catches 76% of the values, so checking that first will on average be faster.

5
  • It's unclear if the bit-twiddling is actually faster. Even in the worst case, my modified approach requires 4 comparisons (might be able to take it down to 3 if I examined the partitioning further, although that looks unlikely). I seriously doubt that that is going to be beat by arithmetic operations + memory loads (although if accessed enough, those disappear into the CPU cache). Remember, in the example they give, they also hide the log base 2 as some abstract IntegerLogBase2 function (which itself is actually not cheap).
    – Vitali
    Commented Sep 29, 2009 at 8:14
  • Just as a follow up, yes if the numbers are normally distributed, doing the in-order check is faster. However, it has the degenerate case of being twice as slow in the worst case. The partitioned approach by number of digits instead of input space means that the behaviour does not have a degenerate case and always performs optimally. Furthermore, remember you are making the assumption that the numbers will be uniformly distributed. In fact, they are more likely to follow some distribution related to <a href="en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…> would be my guess.
    – Vitali
    Commented Sep 29, 2009 at 8:19
  • The bit twiddling hacks are not faster than the partition method above, but they are potentially interesting if you had a more general case like a float here.
    – Corwin Joy
    Commented Sep 30, 2009 at 8:25
  • 1
    The bit twiddling hacks suggests a way to get the int log10, given the int log2. It suggests several way to get int log2, mostly involving few compare/branches. (I think you're underestimating the cost of unpredictable branches, Vitali). If you can use inline x86 asm, the BSR instruction will give you the int log2 of a value (i.e. the bit index of a the most significant set bit). It's a bit slow on K8 (10 cycle latency), but fast on Core 2 (2 or 3 cycle latency). Even on K8, may well be faster than the comparisons. Commented Dec 6, 2009 at 0:08
  • On K10, lzcnt counts leading zeros, so it's almost the same as bsr, but an input of 0 is no longer a special case with undefined results. Latencies: BSR: 4, LZCNT: 2. Commented Dec 6, 2009 at 0:30
8
int x = 1000;
int numberOfDigits = x ? static_cast<int>(log10(abs(x))) + 1 : 1;
2
  • 4
    While this is efficient in terms of LOCs, as noted in the accepted answer use of log will probably not give the best performance.
    – Ian
    Commented Jul 4, 2018 at 1:07
  • 1
    @Ian Why not? It's only a couple of FPU instructions. Miles better than all the branches and loops in other answers.
    – user207421
    Commented Mar 30, 2020 at 0:16
7

A previous poster suggested a loop that divides by 10. Since multiplies on modern machines are a lot faster, I'd recommend the following code instead:

 int digits = 1, pten=10; while ( pten <= number ) { digits++; pten*=10; }
7
  • 1
    the devil is in the details - what happens with say std::numeric_limits<int>::max == number - it might have a problem terminating
    – pgast
    Commented Sep 29, 2009 at 2:53
  • 2
    If you are worried about that case, you can add one additional IF to handle very large values.
    – Ira Baxter
    Commented Sep 29, 2009 at 3:46
  • 2
    I should observe that on x86 machines, a multiply by a constant 10 as used in this case can actually be implemented by the compiler as LEA R2,[8*R1+R1], ADD R1,R2 so it takes 2 clocks max. Multiplys by variables take tens of clocks, and divides are much worse.
    – Ira Baxter
    Commented Sep 29, 2009 at 10:19
  • the advantage with the divide approach is that you dont need to worry about negative numbers. Commented Jan 14, 2013 at 9:32
  • 2
    I benchmarked the multipication approach (with a fabs to remove the sign issue) versus the division approach. On my machine the division approach is factor 2 slower than the multiplication approach. Whether this is premature optimization or not really depends on where and how this is called.
    – Spacemoose
    Commented Apr 8, 2014 at 7:58
5

The ppc architecture has a bit counting instruction. With that, you can determine the log base 2 of a positive integer in a single instruction. For example, 32 bit would be:

#define log_2_32_ppc(x) (31-__cntlzw(x))

If you can handle a small margin of error on large values you can convert that to log base 10 with another few instructions:

#define log_10_estimate_32_ppc(x) (9-(((__cntlzw(x)*1233)+1545)>>12))

This is platform specific and slightly inaccurate, but also involves no branches, division or conversion to floating point. All depends on what you need.

