Here's the scenario: Activity contains fragment A, which in turn uses getChildFragmentManager() to add fragments A1 and A2 in its onCreate like so:

getChildFragmentManager()
  .beginTransaction()
  .replace(R.id.fragmentOneHolder, new FragmentA1())
  .replace(R.id.fragmentTwoHolder, new FragmentA2())
  .commit()

So far, so good, everything is running as expected.

We then run the following transaction in the Activity:

getSupportFragmentManager()
  .beginTransaction()
  .setCustomAnimations(anim1, anim2, anim1, anim2)
  .replace(R.id.fragmentHolder, new FragmentB())
  .addToBackStack(null)
  .commit()

During the transition, the enter animations for fragment B runs correctly but fragments A1 and A2 disappear entirely. When we revert the transaction with the Back button, they initialize properly and display normally during the popEnter animation.

In my brief testing, it got weirder - if I set the animations for the child fragments (see below), the exit animation runs intermittently when we add fragment B

getChildFragmentManager()
  .beginTransaction()
  .setCustomAnimations(enter, exit)
  .replace(R.id.fragmentOneHolder, new FragmentA1())
  .replace(R.id.fragmentTwoHolder, new FragmentA2())
  .commit()

The effect I want to achieve is simple - I want the exit (or should it be popExit?) animation on fragment A (anim2) to run, animating the whole container, including its nested children.

Is there any way to achieve that?

Edit: Please find a test case here

Edit2: Thanks to @StevenByle for pushing me to keep trying with the static animations. Apparently you can set animations on a per-op basis (not global to the whole transaction), which means the children can have an indefinite static animation set, while their parent can have a different animation and the whole thing can be committed in one transaction. See the discussion below and the updated test case project.

  • What is R.id.fragmentHolder with respect to A, A1, A2, etc? – CommonsWare Feb 15 '13 at 18:09
  • fragmentHolder is an id in the activity's layout, fragment{One,Two}Holder are in fragment A's layout. All three are distinct. Fragment A was initially added in fragmentHolder (i. e., fragment B is replacing fragment A). – Delyan Feb 15 '13 at 19:57
  • I have created a sample project here: github.com/BurntBrunch/NestedFragmentsAnimationsTest , there's also an apk included in the repository. This is a really annoying bug and I'm looking for a way to work around it (assuming that it's not in my code). – Delyan Feb 18 '13 at 11:40
  • I know a bit more about this issue now. The reason the fragments disappear is because the children handle the lifecycle events before the parent. In essence, A1 and A2 are removed before A and since they don't have animations set, they disappear abruptly. A way to somewhat mitigate this is to explicitly remove A1 and A2 in the transaction that replaces A. That way, they animate when they exit, however their animation speed is squared, since the parent container is also animating. A solution which doesn't produce this artefact would be appreciated. – Delyan Feb 18 '13 at 15:30
  • The change(replacing the starter fragment) you mention in the question is the real one you want to do or it's just an example? You'll call the changeFragment method only one time? – Luksprog Feb 20 '13 at 11:00

13 Answers 13

up vote 33 down vote accepted
+100

In order to avoid the user seeing the nested fragments disappearing when the parent fragment is removed/replaced in a transaction you could "simulate" those fragments still being present by providing an image of them, as they appeared on the screen. This image will be used as a background for the nested fragments container so even if the views of the nested fragment go away the image will simulate their presence. Also, I don't see loosing the interactivity with the nested fragment's views as a problem because I don't think you would want the user to act on them when they are just in the process of being removed(probably as a user action as well).

I've made a little example with setting up the background image(something basic).

