2

I'm trying to implement is_polymorphic_functor meta-function to get the following results:

//non-polymorphic functor
template<typename T> struct X { void operator()(T); };

//polymorphic functor 
struct Y { template<typename T> void operator()(T); };

std::cout << is_polymorphic_functor<X<int>>::value << std::endl; //false
std::cout << is_polymorphic_functor<Y>::value << std::endl; //true

Well that is just an example. Ideally, it should work for any number of parameters, i.e operator()(T...). Here are few more test cases which I used to test @Andrei Tita's solution which fails for two test-cases.

And I tried this:

template<typename F>
struct is_polymorphic_functor
{
  private:
     typedef struct { char x[1]; }  yes;
     typedef struct { char x[10]; } no;

     static yes check(...);

     template<typename T >
     static no check(T*, char (*) [sizeof(functor_traits<T>)] = 0 );            
  public:
     static const bool value = sizeof(check(static_cast<F*>(0))) == sizeof(yes);
};

which attempts to make use of the following implementation of functor_traits:

//functor traits
template <typename T>
struct functor_traits : functor_traits<decltype(&T::operator())>{};

template <typename C, typename R, typename... A>
struct functor_traits<R(C::*)(A...) const> : functor_traits<R(C::*)(A...)>{};

template <typename C, typename R, typename... A>
struct functor_traits<R(C::*)(A...)>
{
   static const size_t arity = sizeof...(A) };

   typedef R result_type;

   template <size_t i>
   struct arg
   {
      typedef typename std::tuple_element<i, std::tuple<A...>>::type type;
   };
};

which gives the following error for polymorphic functors:

error: decltype cannot resolve address of overloaded function

How to fix this issue and make is_polymorphic_functor work as expected?

2
  • Pretty sure it's actually impossible to test for an arbitrary number of functions with a semi-fixed signature like polymorphic2, but I don't see the use-case for it. What useful information will it provide, if you don't already know the signature? – Andrei Tita Feb 16 '13 at 17:33
  • So, struct test { void operator()(int) {}; void operator()(double) {}; }; is polymorphic, but is struct crazy { template<typename T> typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<int, T>::value>::type operator()( T ) {}; }; polymorphic? I suspect you have asked someone to solve the halting problem. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Feb 16 '13 at 18:16
5

This works for me:

template<typename T>
struct is_polymorphic_functor
{
private:
    //test if type U has operator()(V)
    template<typename U, typename V>
    static auto ftest(U *u, V* v) -> decltype((*u)(*v), char(0));
    static std::array<char, 2> ftest(...);

    struct private_type { };

public:
    static const bool value = sizeof(ftest((T*)nullptr, (private_type*)nullptr)) == 1;
};
8
  • Er, SFINAE? It's not dissimilar to your own code, so I'm not sure what it is which you can't understand. – Andrei Tita Feb 16 '13 at 17:11
  • This already works if it's defined as template<typename... T> void operator()(T...). – Andrei Tita Feb 16 '13 at 17:15
  • It fails for other test : stacked-crooked.com/view?id=76ba03862a18526fd7082e0dda2f5c8d – Nawaz Feb 16 '13 at 17:20
  • 4
    @Nawaz That is almost, but not quite, entirely unlike your initial request. – Andrei Tita Feb 16 '13 at 17:22
  • 2
    @Nawaz: And we cannot possibly include all possible varieties of programming code in an SO answer. – Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 16 '13 at 17:52
2

Given that the nonpolymorphic functors don't have an overloaded operator():

template<typename T>
class is_polymorphic_functor {
  template <typename F, typename = decltype(&F::operator())>
  static constexpr bool get(int) { return false; }
  template <typename>
  static constexpr bool get(...) { return true; }

public:
  static constexpr bool value = get<T>(0);
};
4
2
template<template<typename>class arbitrary>
struct pathological {
  template<typename T>
  typename std::enable_if< arbitrary<T>::value >::type operator(T) const {}
};

The above functor is non-polymorphic iff there is exactly one T such that arbitrary<T>::value is true.

It isn't hard to create an template<T> functor which is true on int and possibly double, and only true on double if (arbitrary computation returns 1).

So an uncompromising is_polymorphic is beyond the scope of this universe.

If you don't like the above (because it clearly takes more than just int, other types simply fail to find an overload), we could do this:

template<template<typename>class arbitrary>
struct pathological2 {
  void operator()(int) const {}
  template<typename T>
  typename std::enable_if< arbitrary<T>::value >::type operator(T) const {}
};

where the second "overload" is tested, and if there are no T such that it is taken, then the first overload occurs for every single type.

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