I only know the ppc instructions off hand, but other architectures should have similar instructions.

2
  • This solution computes log2(15)= 4 bits and log2(9)=4 bits. But 15 and 9 require different numbers of decimal digits to print. So it doesn't work, unless you don't mind your numbers printing with too many digits sometimes. But in that case, you can always choose "10" as the answer for int.
    – Ira Baxter
    Commented Sep 29, 2009 at 11:05
  • Wow, an approximate function. Nice.
    – doug65536
    Commented Jan 25, 2013 at 2:59
4
 #include <iostream>
 #include <math.h>

 using namespace std;

 int main()
 {
     double num;
     int result;
     cout<<"Enter a number to find the number of digits,  not including decimal places: ";
     cin>>num;
     result = ((num<=1)? 1 : log10(num)+1);
     cout<<"Number of digits "<<result<<endl;
     return 0;
 }

This is probably the simplest way of solving your problem, assuming you only care about digits before the decimal and assuming anything less than 10 is just 1 digit.

4

You can use this to calculate the number of digits on compile time:

C++20 solution:

template<std::integral auto num>
constexpr int number_of_digits = num >= -9 && num <= 9 ? 1 : 1 + number_of_digits<num / 10>;

Works for negative numbers, zero and positive numbers.

Note: to make it work with C++14 change "std::integral auto" to "long long".

Note: if you want the minus sign in negative numbers to also be counted, then change -9 to 0;

Usage example:

int k = number_of_digits<101>; // k = 3

The way this works is that a number is going to be divided by 10 recursively until it becomes a single digit, in which case we finish by adding +1 to the total sum.

1
  • Interesting! Will this works for float and double too? My problem is I have do count digits for float, FLOAT_MIN/MAX has a mantisse of 64! Most implantations fails in other implantations.
    – Tom Tom
    Commented Apr 7, 2023 at 12:22
3

If faster is more efficient, this is a improvement on andrei alexandrescu's improvement. His version was already faster than the naive way (dividing by 10 at every digit). The version below is constant time and faster at least on x86-64 and ARM for all sizes, but occupies twice as much binary code, so it is not as cache-friendly.

Benchmarks for this version vs alexandrescu's version on my PR on facebook folly.

Works on unsigned, not signed.

inline uint32_t digits10(uint64_t v) {
  return  1
        + (std::uint32_t)(v>=10)
        + (std::uint32_t)(v>=100)
        + (std::uint32_t)(v>=1000)
        + (std::uint32_t)(v>=10000)
        + (std::uint32_t)(v>=100000)
        + (std::uint32_t)(v>=1000000)
        + (std::uint32_t)(v>=10000000)
        + (std::uint32_t)(v>=100000000)
        + (std::uint32_t)(v>=1000000000)
        + (std::uint32_t)(v>=10000000000ull)
        + (std::uint32_t)(v>=100000000000ull)
        + (std::uint32_t)(v>=1000000000000ull)
        + (std::uint32_t)(v>=10000000000000ull)
        + (std::uint32_t)(v>=100000000000000ull)
        + (std::uint32_t)(v>=1000000000000000ull)
        + (std::uint32_t)(v>=10000000000000000ull)
        + (std::uint32_t)(v>=100000000000000000ull)
        + (std::uint32_t)(v>=1000000000000000000ull)
        + (std::uint32_t)(v>=10000000000000000000ull);
}
1

I like Ira Baxter's answer. Here is a template variant that handles the various sizes and deals with the maximum integer values (updated to hoist the upper bound check out of the loop):

#include <boost/integer_traits.hpp>

template<typename T> T max_decimal()
{
    T t = 1;

    for (unsigned i = boost::integer_traits<T>::digits10; i; --i)
        t *= 10;

    return t;
}

template<typename T>
unsigned digits(T v)
{
    if (v < 0) v = -v;

    if (max_decimal<T>() <= v)
        return boost::integer_traits<T>::digits10 + 1;

    unsigned digits = 1;
    T boundary = 10;

    while (boundary <= v) {
        boundary *= 10;
        ++digits;
    }

    return digits;
}

To actually get the improved performance from hoisting the additional test out of the loop, you need to specialise max_decimal() to return constants for each type on your platform. A sufficiently magic compiler could optimise the call to max_decimal() to a constant, but specialisation is better with most compilers today. As it stands, this version is probably slower because max_decimal costs more than the tests removed from the loop.