  • 1
    I've decided to award you the bounty, since that was the solution I ended up using. Thank you so much for your time! – Delyan Feb 24 '13 at 19:03
  • 13
    Wow, so filthy. The lengths us Android developers have to go to just for some slickness – Dean Wild Mar 31 '15 at 11:34
  • 1
    i Have a Viewpager From Second tab i'm replacing other fragment and when i'm pressing back on it i need to show viewpager second tab,it is opening but it is showing blank page. I tried what you suggested in the above thread but still it is same. – Harish Oct 7 '15 at 14:28
  • Problem remains when user comes back as @Harish wrote – Ewoks May 19 '16 at 6:36
  • @Ewoks My answer is very old and was hacky even at the time when writing it. Check the other answers, like kcoppock's one, to see if they solve the problem. – Luksprog May 19 '16 at 6:48

So there seem to be a lot of different workarounds for this, but based on @Jayd16's answer, I think I've found a pretty solid catch-all solution that still allows for custom transition animations on child fragments, and doesn't require doing a bitmap cache of the layout.

Have a BaseFragment class that extends Fragment, and make all of your fragments extend that class (not just child fragments).

In that BaseFragment class, add the following:

// Arbitrary value; set it to some reasonable default
private static final int DEFAULT_CHILD_ANIMATION_DURATION = 250;

@Override
public Animation onCreateAnimation(int transit, boolean enter, int nextAnim) {
    final Fragment parent = getParentFragment();

    // Apply the workaround only if this is a child fragment, and the parent
    // is being removed.
    if (!enter && parent != null && parent.isRemoving()) {
        // This is a workaround for the bug where child fragments disappear when
        // the parent is removed (as all children are first removed from the parent)
        // See https://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=55228
        Animation doNothingAnim = new AlphaAnimation(1, 1);
        doNothingAnim.setDuration(getNextAnimationDuration(parent, DEFAULT_CHILD_ANIMATION_DURATION));
        return doNothingAnim;
    } else {
        return super.onCreateAnimation(transit, enter, nextAnim);
    }
}

private static long getNextAnimationDuration(Fragment fragment, long defValue) {
    try {
        // Attempt to get the resource ID of the next animation that
        // will be applied to the given fragment.
        Field nextAnimField = Fragment.class.getDeclaredField("mNextAnim");
        nextAnimField.setAccessible(true);
        int nextAnimResource = nextAnimField.getInt(fragment);
        Animation nextAnim = AnimationUtils.loadAnimation(fragment.getActivity(), nextAnimResource);

        // ...and if it can be loaded, return that animation's duration
        return (nextAnim == null) ? defValue : nextAnim.getDuration();
    } catch (NoSuchFieldException|IllegalAccessException|Resources.NotFoundException ex) {
        Log.w(TAG, "Unable to load next animation from parent.", ex);
        return defValue;
    }
}

It does, unfortunately, require reflection; however, since this workaround is for the support library, you don't run the risk of the underlying implementation changing unless you update your support library. If you're building the support library from source, you could add an accessor for the next animation resource ID to Fragment.java and remove the need for reflection.

This solution removes the need to "guess" the parent's animation duration (so that the "do nothing" animation will have the same duration as the parent's exit animation), and allows you to still do custom animations on child fragments (e.g. if you're swapping child fragments around with different animations).

  • 5
    This is my favorite solution in the thread. Does not require a bitmap, does not require any extra code in the child fragment, and does not really leak information from the parent to the child fragment. – jacobhyphenated Jun 13 '14 at 14:52
  • 1
    Brilliant!!! Thank you very much. Simple, quick, easy and not at least effective – Jakob Dec 17 '14 at 21:16
  • 1
    @EugenPechanec You need the nextAnim from the parent fragment -- not the one from the child. That's the whole point. – kcoppock Oct 2 '15 at 21:29
  • 6
    Thank you for this very useful solution, however it requires a little update to work with the current support library (27.0.2, don't know which version broke this code). mNextAnimis now inside an mAnimationInfoobject. You can access it like this :Field animInfoField = Fragment.class.getDeclaredField("mAnimationInfo"); animInfoField.setAccessible(true); Object animationInfo = animInfoField.get(fragment); Field nextAnimField = animationInfo.getClass().getDeclaredField("mNextAnim"); – David Lericolais Dec 5 '17 at 8:26
  • 3
    @DavidLericolais, would like to further add another line of code after yours. val nextAnimResource = nextAnimField.getInt(animationInfo); to replace the line int nextAnimResource = nextAnimField.getInt(fragment); – tingyik90 Apr 24 at 11:11

I was able to come up with a pretty clean solution. IMO its the least hacky, and while this is technically the "draw a bitmap" solution at least its abstracted by the fragment lib.

