3

Is there a single line expression to accomplish the following:

input = ['this', 'is', 'a', 'list']
output = [('this', 'is'), ('a', 'list')]

My initial idea was to create two lists and then zip them up. That would take three lines.

The list will have an even number of elements.

marked as duplicate by bernie, Josh Caswell, Colonel Panic, Lev Levitsky, Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Feb 15 '13 at 20:23

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  • And what if your list have odd number of elements? – Rohit Jain Feb 15 '13 at 20:20
  • You can ignore that for now. – David542 Feb 15 '13 at 20:20
  • Your original plan is fine. I'm sure you could hammer it into one ugly line. – Colonel Panic Feb 15 '13 at 20:21
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This is quite short:

zip(input, input[1:])[::2]
  • The question has been marked as a duplicate, but I have't seen this answer yet :) I must say I like it... – piokuc Feb 15 '13 at 20:27
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    Note: does not work in python3. See root's answer for a python3 solution. – 00500005 Mar 12 '14 at 17:14
  • Interesting, thanks. – piokuc Mar 12 '14 at 18:24
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    Try zip(input[::2], input[1::2]) for python3 (inspired by your answer) – NorthIsUp May 9 '17 at 22:35
  • @NorthIsUp nice, thanks! – piokuc May 22 '17 at 9:04
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In [4]: zip(*[iter(lst)]*2)
Out[4]: [('this', 'is'), ('a', 'list')]
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    this... is inspired. – Andy Hayden Jul 30 '13 at 11:26
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    Does this work because you are feeding zip the same iterator twice, so after getting the first item from the "first list" the first item from the "second list" is actually the 2nd item in the original list? – flutefreak7 May 7 '15 at 20:00
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>>> input = ['this', 'is', 'a', 'list']

>>> [(input[i], input[i + 1]) for i in range(0, len(input), 2)]
[('this', 'is'), ('a', 'list')]

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