I'll leave all that as an exercise for the reader.

3
  • You want to make the upper limit check a seperate conditional tested first so you don't check it on each loop iteration.
    – Ira Baxter
    Commented Sep 29, 2009 at 10:24
  • You don't want to put 10 into that temp t. The compiler might consider multiplying by t to be multiplying by a real variable, and use a general purpose multiply instruction. If you instead wrote "result*=10;" the compiler will surely notice the multiply by constant 10 and implement that with a few shifts and adds, which is extremely fast.
    – Ira Baxter
    Commented Sep 30, 2009 at 0:48
  • If the multiplication by t was always a multiplication by 10, then yes, the compiler could do strength reduction. However, t is not loop-invariant in this case (it is just a modification of an integer power function I had lying around). The correct optimisation is specialisation on type returning a constant. However, you are right that, in this case, the function is always raising 10 to a power, not an arbitrary integer to a power, and strength reduction gives a good win. So I made a change ... This time further changes really are left as an exercise! (Stack Overflow is a big time sink ...)
    – janm
    Commented Sep 30, 2009 at 7:07
1
#include <stdint.h> // uint32_t [available since C99]

/// Determine the number of digits for a 32 bit integer.
/// - Uses at most 4 comparisons.
/// - (cX) 2014 [email protected]
/// - \see http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1489830/#27669966
/**  #d == Number length vs Number of comparisons == #c
     \code
         #d | #c   #d | #c
         ---+---   ---+---
         10 | 4     5 | 4
          9 | 4     4 | 4
          8 | 3     3 | 3
          7 | 3     2 | 3
          6 | 3     1 | 3
     \endcode
*/
unsigned NumDigits32bs(uint32_t x) {
    return // Num-># Digits->[0-9] 32->bits bs->Binary Search
    ( x >= 100000u // [6-10] [1-5]
    ?   // [6-10]
        ( x >= 10000000u // [8-10] [6-7]
        ?   // [8-10]
            ( x >= 100000000u // [9-10] [8]
            ? // [9-10]
                ( x >=  1000000000u // [10] [9]
                ?   10
                :    9
                )
            : 8
            )
        :   // [6-7]
            ( x >=  1000000u // [7] [6]
            ?   7
            :   6
            )
        )
    :   // [1-5]
        ( x >= 100u // [3-5] [1-2]
        ?   // [3-5]
            ( x >= 1000u // [4-5] [3]
            ? // [4-5]
                ( x >=  10000u // [5] [4]
                ?   5
                :   4
                )
            : 3
            )
        :   // [1-2]
            ( x >=  10u // [2] [1]
            ?   2
            :   1
            )
        )
    );
}
0
1
/// Determine the number of digits for a 64 bit integer.
/// - Uses at most 5 comparisons.
/// - (cX) 2014 [email protected]
/// - \see http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1489830/#27670035
/**  #d == Number length vs Number of comparisons == #c
     \code
         #d | #c   #d | #c     #d | #c   #d | #c
         ---+---   ---+---     ---+---   ---+---
         20 | 5    15 | 5      10 | 5     5 | 5
         19 | 5    14 | 5       9 | 5     4 | 5
         18 | 4    13 | 4       8 | 4     3 | 4
         17 | 4    12 | 4       7 | 4     2 | 4
         16 | 4    11 | 4       6 | 4     1 | 4
     \endcode
*/
unsigned NumDigits64bs(uint64_t x) {
    return // Num-># Digits->[0-9] 64->bits bs->Binary Search
    ( x >= 10000000000ul // [11-20] [1-10]
    ?
        ( x >= 1000000000000000ul // [16-20] [11-15]
        ?   // [16-20]
            ( x >= 100000000000000000ul // [18-20] [16-17]
            ?   // [18-20]
                ( x >= 1000000000000000000ul // [19-20] [18]
                ? // [19-20]
                    ( x >=  10000000000000000000ul // [20] [19]
                    ?   20
                    :   19
                    )
                : 18
                )
            :   // [16-17]
                ( x >=  10000000000000000ul // [17] [16]
                ?   17
                :   16
                )
            )
        :   // [11-15]
            ( x >= 1000000000000ul // [13-15] [11-12]
            ?   // [13-15]
                ( x >= 10000000000000ul // [14-15] [13]
                ? // [14-15]
                    ( x >=  100000000000000ul // [15] [14]
                    ?   15
                    :   14
                    )
                : 13
                )
            :   // [11-12]
                ( x >=  100000000000ul // [12] [11]
                ?   12
                :   11
                )
            )
        )
    :   // [1-10]
        ( x >= 100000ul // [6-10] [1-5]
        ?   // [6-10]
            ( x >= 10000000ul // [8-10] [6-7]
            ?   // [8-10]
                ( x >= 100000000ul // [9-10] [8]
                ? // [9-10]
                    ( x >=  1000000000ul // [10] [9]
                    ?   10
                    :    9
                    )
                : 8
                )
            :   // [6-7]
                ( x >=  1000000ul // [7] [6]
                ?   7
                :   6
                )
            )
        :   // [1-5]
            ( x >= 100ul // [3-5] [1-2]
            ?   // [3-5]
                ( x >= 1000ul // [4-5] [3]
                ? // [4-5]
                    ( x >=  10000ul // [5] [4]
                    ?   5
                    :   4
                    )
                : 3
                )
            :   // [1-2]
                ( x >=  10ul // [2] [1]
                ?   2
                :   1
                )
            )
        )
    );
}
1