Make sure your child frags override a parent class with this:

private static final Animation dummyAnimation = new AlphaAnimation(1,1);
static{
    dummyAnimation.setDuration(500);
}

@Override
public Animation onCreateAnimation(int transit, boolean enter, int nextAnim) {
    if(!enter && getParentFragment() != null){
        return dummyAnimation;
    }
    return super.onCreateAnimation(transit, enter, nextAnim);
}

If we have an exit animation on the child frags, they will be animated instead of blink away. We can exploit this by having an animation that simply draws the child fragments at full alpha for a duration. This way, they'll stay visible in the parent fragment as it animates, giving the desired behavior.

The only issue I can think of is keeping track of that duration. I could maybe set it to a large-ish number but I'm afraid that might have performance issues if its still drawing that animation somewhere.

  • This works really nicely. – Graham Borland Apr 17 '14 at 12:54
  • It's works for me too. GG :) – Vincent Ducastel Oct 27 '16 at 17:04
  • It helps, thanks. Value of duration time doesn't matter – iscariot May 17 '17 at 15:12
  • cleanest solution so far – Liran Cohen Sep 7 '17 at 14:39
  • Nice, thanks a lot! – Fori Sep 19 at 14:01

Im posting my solution for clarity. The solution is quite simple. If you are trying to mimic the parent's fragment transaction animation just simply add a custom animation to the child fragment transaction with same duration. Oh and make sure you set the custom animation before add().

getChildFragmentManager().beginTransaction()
        .setCustomAnimations(R.anim.none, R.anim.none, R.anim.none, R.anim.none)
        .add(R.id.container, nestedFragment)
        .commit();

The xml for R.anim.none (My parents enter/exit animation time is 250ms)

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<set xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android">
    <translate android:fromXDelta="0" android:toXDelta="0" android:duration="250" />
</set>
  • I've done something very similar but used "show" rather than "add" when updating the child. I also added "getChildFragmentManager().executePendingTransactions()", though I'm not sure if that is strictly necessary. This solution works just fine, though, and doesn't require "providing an image" of the Fragment like some suggest. – Brian Yencho Oct 26 '17 at 15:04
  • This was great. However, I was getting the delay when switching my child fragments. to avoid this, just set the 2nd parameter with no anim: fragmentTransaction.setCustomAnimations(R.anim.none, 0, R.anim.none, R.anim.none) – ono May 21 at 2:13

I understand this may not be able to completely solve your problem, but maybe it will suit someone else's needs, you can add enter/exit and popEnter/popExit animations to your children Fragments that do not actually move/animate the Fragments. As long as the animations have the same duration/offset as their parent Fragment animations, they will appear to move/animate with the parent's animation.

  • 1
    I've awarded the bounty to Luksprog since his solution works universally. I did try the static animations trick (the duration actually doesn't matter - once the parent is gone, the views obviously disappear) but they didn't work in all possible cases (see my comments under the question). Also, this approach leaks abstraction, since the parent of a fragment with children needs to know about that fact and take extra steps to set the children's animations. In any case, thank you very much for your time! – Delyan Feb 24 '13 at 19:06
  • Agreed, this is more of a workaround than a watertight solution, and can be considered slightly fragile. But it will work for simple cases. – Steven Byle Feb 24 '13 at 20:01

@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

EDIT: I ended up unimplementing this solution as there were other problems that this has. Square recently came out with 2 libraries that replace fragments. I'd say this might actually be a better alternative than trying to hack fragments into doing something google doesn't want them doing.

http://corner.squareup.com/2014/01/mortar-and-flow.html

@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

I figured I'd put up this solution to help people who have this problem in the future. If you trace through the original posters conversation with other people, and look at the code he posted, you'll see the original poster eventually comes to the conclusion of using a no-op animation on the child fragments while animating the parent fragment. This solution isn't ideal as it forces you to keep track of all the child fragments, which can be cumbersome when using a ViewPager with FragmentPagerAdapter.

