142

What happens if I bind two event handlers to the same event for the same element?

For example:

var elem = $("...")
elem.click(...);
elem.click(...);

Does the last handler "win", or will both handlers be run?

8 Answers 8

175

Both handlers will run, the jQuery event model allows multiple handlers on one element, therefore a later handler does not override an older handler.

The handlers will execute in the order in which they were bound.

7
  • 1
    what happens with the native way? and how does the native know how to remove a specific one? Aug 11, 2015 at 21:09
  • 1
    According to DOM Level 3 (referencing HTML 5 spec), event handlers are executed in the order in which they are registered -w3.org/TR/DOM-Level-3-Events/#event-phase and w3.org/TR/2014/REC-html5-20141028/…. Event handlers can be removed by passing a reference to the handler that was registered
    – Russ Cam
    Aug 11, 2015 at 23:26
  • @RussCam what happens if a same handler is bound more then once lets just say jQuery('.btn').on('click',handlerClick); is called at various places without actually .off it anywher?
    – techie_28
    May 24, 2016 at 9:01
  • Note that for jQueryUI widgetfactory widgets, this isn't true if you set the handler as an option. For both the old and new handler to be called, you need to use the bind method. See this for details: learn.jquery.com/jquery-ui/widget-factory/… Feb 12, 2018 at 1:23
  • @MichaelScheper feel free to edit the answer and update with additional info
    – Russ Cam
    Feb 12, 2018 at 1:30
37

Suppose that you have two handlers, f and g, and want to make sure that they are executed in a known and fixed order, then just encapsulate them:

$("...").click(function(event){
  f(event);
  g(event);
});

In this way there is (from the perspective of jQuery) only one handler, which calls f and g in the specified order.

2
  • 3
    +1, encapsulation inside a function is the way to go. And even better conditional logic can be contained inside the handler function to control the event(s) that get triggered. Sep 29, 2009 at 10:49
  • A collection of handlers whose sequence is programmatically determined. Mar 25, 2014 at 5:54
18

jQuery's .bind() fires in the order it was bound:

When an event reaches an element, all handlers bound to that event type for the element are fired. If there are multiple handlers registered, they will always execute in the order in which they were bound. After all handlers have executed, the event continues along the normal event propagation path.

Source: http://api.jquery.com/bind/

Because jQuery's other functions (ex. .click()) are shortcuts for .bind('click', handler), I would guess that they are also triggered in the order they are bound.

0
11

You should be able to use chaining to execute the events in sequence, e.g.:

$('#target')
  .bind('click',function(event) {
    alert('Hello!');
  })
  .bind('click',function(event) {
    alert('Hello again!');
  })
  .bind('click',function(event) {
    alert('Hello yet again!');
  });

I guess the below code is doing the same

$('#target')
      .click(function(event) {
        alert('Hello!');
      })
      .click(function(event) {
        alert('Hello again!');
      })
      .click(function(event) {
        alert('Hello yet again!');
      });

Source: http://www.peachpit.com/articles/article.aspx?p=1371947&seqNum=3

TFM also says:

When an event reaches an element, all handlers bound to that event type for the element are fired. If there are multiple handlers registered, they will always execute in the order in which they were bound. After all handlers have executed, the event continues along the normal event propagation path.

7
  • 1
    Neither that code nor that article defines an order of handler execution. Yes, that is the order the event binding will occur, but the order the event handlers get called is still officially undefined. Sep 29, 2009 at 10:58
  • ehh? what about "Now when the click event occurs, the first event handler will be called, followed by the second, followed by the third." is unclear?
    – anddoutoi
    Sep 29, 2009 at 11:00
  • and yes, i know that the official recs do not define this and PPK has already proved that the event execution is random but maybe jQuery has fixed this ^^
    – anddoutoi
    Sep 29, 2009 at 11:04
  • Ahh, missed that sentence. In fact, the author is misinformed. jQuery has not "fixed" this. Because the spec does not formally define the order, technically nothing needs fixing. Sep 29, 2009 at 11:50
  • 5
    @CrescentFresh: Sorry for such a late reply, I just saw the question, but I'd like you to point to link, it is official documentation of jQuery and it clearly says that When an event reaches an element, all handlers bound to that event type for the element are fired. If there are multiple handlers registered, they will always execute in the order in which they were bound. After all handlers have executed, the event continues along the normal event propagation path.
    – Razort4x
    Sep 5, 2012 at 8:52
2

Both handlers get called.

You may be thinking of inline event binding (eg "onclick=..."), where a big drawback is only one handler may be set for an event.

jQuery conforms to the DOM Level 2 event registration model:

The DOM Event Model allows registration of multiple event listeners on a single EventTarget. To achieve this, event listeners are no longer stored as attribute values

1
  • @Rich: the order is officially undefined. Sep 29, 2009 at 10:43
2

Made it work successfully using the 2 methods: Stephan202's encapsulation and multiple event listeners. I have 3 search tabs, let's define their input text id's in an Array:

var ids = new Array("searchtab1", "searchtab2", "searchtab3");

When the content of searchtab1 changes, I want to update searchtab2 and searchtab3. Did it this way for encapsulation:

for (var i in ids) {
    $("#" + ids[i]).change(function() {
        for (var j in ids) {
            if (this != ids[j]) {
                $("#" + ids[j]).val($(this).val());
            }
        }
    });
}

Multiple event listeners:

for (var i in ids) {
    for (var j in ids) {
        if (ids[i] != ids[j]) {
            $("#" + ids[i]).change(function() {
                $("#" + ids[j]).val($(this).val());
            });
        }
    }
}

I like both methods, but the programmer chose encapsulation, however multiple event listeners worked also. We used Chrome to test it.

1

There is a workaround to guarantee that one handler happens after another: attach the second handler to a containing element and let the event bubble up. In the handler attached to the container, you can look at event.target and do something if it's the one you're interested in.

Crude, maybe, but it definitely should work.

0

jquery will execute both handler since it allows multiple event handlers. I have created sample code. You can try it

demo

0

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