sample console output

long long num = 123456789;
int digit = 1;
int result = 1;

while (result != 0) 
{
    result = num / 10;
    if (result != 0)
    {
        ++digit;
    }
    num = result;
}

cout << "Your number has " << digit << "digits" << endl;
1
  • You should make the solution a function, preferrably. Also you can include the sample output as text.
    – U. Windl
    Commented Dec 31, 2020 at 20:13
1

Use the best and efficient way of log10(n) approach which gives you the desired result in just logarithmic time.

For negative number abs() converts it into positive number and for the number 0, the if condition stops you from proceeding further and prints the output as 0.

#include <iostream>
#include <bits/stdc++.h>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int n; std::cin >> n;
    if(n)
        std::cout << floor(log10(abs(n))+1) << std::endl;
    else
        std::cout << 0 << std::endl;
    return 0;
}
1

Here is neat trick that uses fact that intLog2 is easy and fast and that: log10(x) = log2(x)/log2(10). Rounding issue have to be taken into account.

demo

constexpr int intPow(int base, int n) {
    int result = 1;
    while (n) {
        if (n & 1 == 1)
            result *= base;
        base *= base;
        n >>= 1;
    }
    return result;
}

constexpr int intLog2(int x) {
    int result = -1;
    while (x) {
        x >>= 1;
        ++result;
    }
    return result;
}

constexpr int intLog10(int x) {
    constexpr int powersOf10[]{1,         10,        100,     1000,
                               10000,     100000,    1000000, 10000000,
                               100000000, 1000000000};
    auto aprox = (intLog2(x) + 1) * 1233 >> 12;
    return aprox - (x < powersOf10[aprox]);
}

All is done on integers. No divisions, so should be quite fast, but lookup table is probably faster (maybe will provide benchmark for that).

3
  • Can you extend this for float? My problem is I can't cast float in int.
    – Tom Tom
    Commented Apr 7, 2023 at 12:32
  • 1
    For floats it is a complex problem and depends on definition how number should be represented
    – Marek R
    Commented Apr 7, 2023 at 14:33
  • intLog2 can be rewritten as return std::numeric_limits<int>::digits - std::countl_zero(static_cast<unsigned>(x)); Commented Jan 14 at 0:43
0

Yet another code snippet, doing basically the same as Vitali's but employs binary search. Powers array is lazy initialized once per unsigned type instance. Signed type overload takes care of minus sign.