Since I use Child Fragments all over the place I came up with this solution that is efficient, and modular (so it can be easily removed) in case they ever fix it and this no-op animation is no longer needed.

There are lots of ways you can implement this. I chose to use a singleton, and I call it ChildFragmentAnimationManager. It basically will keep track of a child fragment for me based on its parent and will apply a no-op animation to the children when asked.

public class ChildFragmentAnimationManager {

private static ChildFragmentAnimationManager instance = null;

private Map<Fragment, List<Fragment>> fragmentMap;

private ChildFragmentAnimationManager() {
    fragmentMap = new HashMap<Fragment, List<Fragment>>();
}

public static ChildFragmentAnimationManager instance() {
    if (instance == null) {
        instance = new ChildFragmentAnimationManager();
    }
    return instance;
}

public FragmentTransaction animate(FragmentTransaction ft, Fragment parent) {
    List<Fragment> children = getChildren(parent);

    ft.setCustomAnimations(R.anim.no_anim, R.anim.no_anim, R.anim.no_anim, R.anim.no_anim);
    for (Fragment child : children) {
        ft.remove(child);
    }

    return ft;
}

public void putChild(Fragment parent, Fragment child) {
    List<Fragment> children = getChildren(parent);
    children.add(child);
}

public void removeChild(Fragment parent, Fragment child) {
    List<Fragment> children = getChildren(parent);
    children.remove(child);
}

private List<Fragment> getChildren(Fragment parent) {
    List<Fragment> children;

    if ( fragmentMap.containsKey(parent) ) {
        children = fragmentMap.get(parent);
    } else {
        children = new ArrayList<Fragment>(3);
        fragmentMap.put(parent, children);
    }

    return children;
}

}

Next you need to have a class that extends Fragment that all your Fragments extend (at least your Child Fragments). I already had this class, and I call it BaseFragment. When a fragments view is created, we add it to the ChildFragmentAnimationManager, and remove it when it's destroyed. You could do this onAttach/Detach, or other matching methods in the sequence. My logic for choosing Create/Destroy View was because if a Fragment doesn't have a View, I don't care about animating it to continue to be seen. This approach should also work better with ViewPagers that use Fragments as you won't be keeping track of every single Fragment that a FragmentPagerAdapter is holding, but rather only 3.

public abstract class BaseFragment extends Fragment {

@Override
public  View onCreateView(LayoutInflater inflater, ViewGroup container,
        Bundle savedInstanceState) {

    Fragment parent = getParentFragment();
    if (parent != null) {
        ChildFragmentAnimationManager.instance().putChild(parent, this);
    }

    return super.onCreateView(inflater, container, savedInstanceState);
}

@Override
public void onDestroyView() {
    Fragment parent = getParentFragment();
    if (parent != null) {
        ChildFragmentAnimationManager.instance().removeChild(parent, this);
    }

    super.onDestroyView();
}

}

Now that all your Fragments are stored in memory by the parent fragment, you can call animate on them like this, and your child fragments won't disappear.

FragmentTransaction ft = getActivity().getSupportFragmentManager().beginTransaction();
ChildFragmentAnimationManager.instance().animate(ft, ReaderFragment.this)
                    .setCustomAnimations(R.anim.up_in, R.anim.up_out, R.anim.down_in, R.anim.down_out)
                    .replace(R.id.container, f)
                    .addToBackStack(null)
                    .commit();

Also, just so you have it, here is the no_anim.xml file that goes in your res/anim folder:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<set xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android" android:interpolator="@android:anim/linear_interpolator">
    <translate android:fromXDelta="0" android:toXDelta="0"
        android:duration="1000" />
</set>

Again, I don't think this solution is perfect, but it's much better than for every instance you have a Child Fragment, implementing custom code in the parent fragment to keep track of each child. I've been there, and it's no fun.