#include <limits>
#include <type_traits>
#include <array>

template <class T> 
size_t NumberOfDecPositions ( T v, typename std::enable_if<std::is_unsigned<T>::value>::type* = 0 )
{
    typedef std::array<T,std::numeric_limits<T>::digits10+1> array_type;
    static array_type powers_of_10;
    if ( powers_of_10.front() == 0 )
    {
        T n = 1;
        for ( T& i: powers_of_10 )
        {
            i = n;
            n *= 10;
        }
    }

    size_t l = 0, r = powers_of_10.size(), p;
    while ( l+1 < r )
    {
        p = (l+r)/2;
        if ( powers_of_10[p] <= v )
            l = p;
        else
            r = p;
    }
    return l + 1;
};

template <class T> 
size_t NumberOfDecPositions ( T v, typename std::enable_if<std::is_signed<T>::value>::type* = 0 )
{
    typedef typename std::make_unsigned<T>::type unsigned_type;
    if ( v < 0 )
        return NumberOfDecPositions ( static_cast<unsigned_type>(-v) ) + 1;
    else
        return NumberOfDecPositions ( static_cast<unsigned_type>(v) );
}

If anybody cares of further optimization, please note that the first element of powers array is never used, and the l appears with +1 2 times.

0

in case the number of digits AND the value of each digit position is needed use this:

int64_t = number, digitValue, digits = 0;    // or "int" for 32bit

while (number != 0) {
    digitValue = number % 10;
    digits ++;
    number /= 10;
}

digit gives you the value at the number postition which is currently processed in the loop. for example for the number 1776 the digit value is:
6 in the 1st loop
7 in the 2nd loop
7 in the 3rd loop
1 in the 4th loop

0

C++11 update of preferred solution:

#include <limits>
#include <type_traits>
        template <typename T>
        typename std::enable_if<std::numeric_limits<T>::is_integer, unsigned int>::type
        numberDigits(T value) {
            unsigned int digits = 0;
            if (value < 0) digits = 1;
            while (value) {
                value /= 10;
                ++digits;
            }
            return digits;
        }

prevents template instantiation with double, et. al.

0
// Meta-program to calculate number of digits in (unsigned) 'N'.    
template <unsigned long long N, unsigned base=10>
struct numberlength
{   // http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1489830/
    enum { value = ( 1<=N && N<base ? 1 : 1+numberlength<N/base, base>::value ) };
};

template <unsigned base>
struct numberlength<0, base>
{
    enum { value = 1 };
};

{
    assert( (1 == numberlength<0,10>::value) );
}
assert( (1 == numberlength<1,10>::value) );
assert( (1 == numberlength<5,10>::value) );
assert( (1 == numberlength<9,10>::value) );

assert( (4 == numberlength<1000,10>::value) );
assert( (4 == numberlength<5000,10>::value) );
assert( (4 == numberlength<9999,10>::value) );
1
  • Correction for "Practical joke" from 'blinnov.com' above
    – Adolfo
    Commented Dec 22, 2014 at 11:50
0

for integer 'X' you want to know the number of digits , alright without using any loop , this solution act in one formula in one line only so this is the most optimal solution i have ever seen to this problem .

 int x = 1000 ; 
 cout<<numberOfDigits = 1+floor(log10(x))<<endl ; 
3
  • Fails for INT_MAX and also for negative numbers.
    – ranu
    Commented Apr 21, 2017 at 5:28
  • @ranu Fails for INT_MAX how? When the argument is converted to double? Or are you referring to some impossible integer input with INT_MAX decimal digits? Which would also fail every other answer here?
    – user207421
    Commented Mar 30, 2020 at 0:20
  • This is "efficient" w.r.t. space efficiency of the source code of the executable. Usually, "efficiency [of a program]" refers to time or space efficiency of the algorithm, since these actually reduce runtime and main memory requirements. I would suggest to never code in C++ like that. The algorithm is terribly inefficient (with little automated optimization potential) and even involves floating-point arithmetic to solve a very simple task. If you nontheless prefer that style, there are declarative programming languages like Haskell for it.
    – xamid
    Commented Mar 15, 2022 at 11:10
0
int num,dig_quant = 0;
cout<<"\n\n\t\t--Count the digits in Number--\n\n";
cout<<"Enter Number: ";
cin>>num;
for(int i = 1; i<=num; i*=10){
    if(num / i  > 0){
      dig_quant += 1;
    }
}
 cout<<"\n"<<number<<" include "<<dig_quant<<" digit"
 cout<<"\n\nGoodbye...\n\n";
0

I was working on a program that required me to check if the user correctly answered how many digits were in a number, so i had to develop a way to check the amount of digits in an integer. It ended up being a relatively easy thing to solve.

double check=0, exponent=1000;

while(check<=1)
{
    check=number/pow(10, exponent);
    exponent--;
}

exponent=exponent+2;
cout<<exponent<<endl;

This ended up being my answer which currently works with numbers with less than 10^1000 digits (can be changed by changing the value of exponent).