I was having the same issue with map fragment. It kept disappearing during the exit animation of its containing fragment. The workaround is to add animation for the child map fragment which will keep it visible during the exit animation of the parent fragment. The animation of the child fragment is keeping its alpha at 100% during its duration period.

Animation: res/animator/keep_child_fragment.xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>    
<set xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android">
    <objectAnimator
        android:propertyName="alpha"
        android:valueFrom="1.0"
        android:valueTo="1.0"
        android:duration="@integer/keep_child_fragment_animation_duration" />
</set>

The animation is then applied when the map fragment is added to the parent fragment.

Parent fragment

@Override
public View onCreateView(LayoutInflater inflater, ViewGroup container,
                         Bundle savedInstanceState) {

    View view = inflater.inflate(R.layout.map_parent_fragment, container, false);

    MapFragment mapFragment =  MapFragment.newInstance();

    getChildFragmentManager().beginTransaction()
            .setCustomAnimations(R.animator.keep_child_fragment, 0, 0, 0)
            .add(R.id.map, mapFragment)
            .commit();

    return view;
}

Finally, the duration of the child fragment animation is set in a resource file.

values/integers.xml

<resources>
  <integer name="keep_child_fragment_animation_duration">500</integer>
</resources>

you can do this in the child fragment.

@Override
public Animator onCreateAnimator(int transit, boolean enter, int nextAnim) {
    if (true) {//condition
        ObjectAnimator objectAnimator = ObjectAnimator.ofFloat(getView(), "alpha", 1, 1);
        objectAnimator.setDuration(333);//time same with parent fragment's animation
        return objectAnimator;
    }
    return super.onCreateAnimator(transit, enter, nextAnim);
}

I think i found a better solution to this problem than snapshotting the current fragment to a bitmap as Luksprog suggested.

The trick is to hide the fragment being removed or detached and only after the animations have been completed the fragment is removed or detached in its own fragment transaction.

Imagine we have FragmentA and FragmentB, both with sub fragments. Now when you would normally do:

getSupportFragmentManager()
  .beginTransaction()
  .setCustomAnimations(anim1, anim2, anim1, anim2)
  .add(R.id.fragmentHolder, new FragmentB())
  .remove(fragmentA)    <-------------------------------------------
  .addToBackStack(null)
  .commit()

Instead you do

getSupportFragmentManager()
  .beginTransaction()
  .setCustomAnimations(anim1, anim2, anim1, anim2)
  .add(R.id.fragmentHolder, new FragmentB())
  .hide(fragmentA)    <---------------------------------------------
  .addToBackStack(null)
  .commit()

fragmentA.removeMe = true;

Now for the implementation of the Fragment:

public class BaseFragment extends Fragment {

    protected Boolean detachMe = false;
    protected Boolean removeMe = false;

    @Override
    public Animation onCreateAnimation(int transit, boolean enter, int nextAnim) {
        if (nextAnim == 0) {
            if (!enter) {
                onExit();
            }

            return null;
        }

        Animation animation = AnimationUtils.loadAnimation(getActivity(), nextAnim);
        assert animation != null;

        if (!enter) {
            animation.setAnimationListener(new Animation.AnimationListener() {
                @Override
                public void onAnimationStart(Animation animation) {
                }

                @Override
                public void onAnimationEnd(Animation animation) {
                    onExit();
                }

                @Override
                public void onAnimationRepeat(Animation animation) {
                }
            });
        }

        return animation;
    }

    private void onExit() {
        if (!detachMe && !removeMe) {
            return;
        }

        FragmentTransaction fragmentTransaction = getFragmentManager().beginTransaction();
        if (detachMe) {
            fragmentTransaction.detach(this);
            detachMe = false;
        } else if (removeMe) {
            fragmentTransaction.remove(this);
            removeMe = false;
        }
        fragmentTransaction.commit();
    }
}
  • Wouldn't the popBackStack causes an Error because it's trying to show a Fragment that has been detached? – Alexandre Mar 5 '14 at 19:14

To animate dissapearance of neasted fragments we can force pop back stack on ChildFragmentManager. This will fire transition animation. To do this we need to catch up OnBackButtonPressed event or listen for backstack changes.