P.S. I know this answer is ten years late but I got here on 2020 so other people might use it.

0

You can use this recursive function, which calls itself while its argument is greater or equal to 10.

int numDigits(int n) {
    return n >= 10 ? numDigits(n / 10) + 1 : 1;
}

Example usage:

#include <iostream>

int numDigits(int n) {
    return n >= 10 ? numDigits(n / 10) + 1 : 1;
}

int main() {
    int values[] = {0, 4, 10, 43, 789, 1500};
    for (int n : values) {
        std::cout << n << ": " << numDigits(n) << '\n';
    }
    return 0;
}

Output:

0: 1
4: 1
10: 2
43: 2
789: 3
1500: 4
1
  • Good, but it is not fast enough, and fails (like many others) with float FLOAT_MAX.
    – Tom Tom
    Commented Apr 7, 2023 at 12:29
-1
template <typename type>
class number_of_decimal_digits {   
    const powers_and_max<type> mPowersAndMax;
public:
    number_of_decimal_digits(){
    }   
    inline size_t ndigits( type i) const {
        if(i<0){
             i += (i == std::numeric_limits<type>::min());
             i=-i;
        }
        const type* begin = &*mPowersAndMax.begin();
        const type* end = begin+mPowersAndMax.size();
        return 1 + std::lower_bound(begin,end,i) - begin;
    }
    inline size_t string_ndigits(const type& i) const {
        return (i<0) + ndigits(i);
    }
    inline size_t operator[](const type& i) const {
       return string_ndigits(i);
    }
};

where in powers_and_max we have (10^n)-1 for all n such that

(10^n) < std::numeric_limits<type>::max()

and std::numeric_limits<type>::max() in an array:

template <typename type>
struct powers_and_max : protected std::vector<type>{
    typedef std::vector<type> super;
    using super::const_iterator;
    using super::size;
    type& operator[](size_t i)const{return super::operator[](i)};
    const_iterator begin()const {return super::begin();} 
    const_iterator end()const {return super::end();} 
    powers_and_max() {
       const int size = (int)(log10(double(std::numeric_limits<type>::max())));
       int j = 0;
       type i = 10;
       for( ; j<size ;++j){
           push_back(i-1);//9,99,999,9999 etc;
           i*=10;
       }
       ASSERT(back()<std::numeric_limits<type>::max());
       push_back(std::numeric_limits<type>::max());
   }
};

here's a simple test:

number_of_decimal_digits<int>  ndd;
ASSERT(ndd[0]==1);
ASSERT(ndd[9]==1);
ASSERT(ndd[10]==2);
ASSERT(ndd[-10]==3);
ASSERT(ndd[-1]==2);
ASSERT(ndd[-9]==2);
ASSERT(ndd[1000000000]==10);
ASSERT(ndd[0x7fffffff]==10);
ASSERT(ndd[-1000000000]==11);
ASSERT(ndd[0x80000000]==11);

Of course any other implementation of an ordered set might be used for powers_and_max and if there was knowledge that there would be clustering but no knowledge of where the cluster might be perhaps a self adjusting tree implementation might be best

-1

effective way

int num;
int count = 0;
while(num)
{
   num /= 10;
   ++count;
}

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
   int num;
   std::cin >> num;

   std::cout << "number of digits for " << num << ": ";

   int count = 0;
   while(num)
   {
      num /= 10;
      ++count;
   }

   std::cout << count << '\n';

   return 0;
}
-1
int numberOfDigits(double number){
    if(number < 0){
        number*=-1;
    }
    int i=0;
        while(number > pow(10, i))
            i++;    
    cout << "This number has " << i << " digits" << endl;
    return i;
}

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.