Here is example with code.

View.OnClickListener() {//this is from custom button but you can listen for back button pressed
            @Override
            public void onClick(View v) {
                getChildFragmentManager().popBackStack();
                //and here we can manage other fragment operations 
            }
        });

  Fragment fr = MyNeastedFragment.newInstance(product);

  getChildFragmentManager()
          .beginTransaction()
                .setTransition(FragmentTransaction.TRANSIT_FRAGMENT_CLOSE)
                .replace(R.neasted_fragment_container, fr)
                .addToBackStack("Neasted Fragment")
                .commit();

I recently ran into this problem in my question: Nested fragments transitioning incorrectly

I have a solution that solves this without saving a bitmap, nor using reflection or any other unsatisfying methods.

An example project can be viewed here: https://github.com/zafrani/NestedFragmentTransitions

A GIF of the effect can be viewed here: https://imgur.com/94AvrW4

In my example there are 6 children fragments, split between two parent fragments. I'm able to achieve the transitions for enter, exit, pop and push without any problems. Configuration changes and back presses are also successfully handled.

The bulk of the solution is in my BaseFragment's (the fragment extended by my children and parent fragments) onCreateAnimator function which looks like this:

   override fun onCreateAnimator(transit: Int, enter: Boolean, nextAnim: Int): Animator {
    if (isConfigChange) {
        resetStates()
        return nothingAnim()
    }

    if (parentFragment is ParentFragment) {
        if ((parentFragment as BaseFragment).isPopping) {
            return nothingAnim()
        }
    }

    if (parentFragment != null && parentFragment.isRemoving) {
        return nothingAnim()
    }

    if (enter) {
        if (isPopping) {
            resetStates()
            return pushAnim()
        }
        if (isSuppressing) {
            resetStates()
            return nothingAnim()
        }
        return enterAnim()
    }

    if (isPopping) {
        resetStates()
        return popAnim()
    }

    if (isSuppressing) {
        resetStates()
        return nothingAnim()
    }

    return exitAnim()
}

The activity and parent fragment are responsible for setting the states of these booleans. Its easier to view how and where from my example project.

I am not using support fragments in my example, but the same logic can be used with them and their onCreateAnimation function

A simple way to fix this problem is use the Fragment class from this library instead of the standard library fragment class:

https://github.com/marksalpeter/contract-fragment

As a side note, the package also contains a useful delegate pattern called ContractFragment that you might find useful for building your apps leveraging the parent-child fragment relationship.

From the above answer of @kcoppock,

if you have Activity->Fragment->Fragments ( multiple stacking, the following helps ), a minor edit to the best answer IMHO.

public Animation onCreateAnimation(int transit, boolean enter, int nextAnim) {

    final Fragment parent = getParentFragment();

    Fragment parentOfParent = null;

    if( parent!=null ) {
        parentOfParent = parent.getParentFragment();
    }

    if( !enter && parent != null && parentOfParent!=null && parentOfParent.isRemoving()){
        Animation doNothingAnim = new AlphaAnimation(1, 1);
        doNothingAnim.setDuration(getNextAnimationDuration(parent, DEFAULT_CHILD_ANIMATION_DURATION));
        return doNothingAnim;
    } else
    if (!enter && parent != null && parent.isRemoving()) {
        // This is a workaround for the bug where child fragments disappear when
        // the parent is removed (as all children are first removed from the parent)
        // See https://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=55228
        Animation doNothingAnim = new AlphaAnimation(1, 1);
        doNothingAnim.setDuration(getNextAnimationDuration(parent, DEFAULT_CHILD_ANIMATION_DURATION));
        return doNothingAnim;
    } else {
        return super.onCreateAnimation(transit, enter, nextAnim);
    }
}

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